Troilus and Cressida

Play by Shakespeare. The Trojan war has been going on for seven years. Few care any more about its first cause, the abduction of Helen. Each side is consumed by its own in-fighting - in saving face and destroying others. What keeps them there is their love of honour and of violence. A tragically mismanaged sideshow to this squalid war, the love of Troilus & Cressida, becomes a pattern for all relationships destroyed by circumstance, misunderstanding and deceit.

1923 Old Vic Company with Ion Swinley and Florence Saunders

1938 London Mask Theatre with Robert Harris and Ruth Lodge

1946 Open Air Theatre with John Byron and Patricia Hicks

1956 Old Vic Company with John Neville, Rosemary Harris, Wendy Hiller, and Jeremy Brett

1962 Royal Shakespeare Company with Ian Holm, Dorothy Tutin and Roy Dotrice

1969 Royal Shakespeare Company with Michael Williams, Helen Mirren, Patrick Stewart, and Ben Kingsley

1976 National Theatre with Simon Ward, Diana Quick, Brenda Blethyn, and Denis Quilley

1977 Royal Shakespeare Company with Mike Gwilym, Francesca Annis, and Alfred Molina

1981 Royal Shakespeare Company with James Hazeldine, Carol Royle, and Oliver Ford Davies

1986 Royal Shakespeare Company with Anton Lesser, Juliet Stevenson, Lindsay Duncan, and Alun Armstrong

1991 Royal Shakespeare Company with Ralph Fiennes, Amanda Root, David Troughton, and Sally Dexter

1996 Royal Shakespeare Company with Joseph Fiennes, Victoria Hamilton, Ray Fearon, and Philip Quast

1998 Open Air Theatre with Robert Hands, Rebecca Johnson, and Clive Rowe

1998 Royal Shakespeare Company with William Houston and Jayne Ashbourne

1999 National Theatre with Peter de Jersey, Sophie Okonedo, Daniel Evans, Denis Quilley, and Roger Allam

2000 Oxford Stage Company with Jordan Murphy, Eileen Walsh, and Matt Lucas

2005 Shakespeare's Globe Theatre with David Sturzaker and Juliet Rylance

2008 Cheek By Jowl with Alex Waldmann and Lucy Briggs-Owen

2009 Shakespeare's Globe Theatre with Paul Stocker, Laura Pyper, and Matthew Kelly

2012 Shakespeare's Globe Theatre with Kimo Houltham and Awhina-Rose Henare Ashby


1923 Old Vic Company with Ion Swinley and Florence Saunders

Opened 5 November 1923, Closed 17 November 1923 in repertory) at the Old Vic Theatre

The cast featured John Maclean as 'Priam', Molly Francis as 'Cassandra', Rupert Harvey as 'Hector', Ion Swinley as 'Troilus', Ronald Nicholson as 'Paris', Douglas Mattinson as 'Deiphobus', Hilton Edwards as 'Helenus'/'Calchas', Oswald Skilbeck as 'Margarelon', Jean Downs as 'Andromache', Kingsley Baker as 'Aeneas', Edmund Frank as 'Antenor', Jane Bacon as 'Helen', Florence Saunders as 'Cressida', Henry Cohen as 'Alexander'/'Servant to Paris', Neil Curtis as 'Pandarus', Agnes Carter as 'Servant to Troilus', Ernest Meads as 'Agamemnon', Robert Glennie as 'Menelaus', Wilfrid Walter as 'Achilles', George Hayes as 'Ajax', John Laurie as 'Diomedes', Arthur Blanch as 'Nestor', Reyner Barton as 'Ulysees', D. Hay Petrie as 'Thersites', and Guy Martineau as 'Patroclus'.

Directed by Robert Atkins, with designs by Hubert Hine.

This was the first time that the Old Vic had presented this play, and therefore meant that the Old Vic had performed all 36 of Shakespeare's plays from the First Folio.


1938 London Mask Theatre with Robert Harris and Ruth Lodge

Opened 21 September 1938, Closed 15 October 1938 at the Westminster Theatre (now rebuilt as the Other Palace Theatre)

Presented by the London Mask Theatre Company.

The cat featured Robert Emhardt as 'Priam'/'Calchas', Rosanna Seaborn as 'Cassandra', Colin Keith-Johnston as 'Hector', Robert Harris as 'Troilus', Michael Denison as 'Paris', Reginald Lockwood as 'Margarelon', Mary Alexander as 'Andromache', Claude Bailey as 'Aeneas', Oriel Ross as 'Helen', Ruth Lodge as 'Cressida', Elspeth Currie as 'Alexander', Max Adrian as 'Pandarus', Arthur Ridley as 'Agamemnon', David Marsh as 'Menelaus', George Woodbridge as 'Achilles', Richard George as 'Ajax', Harry Andrews as 'Diomedes', John Garside as 'Nestor', Robert Speaight as 'Ulysses', Stephen Murray as 'Thersites', Frank Linson as 'Patroclus', and Ian Howard.

Directed by Michael MacOwan, with designs by Peter Goffin.

The London Mask Theatre was a newly formed theatre company by playwright J B Priestley, along with Michael MacOwan, R H Parker, and Ronald Jeans.


1946 Open Air Theatre with John Byron and Patricia Hicks

Opened 28 June 1946, Closed 13 July 1946 at the Regent's Park Open Air Theatre

The cast featured Ronald Woodroofe as 'Priam', Angela Shafto as 'Cassandra', John Vere as 'Hector', John Byron as 'Troilus', Andrew Faulds as 'Paris', John Humphry as 'Helenus'/'Margarelon', Diana Wilson as 'Andromache', Thomas Dance as 'Aeneas', Oscar Quitak as 'Calchas'/'Alexander', Elizabeth Marshall as 'Helen', Patricia Hicks as 'Cressida', Russell Thorndike as 'Pandarus', Ronald Stocks as 'Servant to Paris', Desmond Llewelyn as 'Agamemnon', Jack Lynn as 'Menelaus', Richard Littledale as 'Achilles', Hugh Manning as 'Ajax', Peter Bell as 'Diomedes', Clement Hamelin as 'Nestor', David Read as 'Ulysses', Ivan Staff as 'Thersites', and David March as 'Patroclus'.

Directed by Robert Atkins.

This was the first time at this play had been presented at the Open Air Theatre in Regent's Park since it had been founded in 1932.


1956 Old Vic Company with John Neville, Rosemary Harris, Wendy Hiller, and Jeremy Brett

Opened 3 April 1956, Closed 9 June 1956 (in repertory) at the Old Vic Theatre

The cast featured Job Stewart as 'Priam', Rachel Roberts as 'Cassandra', Jack Gwillim as 'Hector', John Neville as 'Troilus', Ronald Allen as 'Paris', John Woodvine as 'Deiphobus', John Wood as 'Helenus', Margaret Courtenay as 'Andromache', Denis Holmes as 'Aeneas', James Villers as 'Antenor', Gerald Cross as 'Calchas', Wendy Hiller as 'Helen', Rosemary Harris as 'Cressida', Aubrey Morris as 'Cressida's Groom', Paul Rogers as 'Pandarus', John Greenwood as 'Troilus's Servant', Derek Francis as 'Agamemnon', Edward Harvey as 'Menelaus', Charles Gray as 'Achilles', Laurence Hardy as 'Ajax', Anthony White as 'Diomedes', Dudley Jones as 'Nestor', Richard Wordsworth as 'Ulysses', Clifford Williams as 'Thersites', and Jeremy Brett as 'Patroclus'.

Directed by Tyrone Guihrie, with designs by Frederick Crooke, and music by Frederick Marshall.

Richard Burton was originally scheduled to play the role of 'Thersites', but withdrew shortly before performances where due to begin because he was already playing three leading parts in two of the Old Vic's current repertory season: The title role in Henry V; and alternating the roles of 'Othello' and 'Iago', with John Neville, in Othello.


1962 Royal Shakespeare Company with Ian Holm, Dorothy Tutin and Roy Dotrice

Opened 15 October 1962, Closed 30 November 1962 (in repertory) at the Aldwych Theatre

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.

The cast featured Donald Layne-Smith as 'Priam', Sonia Fraser as 'Cassandra', Derek Godfrey as 'Hector', Ian Holm as 'Troilus', John Ronane as 'Paris', Shaun Curry as 'Deiphobus', Roger Croucher as 'Helenus', Mark Moss as 'Margarelon', Cherry Morris as 'Andromache', Brian Smith as 'Aeneas', Edward Argent as 'Antenor', John Hussey as 'Calchas', Maxine Audley as 'Helen', Dorothy Tutin as 'Cressida', Roger Croucher as 'Alexander', Max Adrian as 'Pandarus', Ian Ricketts as 'Troilus' Page', John Nettleton as 'Agamemnon', Trevor Martin as 'Menelaus', Patrick Allen as 'Achilles', Roy Dotrice as 'Ajax', David Buck as 'Diomedes', Ken Wynne as 'Nestor', Michael Murray Hordern as 'Ulysses', Gordon Gostelow as 'Thersites', Peter McEnery as 'Patroclus', withMargareta Bourdin, Paul Dawkins, Marian Diamond, Terence Greenidge, Imogen Hassall, Caroline Hunt, Robert Jennings, Darryl Kavann, Henry Knowles, Roy Marsden, Caroline Maud, Kenneth Ratcliffe, Stuart Richman, and Leslie Southwick.

Directed by Peter Hall, with designs by Leslie Hurry, and music by Humphrey Searle.


1969 Royal Shakespeare Company with Michael Williams, Helen Mirren, Patrick Stewart, and Ben Kingsley

Opened 19 June 1969, Closed 21 February 1970 (in repertory) at the Aldwych Theatre

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.

The cast featured Peter Cochran as 'Priam', Sara Kestelman as 'Cassandra', Patrick Stewart as 'Hector', Michael Williams as 'Troilus', Bernard Lloyd as 'Paris', Stephen Turner as 'Deiphobus', David Firth as 'Helenus', Hugh Keays-Byrne as 'Margarelon', Hildegard Neil as 'Andromache'/'Helen', Ben Kingsley as 'Aeneas', J D Stender as 'Antenor', George Cormack as 'Calchas', Helen Mirren as 'Cressida', John York as 'Alexander', David Waller as 'Pandarus', Bryan Robson as 'Agamemnon', Ted Valentine as 'Menelaus', Alan Howard as 'Achilles', Richard Moore as 'Ajax', Bruce Myers as 'Diomedes', Clifford Rose as 'Nestor', Sebastian Shaw as 'Ulysses', Norman Rodway as 'Thersites', and Richard Jones Barry as 'Patroclus', with Paul Arlington, Martin Bax, Domini Blythe, Ralph Cotterill, Ian Dyson, David Forbes, Peter Harlowe, Ruby Head, Glynne Lewis, James Mackenzie, Valerie Minifie, Robert Oates, Mary Rutherford, David Sadgrove, David Stern, and Phillip Manikum.

Directed by John Barton, with choreography by Christie Dickason, designs by Timothy O'Brien, lighting by John Bradley and Stewart Leviton, and music by Guy Woolfenden.


1976 National Theatre with Simon Ward, Diana Quick, Brenda Blethyn, and Denis Quilley

Previewed 16 June 1976, Opened 17 June 1976, Closed 30 September 1976 (in repertory) at the Young Vic Theatre

Presented by the National Theatre.

The cast featured Norman Claridge as 'Priam', Brenda Blethyn as 'Cassandra', Denis Quilley as 'Hector', Simon Ward as 'Troilus', Glyn Grain as 'Paris', Timothy Block as 'Deiphobus', Michael Keating as 'Helenus', John Gill as 'Margarelon', Carol Frazer as 'Andromache', Brian Kent as 'Aeneas', Paul Dawkins as 'Calchas', Polly Adams as 'Helen', Diana Quick as 'Cressida', Patrick Monckton as 'Alexander', Robert Eddison as 'Pandarus', Roland Culver as 'Agamemnon', Daniel Thorndike as 'Menelaus', Mark McManus as 'Achilles', Derek Newark as 'Ajax', Andrew Hilton as 'Diomedes', Nicholas Selby as 'Nestor', Philip Locke as 'Ulysses', Philip Stone as 'Thersites', Struan Rodger as 'Patroclus', and Desmond Adams.

Directed by Elijah Moshinsky, with designs by Timothy O'Brien and Tazeena Firth, and lighting by David Hersey.


1977 Royal Shakespeare Company with Mike Gwilym, Francesca Annis, and Alfred Molina

Previewed 13 September 1977, Opened 15 September 1977, Closed 26 October 1977 (in repertory) at the Aldwych Theatre

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.

The cast featured Dennis Clinton as 'Priam', Carmen Du Sautoy as 'Cassandra', Michael Pennington as 'Hector', Mike Gwilym as 'Troilus', Richard Durden as 'Paris', Kevin O'Shea as 'Deiphobus', Paul Wagar as 'Helenus', Alfred Molina as 'Margarelon', Avril Carson as 'Andromache', Nickolas Grace as 'Aeneas', Rod Culbertson as 'Antenor', Clyde Pollitt as 'Calchas', Barbara Leigh-Hunt as 'Helen', Francesca Annis as 'Cressida', Alan Cody as 'Alexander', David Waller as 'Pandarus', Kim Begley as 'Paris' Servant'/'Diomedes' Servant', Ivan Beavis as 'Agamemnon', Martin Read as 'Menelaus', Paul Shelley as 'Achilles', Brian Coburn as 'Ajax', Hilton McRae as 'Diomedes', Norman Tyrrell as 'Nestor', Tony Church as 'Ulysses', John Nettles as 'Thersites', Paul Moriarty as 'Patroclus', and Christopher Whitehouse.

Directed by Barry Kyle, with designs by Chris Dyer, lighting by Clive Morris, and music by Guy Woolfenden.


1981 Royal Shakespeare Company with James Hazeldine, Carol Royle, and Oliver Ford Davies

Previewed 1 July 1981, Opened 6 July 1981, Closed 25 August 1981 (in repertory) at the Aldwych Theatre

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.

The cast featured Raymond Llewellyn as 'Priam', Catherine Riding as 'Cassandra', Bruce Purchase as 'Hector', James Hazeldine as 'Troilus', Bille Brown as 'Paris', Jonathan Tafler as 'Deiphobus', Timothy Walker as 'Helenus', Abraham Osuagwu as 'Margarelon', Patricia Shakesby as 'Andromache', Paul Whitworth as 'Aeneas', Peter MacKriel as 'Antenor', John Darrell as 'Calchas', Barbara Kinghorn as 'Helen', Carol Royle as 'Cressida', Rolf Saxon as 'Cressida's Servant', Tony Church as 'Pandarus', Sion Tudor-Owen as 'Troilus' Boy', Kilian McKenna as 'Paris' Servant', Trevor Baxter as 'Agamemnon', Richard Cordery as 'Menelaus', David Suchet as 'Achilles', Terry Wood as 'Ajax', Pip Miller as 'Diomedes', Oliver Ford Davies as 'Nestor', John Carlisle as 'Ulysses', Joe Melia as 'Thersites', and Chris Hunter as 'Patroclus', with Grant Cathro, Michael Packer, and Phillip Walsh.

Directed by Terry Hands, with designs by Farrah, lighting by Clive Morris, lighting by Terry Hands, and music by Nigel Hess.


1986 Royal Shakespeare Company with Anton Lesser, Juliet Stevenson, Lindsay Duncan, and Alun Armstrong

Previewed 1 May 1986, Opened 6 May 1986, Closed 30 August 1986 (in repertory) at the Barbican Theatre

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.

The cast featured Colin Douglas as 'Priam', Pauline Moran as 'Cassandra', David Burke as 'Hector', Anton Lesser as 'Troilus', Sean Baker as 'Paris', Paul Spence as 'Helenus'/'Margarelon', Geraldine Wright as 'Andromache', Alexander Wilson as 'Aeneas', Richard Conway as 'Calchas', Lindsay Duncan as 'Helen', Juliet Stevenson as 'Cressida', Roger Hyams as ' Alexander', Clive Merrison as 'Pandarus', Joseph O'Conor as 'Agamemnon', Peter Theedom as 'Menelaus', Clive Mantle as 'Achilles', Clive Russell as 'Ajax', Jeffery Kissoon as 'Diomedes', Mark Dignam as 'Nestor', Peter Jeffrey as 'Ulysses', Alun Armstrong as 'Thersites', and Hilton McRae as 'Patroclus', with Russell Boulter, Emma D'Inverno, Janine Gore, Thomas Kett, Gerard Logan, Mike Murray, Simon Roberts, Hugh Simon, David Summer, Christopher Wright, and Andrew Yeats.

Directed by Howard Davies, with sets by Ralph Koltai, costumes by Liz Da Costa, lighting by Jeffrey Beecroft, and music by Ilona Sekacz.


1991 Royal Shakespeare Company with Ralph Fiennes, Amanda Root, David Troughton, and Sally Dexter

Previewed 12 June 1991, Opened 18 June 1991, Closed 4 January 1992 (in repertory) at the Barbican Pit Theatre

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.

The cast featured Griffith Jones as 'Priam', Katrina Levon as 'Cassandra', David Troughton as 'Hector', Ralph Fiennes as 'Troilus' (up to Saturday 31 August 1991), Paterson Joseph as 'Troilus' (from Tuesday 17 September 1991), John Warnaby as 'Paris', Michael Bott as 'Helenus', Julie Saunders as 'Andromache', Mike Dowling as 'Aeneas', Simon Austin as 'Antenor', Richard Avery as 'Calchas', Sally Dexter as 'Helen', Amanda Root as 'Cressida', Lloyd Hutchinson as 'Alexander', Norman Rodway as 'Pandarus', Shura Greenberg as 'Paris' Servant', Sylvester Morand as 'Agamemnon', Michael Gardiner as 'Menelaus', Ciaran Hinds as 'Achilles', Richard Ridings as 'Ajax', Grant Thatcher as 'Diomedes', Alfred Burke as 'Nestor', Paul Jesson as 'Ulysses', Simon Russell Beale as 'Thersites', and Paterson Joseph as 'Patroclus' (up to Saturday 31 August 1991).

Directed by Sam Mendes, with designs by Anthony Ward, music by Shaun Davey, and lighting by Geraint Pughe.


1996 Royal Shakespeare Company with Joseph Fiennes, Victoria Hamilton, Ray Fearon, and Philip Quast

Previewed 28 November 1996, Opened 4 December 1996, Closed 25 March 1977 (in repertory) at the Barbican Theatre

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.

The cast featured Griffith Jones as 'Priam', Sara Weymouth as 'Cassandra', Louis Hilyer as 'Hector', Joseph Fiennes as 'Troilus', Ray Fearon as 'Paris', Mark Gillis as 'Deiphobus', Alisdair Simpson as 'Helenus', Stephen Billington as 'Margarelon', Martina Laird as 'Andromache', David Pullan as 'Aeneas', Simon Westwood as 'Antenor', Raymond Bowers as 'Calchas', Katia Caballero as 'Helen', Victoria Hamilton as 'Cressida', Paul Ritter as 'Alexander', Clive Francis as 'Pandarus', Adrian Schiller as 'Paris' Servant', Edward De Souza as 'Agamemnon', Colin Farrell as 'Menelaus', Philip Quast as 'Achilles', Ross O'Hennessy as 'Ajax', Richard Dillane as 'Diomedes', Arthur Cox as 'Nestor', Philip Voss as 'Ulysses', Richard McCabe as 'Thersites', Jeremy Sheffield as 'Patroclus', and David Fahm as 'Diomedes' Servant'.

Directed by Ian Judge, with movement by Lindsay Dolan, sets by John Gunter, costumes by Deirdre Clancy, lighting by Simon Tapping, and music by Ian Kellam.


1998 Open Air Theatre with Robert Hands, Rebecca Johnson, and Clive Rowe

Previewed 9 June, Opened 11 June 1998, Closed 3 September 1998 (in repertory) at the Regent's Park Open Air Theatre

The Open Air Theatre present Alan Strachan's production of William Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida in London

The cast featured Jeffery Dench as 'Priam', Helen Grace as 'Cassandra', Martin Turner as 'Hector', Robert Hands as 'Troilus', Timothy Watson as 'Paris', Oliver Jackson as 'Helenus'/'Antenor', Adam Sims as 'Margarelon/'Alexander', Audrey Palmer as 'Andromache', Andy Mace as 'Aeneas', Gareth Williams as 'Calchas', Nicola Duffett as 'Helen', Rebecca Johnson as 'Cressida', Christopher Godwin as 'Pandarus', Gary Raymond as 'Agamemnon', John Duval as 'Menelaus', Daniel Flynn as 'Achilles', Tony Whittle as 'Ajax', Harry Burton as 'Diomedes', John Griffiths as 'Nestor', Michael Elwyn as 'Ulysses', Clive Rowe as 'Thersites', and Damien Matthews as 'Patroclus', with Ian McLarnon, Joanne Redman, Nova Skipp, and Deborah Stokes.

Director by Alan Strachan, with choreography by Geraldlne Stephenson, designs by Paul Farnsworth, lighting by Jason Taylor, music by Catherine Jayes, and sound by Simon Whitehorn.

"Regent's Park Shakespeare may mostly remain rough and traditional, but at least these days they venture beyond the Comedies. So Alan Strachan's directorial foray into Shakespeare's darkest problem play deserves one cheer for daring. Sadly, though, it's a limp affair. Shakespeare's debunking epic of a waiting-game Trojan war, in which erotic love and military heroism lose their glow, is perfunctorily transmitted... Robert Hands's Troilus suffers the betrayal of Rebecca Johnson's arch Cressida as if it were a minor toothache. Christopher Godwin's dandyish, moustachioed Pandarus lacks voyeuristic complicity, while Clive Rowe turns Thersites into a put-upon Caliban." The London Evening Standard

"Alan Strachan stages Troy on a set made of Greek columns and he dispenses with the usual butch leather-thong look in favour of Ruritanian uniforms off a Quality Street box, helpfully colour-coded for opposing camps. Performances vary wildly... Still,it's distinguished by a handful of strong performances. Daniel Flynn's Achilles is red-haired and ferocious, a change from the usual sulky drawers portrayal Thersites — the repulsive chorus figure — is shrilly played by the wobbly-buttocked musical star Clive Rowe, his face eaten away with disease. Helen Grace's Cassandra, escorted by a psychiatric nurse, unleashes prophesies with a wonderful deranged quality. The walls of Troy are infested with wood-pigeons and shaken by passing 707s, but the trees look great when lit up by whizz-bangs and bombshells. Even the cold somehow suits the chill coming off this magnificent, rancid play about mythical heroes behaving badly." The Daily Express

"Alan Strachan points up Shakespeare's timelessness by setting the play during World War I, when Europe's proud towers were as shaky as Ilium's and proved equally vulnerable to lethal pigheadedness and a measure of humbug backed by force... The price of striking parallels between ancient and modern civilisations linked by unchangingly destructive human nature, is a wilful anachronism or two (Trojans using binoculars or proffering cigarettes to an honoured foe), but it's a price worth paying. And the cast has strength in depth, although Christopher Godwin and Clive Rowe nearly make the title Pandarus And Thersites. Godwin makes Pandarus a cadaverously elegant, social climber... Rowe is unrecognisable, though equally effective, as Thersites, that loudly persistent mocker of hollow men... Rebecca Johnson's Cressida is a touchingly credible flirt, intoxicated by drawing attention. Robert Hands, as a teenager in love with love, matches her." The Daily Mail

Troilus and Cressida in London at the Regent's Park Open Air Theatre previewed from 9 June 1998, opened on 11 June 1998, and closed on 3 September 1998 (in repertory).


1998 Royal Shakespeare Company with William Houston and Jayne Ashbourne

Previewed 28 October 1998, Opened 5 November 1998, Closed 21 November 1998 at the Barbican Pit Theatre

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.

The cast featured Michael Loughnan as 'Priam', Janet Whiteside as 'Hecuba', Catherine Walker as 'Cassandra', Alistair Petrie as 'Hector', William Houston as 'Troilus', Jack Tarlton as 'Paris', Stephen Armstrong as 'Helenus', Jane MacFarlane as 'Andromache', Rory Murray as 'Aeneas', Robert Calvert as 'Calchas', Sara Stewart as 'Helen', Jayne Ashbourne as 'Cressida', Roy Hanlon as 'Pandarus', Sam Graham as 'Agamemnon', Sam Cox as 'Menelaus', Darren D'Silva as 'Achilles', Paul Hamilton as 'Ajax', Robert Willox as 'Diomedes', Colin Hurley as 'Ulysses', Lloyd Hutchinson as 'Thersites', and Elaine Pyke as 'Patroclus'.

Directed by Michael Boyd, with movement by Liz Ranken, designs by Tom Piper, lighting by Chris Davey, and music by John Woolf.


1999 National Theatre with Peter de Jersey, Sophie Okonedo, Daniel Evans, Denis Quilley, and Roger Allam

Previewed 6 March 1999, Opened 15 March 1999, Closed 24 July 1999 (in repertory) at the National Theatre's Olivier Theatre

The National Theatre present Trevor Nunn's production of William Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida in London

The cast featured Oscar James as 'Priam', Jax Williams as 'Cassandra', Dhobi Oparei as 'Hector', Peter de Jersey as 'Troilus', Chu Omambala as 'Paris', Mark Springer as 'Deiphobus', Vernon Douglas as 'Helenus', Michael Wildman as 'Margarelon', Sara Powell as 'Andromache', Andrew French as 'Aeneas', Ruddy L Davis as 'Calchas', Aislinn Sands as 'Helen', Sophie Okonedo as 'Cressida', Giles Terera as 'Alexander', David Bamber as 'Pandarus', Claudia Cadette as 'A Servant of Troilus', Oliver Cotton as 'Agamemnon', David Burt as 'Menelaus', Raymond Coulthard as 'Achilles', Simon Day as 'Ajax', Alexander Hanson as 'Diomedes', Denis Quilley as 'Nestor', Roger Allam as 'Ulysses', Jasper Britton as 'Thersites', Daniel Evans as 'Patroclus', and Mark Umbers as 'A Servant of Diomedes', with David Arneil, Robert Burt, Martin Chamberlain, Jim Creighton, Jack James, Samantha Lavender, Liam McKenna, Charles Millham, John Nolan, and David Weston.

Directed by Trevor Nunn, with choreography by Lucie Pankhurst, designs by Rob Howell, lighting by Paul Pyant, music by Gary Yershon, and sound by Colin Pink.

Peter de Jersey's London theatre credits include playing 'Orlando' in David Thacker's revival of William Shakespeare's As You Like It, for the Royal Shakespeare Company, at the Barbican Theatre in 1993.

Daniel Evans' London stage credits include playing the title role in John Caird and Fiona Laird's revival of JM Barrie's Peter Pan at the National Theatre's Olivier Thatre in 1997.

Denis Quilley's London theatre credits include playing 'Prospero' in Patrick Garland's revival of William Shakespeare's The Tempest at the Regent's Park Open Air Theatre in 1996; 'Georges' in Arthur Laurents' production of Jerry Herman's La Cage aux Folles at the London Palladium in 1986; 'Alexander Molokov' in the original concert production of the Benny Andersson, Bjorn Ulvaeus, and Tim Rice musical Chess at the Barbican Hall in 1984; the title role in Harold Prince's production of Stephen Sondheim's Sweeney Todd at the Theatre Royal Drury Lane in 1980; 'Acting Captain Terri Dennis' in Michael Blakemore's production of Peter Nichols' Privates on Parade, for the Royal Shakespeare Company, at the Aldwych Theatre in 1977, and transfer to the Piccadilly Theatre in 1978; the title role in Michael Blakemore's revival of William Shakespeare's Macbeth, for the National Theatre, at the Old Vic Theatre in 1973; 'Jamie Tyrone' in Michael Blakemore's revival of Eugene O'Neill's Long Day's Journey Into Night at the New Theatre in 1971; and 'Antipholus of Ephesus' in Christopher Hewett's production of the Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart musical The Boys From Syracuse at the Theatre Royal Drury Lane in 1963.

Roger Allam's London stage credits include playing the title role in Tim Albery's revival of William Shakespeare's Macbeth, for the Royal Shakespeare Company, at the Barbican Theatre in 1996; 'John Worthing' in Terry Hands' revival of Oscar Wilde's The Importance Of Being Earnest at the Old Vic Theatre in 1995; 'Bernard Nightingale' in Trevor Nunn's production of Tom Stoppard's Arcadia at the Haymarket Thatre in 1994; 'Stone' in Michael Blakemore's production of the Cy Coleman and David Zippel musical City of Angels at the Prince of Wales Theatre in 1993; 'Duke Vincentio' in Nicholas Hytner's revival of William Shakespeare's Measure for Measure, for the Royal Shakespeare Company, at the Barbican Theatre in 1988; 'Javert' in the original cast of Trevor Nunn and John Caird's production of the Alain Boublil, Claude-Michel Schonberg, and Herbert Kretzmer musical Les Miserables at the Barbican Theatre, and transfer to the West End's Palace Theatre in 1985; and 'Lin Tse-Tsii' in Terry Hands and Ian Judge's production of the Peter Nichols and Monty Norman musical Poppy, for the Royal Shakespeare Company, at the Barbican Theatre in 1982.

"On the vast Olivier arena stage, Trevor Nunn's full-hearted, full-throated revival has designs and costumes of stunning, timeless simplicity by Rob Howell... The continual shuffling between epic parade and hand-to-hand combat is expertly conveyed. And in the title roles, Peter de Jersey and Sophie Okonedo imply a world of passion, lost love, then confusion... Roger Allam is an exemplary and masterfully spoken Ulysses, Denis Quilley a reliable old Nestor, David Burt a tortured Menelaus, the cuckolded husband of Helen, and Jasper Britton a flyblown, festering and funny Thersites... The great open spaces of the theatre are well used, the battles exciting, the death of Hector truly grisly. In all, a long but utterly rewarding evening." The Daily Mail

"Trevor Nunn's magnificent new production of Troilus And Cressida in a revamped Olivier is a breakthrough. Not only because it signals the creation of an ensemble and casts the Trojans as black and the Greeks as white. It completes a process that has been gathering force for years: the reclamation of Cressida as a genuine tragic character... The stress is on narrative clarity. Nunn's great virtue is that he re-creates the play by re-defining character. Instead of simply opposing romantic Trojans and pragmatic Greeks, he implies that the former are weighed down by a doomed paternalism and the latter by a warring individualism... Nunn's production makes exciting use of the space and unites intimate detail and symbolic gesture." The Guardian

"[It] reconquers the Olivier stage for its true purpose: the performance of the great epic plays of the classical theatre... Troilus's fate is a spiritual death, which is what makes this play such a modern tragedy. Peter de Jersey plays him as both warrior and dreamer, aggressive but insecure... Sophie Okonedo's Cressida is one of the very few I have seen to come close to the character's tragic ambiguity. Is she capable of love, or only passion? At first Okonedo plays a streetwise adolescent, showing more confidence than she feels: she is more mature than Troilus, but less sure whether she wants an adventure or a commitment... Nunn's production is crowned by two brilliantly dark and sinister performances. One is David Bamber's Pandarus: a hyperactive old fruit with a touch of fugitive dignity... The other is Jasper Britton's Thersites: a malevolent outcast for whom hatred of others is a function of self-loathing, and who detests war and lechery because he is beyond both." The Sunday Times

Troilus and Cressida in London at the National Theatre's Olivier Theatre previewed from 6 March 1999, opened on 15 March 1999, and closed on 24 July 1999 (in repertory)


2000 Oxford Stage Company with Jordan Murphy, Eileen Walsh, and Matt Lucas

Previewed 29 March 2000, Opened 31 March 2000, Closed 15 April 2000 at the Old Vic Theatre

The Oxford Stage Company present Dominic Dromgoole's production of William Shakespeare's Troilus And Cressida in London

The cast featured Robert Langdon Lloyd as 'Priam'/'Calchas', Nicola Wheeler as 'Cassandra'/'Cressida's Companions', Robert Patterson as 'Hector', Jordan Murphy as 'Troilus', Dermot Kerrigan as 'Paris', Jonathan Dryden Taylor as 'Helenus'/'Margarelon', Maggie Hayes as 'Andromache'/'Cressida's Companions', Liam Hourican as 'Aeneas', Alex Gallafent as 'Antenor', Sasha Behar as 'Helen'/'Cressida's Companions', Eileen Walsh as 'Cressida', Darragh Kelly as 'Pandarus', David Cardy as 'Agamemnon', Rob Jarvis as 'Menelaus'/'Paris' Servant', Shaun Dingwall as 'Achilles', Nathaniel Duncan as 'Ajax', Laurence Mitchell as 'Diomedes', Fred Ridgeway as 'Nestor', Paul Ritter as 'Ulysses', Matt Lucas as 'Thersites', and Kenny Doughty as 'Patrocius'.

Directed by Dominic Dromgoole, with designs by Anthony Lambie, lighting by Simon Bennison, and music by Adam Cork.

"This is a production that wants to say something, even if its message gets garbled. It begins as it means to go on with Paul Ritter's sly, scrubby-bearded and excellently-spoken Ulysses delivering the prologue in grubby underpants, armed only with a coffee-pot and a fag. From the Greek perspective, the Trojan Wars are presented as the package holiday from hell... The Greeks speak with English accents, while the Trojans, who stage their council round an indoor swimming pool, are Irish... There's a sizeable problem in the fact that everything is so blatantly anti-heroic from the outset that we have little left to discover. What keeps you gripped are Dromgoole's infectious fascination with the piece and the scattering of fine performances, in particular that of Paul Ritter, and Eileen Walsh's toothy, unconventionally desirable Cressida, who brings a touching vulnerability to the character's sexual knowingness." The Independent

"The toothily attractive Walsh is unusually effective when it comes to acknowledging the oddly knowing quality that from the play's start undermines Cressida's claims to chastity. But Murphy, though warm and robust, seems less than sexually besotted - and slurs his words badly. But it's hard to complain of a mismatch here when your imagination is so forcefully diverted elsewhere: on to Nathaniel Duncan's Ajax, a bare-knuckle boxer, or Paul Ritter's sly, scrawny Ulysses, or Dermot Kerrigan's spivvish Paris, or even Rob Jarvis's rabbity Menelaus." The Times

"It is a spirited production, but the acting is variable, and some of the verse-speaking substandard. Troilas in particular tends to butcher his best lines. Eileen Walsh makes an engaging Cressida, however, and there's an excellent performance from Darragh Kelly as a blazered and flannelled Pandarus. The novelty item is the comedian Matt Lucas as Thersites: he is quite good, though his interpolated gags undermine the desired misanthropic effect." The Sunday Telegraph

Troilus and Cressida in London at the Old Vic Theatre previewed from 29 March 2000, opened on 31 March 2000, and closed on 15 April 2000


2005 Shakespeare's Globe Theatre with David Sturzaker and Juliet Rylance

Opened 24 August 2005, Closed 28 September 2005 (in repertory) at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The cast featured Roger McKern as 'Priam'/'Alexander'/'Diomedes', Hayley Jane Standing as 'Cassandra'/'Nestor', Philip Bird as 'Hector'/'Deiphobus'/'Calchas', David Sturzaker as 'Troilus', Thomas Padden as 'Paris'/'Menelaus', Sam Alexander as 'Margarelon'/'Antenor'/'Patroclus', Juliet Rylance as 'Andromache'/'Cressida', Liana Weafer as 'Aeneas'/'Helen', Peter Forbes as 'Pandarus', Yolanda Vazquez as 'Agamemnon', Edward Peel as 'Achilles', Roger Watkins as 'Ajax', Penelope Beaumont as 'Ulysses', and Colin Hurley as 'Thersites'.

Directed by Giles Block, with designs by Rebecca Seager, and music by Joseph Phibbs.

Performed on Wednesdays only for six weeks, using live music with minimal settings.

This production, which was the first time that the play had been performed at the re-constructed Globe Theatre, explored the eloquence possible in performing the play text using the original pronunicaton from when Shakespeare wrote it. This was the first professional production in 400 years to stage an entire run of a Shakespeare play in the original pronunciation.


2008 Cheek By Jowl with Alex Waldmann and Lucy Briggs-Owen

Previewed 22 May 2008, Opened 28 May 2008, Closed 14 June 2008 at the Barbican Theatre

Presented by Cheek By Jowl.

The cast featured Paul Brennen as 'Priam'/'Achilles', Marianne Oldham as 'Cassandra'/'Helen', David Caves as 'Hector', Alex Waldmann as 'Troilus', Oliver Coleman as 'Paris', Gabriel Fleary as 'Helenus'/'Alexander', Tom McClane as 'Aeneas', Richard Cant as 'Calchas'/'Thersites', Lucy Briggs-Owen as 'Cressida'/'Andromache', David Collings as 'Pandarus', Anthony Mark Barrow as 'Agammemnon', Laurence Spellman as 'Ajax', Mark Holgate as 'Diomedes', Damian Kearney as 'Nestor', Ryan Kiggell as 'Ulysses', and David Ononokpono as 'Patroclus'.

Directed by Declan Donnellan, with movement by Jane Gibson, sets by Nick Ormerod, costumes by Angie Burns, lighting by Judith Greenwood, music by Catherine Jayes, and sound by Gregory Clarke.


2009 Shakespeare's Globe Theatre with Paul Stocker, Laura Pyper, and Matthew Kelly

Previewed 12 July 2009, Opened 22 July 2009, Closed 20 September 2009 (in repertory) at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The Shakespeare's Globe Theatre present Matthew Dunster's production of William Shakespeare's Troilus And Cressida in London

The cast featured Seamus O’Neill as 'Priam'/'Calchas', Ania Sowinski as 'Cassandra'/'Helen', Christopher Colquhoun as 'Hector', Paul Stocker as 'Troilus', Ben Bishop as 'Paris', Jay Taylor as 'Helenus'/'Diomedes', Olivia Chaney as 'Andromache', Fraser James as 'Aeneas', Laura Pyper as 'Cressida', Richard Hansell as 'Alexander'/'Menelaus', Matthew Kelly as 'Pandarus', Matthew Flynn as 'Agamemnon', Trystan Gravelle as 'Achilles', Chinna Wodu as 'Ajax', John Stahl as 'Nestor', Jamie Ballard as 'Ulysses', Paul Hunter as 'Thersites', and Beru Tessema as 'Patroclus'.

Directed by Matthew Dunster, with choreography by Aline David, designs by Anna Fleischle, and music by Olly Fox.

Laura Pyper's London theatre credits include the role of 'Elvira' in Michael Grandage's production of Patrick Marber's Don Juan In Soho at the Donmar Warehouse 2006.

Matthew Kelly's London stage credits include the roles of 'George' in Andrew Hall's revival of Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? at the Trafalgar Studios 2 in 2009; and 'Lennie' in Jonathan Church's revival of John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men at the Savoy Theatre in 2003.

"Matthew Dunster is a smart and sensitive director, and here conjures up some strong moments and emphatic performances, but his production never quite gels. Dunster's scenes work well in isolation but as the unpredictable plot surges forward, they stall to make less sense... While Dunster is good at extracting the laughs from Shakespeare's text, the extravagant comic performances start to grate as the play turns darker... Dunster has a good stab at coralling this unwieldy play but never sufficiently illuminates the contradictions and complexities that make it such a challenging but fascinating piece." The London Metro

"Matthew Kelly is rather fun as Pandarus, the smarmy go-between who brings together Troilus and Cressida. Theirs is an utterly irrevelant affair but here it is given a lovely, fiery passion by Laura Pyper and Paul Stocker. It is left to Jamie Ballard's Ulysses to deliver the great set speeches of philosophising in the Greek councils of war... A story well told, and one that brings a refreshing note of bitterness to this cheery venue." The Mail on Sunday

"The first half of Matthew Dunster's production is a bit ordinary, but it develops into something properly poisonous. Cressida, sent to the Greeks in a hostage swap, finds infidelity a survival tactic, while the betrayed Troilus severs his last ties to fair play. The animating spirit here is Paul Hunter's scabby-scalped Thersites, a droll, mocking observer who humps the scenery like a lascivious frog." The Sunday Times

Troilus and Cressida in London at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre previewed from 12 July 2009, opened on 22 July 2009, and closed on 20 September 2009 (in repertory)


2012 Shakespeare's Globe Theatre with Kimo Houltham and Awhina-Rose Henare Ashby

23 and 24 April 2012 at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

Presented by Ngakau Toa from New Zealand, and performd in Maori.

Performed in Maori as A Toroihi raua ko Kahira, translated by Te Haumihiata Mason.

The cast featured Kimo Houltham as 'Toroihi' (Troilus), and Awhina-Rose Henare Ashby as 'Kahira' (Cressida).

Directed by Rachel House and Jamus Webster.

Presented as part of the 'Globe to Globe Festival 2012' which featured all 37 of Shakespeare's plays in 37 languages performed by companies from all over the world.