The Seagull

Harold Pinter Theatre
Panton Street, London

Public Previews: 29 June 2022
Opens: TBA
Closes: 10 September 2022

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The Seagull

A major revival of Anton Chekhov's The Seagull in London starring Emilia Clarke

As guests assemble at a country house for the staging of an avant-garde open air play, artistic temperaments ignite a more entertaining drama behind the scenes, with romantic jealousies, self-doubt and the ruthless pursuit of happiness confusing lives, loves and literature.

Anton Chekhov's masterpiece play entwines comic and tragic situations in the lives of a famous actress, her son and their lovers. As the young strive for fulfilment, their older counterparts look back to youthful dreams that remain unfulfilled. The first of Chekhov's great works, this play is now celebrated as one of the most important plays of the nineteenth century.

Presented in an adaptation by Anya Reiss. This production was originally presented at the Playhouse Theatre in March 2020, but due to the COVID-19 situation, it was forced to close after playing only four preview performances.

The cast features Indira Varma as 'Arkadina', Daniel Monks as 'Konstantin', Emilia Clarke as 'Nina', Sophie Wu as 'Masha', and Tom Rhys Harries as 'Trigorin' who are all reprising their roles from the original 2020 season. Further casting to be announced.

Directed by Jamie Lloyd, with sets by Soutra Gilmour, costumes by Anna Josephs, lighting by Jackie Shemesh, and sound by George Dennis.

Anton Chekhov's plays include Ivanov, The Wood Demon, Uncle Vanya, The Three Sisters and The Cherry Orchard.

Note: This production was originally presented at the Playhouse Theatre when it was scheduled to start public previews from 11 March 2020, open on 19 March 2020, and close on 30 May 2020. Unfortunately, due to the COVID-19 situation, although this production began preview performances, it closed on 14 March 2020, and therefore never officially 'Opened'.

Indira Varma's London theatre credits include 'Liz Essendine' in Matthew Warchus' revival of Noel Coward's Present Laughter at the Old Vic in 2019; 'Miss Cutts' in Jamie Lloyd's revival of Harold Pinter's The Hothouse at the Trafalgar Studios in 2013; 'Olivia' in Michael Grandage's revival of William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night at the Wyndham's Theatre in 2008; 'Sasha' in Katie Mitchell's revival of Anton Chekhov's Ivanov at the National Theatre's Cottesloe Theatre in 2002; 'Bunty Mainwaring' in Michael Grandage's revival of Noel Coward's The Vortex at the Donmar Warehouse in 2002; 'Sylvia Morgan' in Michael Grandage' revival of Peter Nichols' Privates on Parade at the Donmar Warehouse in 2001; and 'Natasha' in Dominic Dromgoole's revival of Anton Chekhov's The Three Sisters at the Trafalgar Studios in 1999.

The original cast from 11 to 14 March 2020 featured Indira Varma as 'Arkadina', Daniel Monks as 'Konstantin', Robert Glenister as 'Sorin', Emilia Clarke as 'Nina', Seun Shote as 'Shamrayev', Tamzin Outhwaite as 'Polina', Sophie Wu as 'Masha', Tom Rhys Harries as 'Trigorin', Patrick Robinson as 'Dorn', and Danny Ashok as 'Medvedenko'.

Robert Glenister's London theatre credits include 'Andy' in Lyndsey Turner's revival of Harold Pinter's Moonlight at the Harold Pinter Theatre in 2018; 'Dave Moss' in Sam Yates' revival of David Mamet's Glengarry Glen Ross at the Playhouse Theatre in 2017; 'Wilson Tekkel' in Nicholas Hytner's production of Richard Bean's Great Britain at the National Theatre's Olivier Theatre in 2014 and transfer to the Haymarket Theatre in 2014; 'Lloyd Dallas' in Lindsay Posner's revival of Michael Frayn's Noises Off at the Old Vic Theatre in 2011 and transfer to the Novello Theatre in 2012; 'Duke Vincentio' in Michael Boyd's revival of William Shakespeare's Measure for Measure at the at the Barbican Theatre in 1999; 'Caliban' in Adrian Noble revival of William Shakespeare's The Tempest at the at the Barbican Theatre in 1999; 'Donald' in Patrick Marber's production of Dennis Potter's Blue Remembered Hills at the National Theatre's Lyttelton Theatre in 1996; and 'Daniel de Bosola' in Philip Franks' revival of John Webster's The Duchess of Malfi at the Wyndham's Theatre in 1995.

Tamzin Outhwaite's London theatre credits include 'Mavis' in Maria Friedman's revival of Richard Harris' Stepping Out at the Vaudeville Theatre in 2017; 'Teresa Phillips' in Alan Strachan's revival of Alan Ayckbourn's comedy How The Other Half Loves at the Haymarket Theatre, and Duke of York's Theatre in 2016; 'Di' in Anna Mackmin's production of Amelia Bullmore's Di and Viv and Rose at the Hampstead Theatre Studio in 2011, the Hampstead Theatre in 2013, and at the West End's Vaudeville Theatre in 2015; the title role in Matthew White's revival of the musical Sweet Charity at the Haymarket Theatre Royal in 2010; 'Gloria' in the original cast of Matthew Warchus' revival of Marc Camoletti's Boeing! Boeing! at the Comedy Theatre in 2007; the ensemble in the original cast of Sam Mendes' revival of Lionel Bart's Oliver! at the London Palladium in 1994; and the ensemble cast in David Gilmore's production of Noel Gay's Radio Times at the Queen's Theatre in 1992.

The Seagull in London at the Harold Pinter Theatre public previews from 29 June 2022, opens TBA, and closes on 10 September 2022


The UK Premiere of The Seagull took place on Tuesday 2 November 1909 at Royalty Theatre, Glasgow. Presented by the Glasgow Repertory Theatre for six performances in repertory from 2 to 9 November 1909 in a translation by George Calderon, the cast featured Mary Jerrold as 'Madame Arcadina', Milton Rosmer as 'Constantine Treplev', Laurence Hanray as 'Sorin', Irene Clark as 'Nina', Hubert Harben as 'Shamrayef', Marie Hudspeth as 'Pauline', Lola Duncan as 'Masha', Campbell Gullen as 'Trigorin', M R Morand as 'Dorn', and Perceval Clark as 'Medvedenko'.

The London Premiere of The Seagull took place for one performance on Sunday 31 March 1912 at the now demolished Little Theatre at Adelphi. The play was presented by The Adelphi Play Society, an independent organisation that was founded in June 1911 "for the private production of new plays, censored plays, and other play of artistic, educational, and ethical value."

Seven years later another independent theatre society, The Art Theatre, presented the play for two matinee performances in June 1919 at the Haymarket Theatre. Although the theatre was a 'West End' theatre, the two matinees where 'private private' given to members of The Art Theatre. Therefore the West End Premiere of The Seagull took place on Wednesday 25 September 1929 at the Fortune Theatre for a four-week run.

The longest-running West End production of The Seagull was Theodore Komisarjevsky's 1936 revival at the New Theatre which run for 109 performances. The longest-running London production was Charles Sturridge's 1985 revival at the Lyric Theatre in Hammersmith, and transfer to the New Theatre, which run for a combined total of 136 performances, plus 13 preview performances.

Interestingly Vanessa Redgrave has played in The Seagull in the West End twice, both times at the Queen's Theatre. The first time was in her husband's - Tony Richardson - 1964 revival when Vanessa played 'Nina', with her mother Rachel Kempson playing 'Polina'. The second time was in Charles Sturridge's 1985 revival when she played the role of 'Arkadina', with her daughter Natasha Richardson playing 'Nina'.

1912: LONDON PREMIERE with Princess Bariatinsky

1919: London Revival

1925: London Revival with John Gielgud

1929: London Revival with John Gielgud

1929: WEST END LONDON PREMIERE with Glen Byam Shaw

1936: 1st West End Revival with Edith Evans, Peggy Ashcroft and John Gielgud

1949: 2nd West End Revival with Paul Scofield

1953: London Revival

1956: 3rd West End Revival

1960: 4th West End Revival with Judith Anderson, Tom Courtenay, and Tony Britton

1964: 5th West End London Revival with Peggy Ashcroft, Vanessa Redgrave, and Rachel Kempson

1970: 6th West End London Revival (Russian)

1974: London Revival with Irene Worth and Robert Stephens

1975: 7th West End London Revival with Joan Plowright and Helen Mirren

1976: 8th West End London Revival with Georgina Hale and Alan Bates

1981: London Revival with Anna Massey, Harriet Walter, and Alan Rickman

1985: 9th West End London Revival with Vanessa Redgrave, Natasha Richardson, and Jonathan Pryce

1991: London Revival with Simon Russell Beale and Roger Allam

1994: London Revival with Judi Dench, Helen McCrory, and Bill Nighy

1997: 10th West End Revival with Felicity Kendal and Dominic West

1997: London Revival with Cheryl Campbell

2000: London Revival with Penelope Wilton

2006: London Revival with Juliet Stevenson and Ben Whishaw

2007: London Revival with Frances Barber and William Gaunt/Ian McKellen

2007: London Revival with Kristin Scott Thomas, Chiwetel Ejiofor, and Art Malik

2015: London Revival with Janie Dee

2016: London Revival with Anna Chancellor and Peter Egan


1912: LONDON PREMIERE with Princess Bariatinsky

Sunday 31 March 1912 (one performance) at the Little Theatre at Adelphi (now demolished)

Translated by George Calderon.

The cast featured Gertrude Kingston as 'Madame Arkcadina', Lawrence Anderson as 'Constantine Treplef', Leonard Calvert as 'Peter Sorin', Lydia Yavorska (AKA Princess Bariatinsky) as 'Nina', Leslie H. Gordon as 'Shamrayef', Hilda Honiss as 'Pauline', Mary Mackenzie as 'Masha', Maurice Elvey as 'Trigorin', Ross Shore as 'Eugene Dorn', and Campbell Cargill as 'Medvedenko'.

Directed by Maurice Elvey.

A 'private' performance presented by the Adelphi Play Society.

The 371-seater Little Theatre at Adelphi was located in a converted banking hall on the north side of John Street, now John Adam Street. An office block named 'Adelphi' now covers the area that included the theatre.


1919: London Revival

Sunday 1 and Monday 2 June 1919 (two matinee performances) at the Haymarket Theatre

Translated by Marion Fell.

The cast featured Helen Haye as 'Mme. Arkadina', Tom Nesbitt as 'Constantine', Leyton Cancellor as 'Peter Sorin', Margery Bryce as 'Nina', Ernest Warburton as 'Shamrayef', Madeline Clayton as 'Pauline', Irene Rathbone as 'Masha', Nicholas Hannen as 'Trigorin', Joseph A. Dodd as 'Eugene Dorn', and E H Paterson as 'Medvedenko'.

Directed and designed by Madame Donnet.

Presented for two 'private' afternoon matinee performances by The Art Theatre.


1925: London Revival with John Gielgud

Opened 19 October 1925 (no previews), Closed 5 December 1925 at the Little Theatre at Adelphi (now demolished)

Translated by Constance Garnett.

The cast featured Miriam Lewes as 'Irina Arkadin', John Gielgud as 'Konstantin Treplev', Hurbert Harben as 'Peter Sorin', Valerie Taylor as 'Nina', Ralph de Rohan as 'Shamrayef', Ina Cameron as 'Polina', Margaret Swallow as 'Masha', Randolph McLeod as 'Tregorin', Alexander Sarner as 'Yevgeny Dorn', and James Whale as 'Medvedenko'.

Directed by A E Filmer, with designs by James Whale.

The 371-seater Little Theatre at Adelphi was located in a converted banking hall on the north side of John Street, now John Adam Street. An office block named 'Adelphi' now covers the area that included the theatre.


1929: London Revival with John Gielgud

Opened 16 January 1929 (no previews), Closed 20 January 1929 at the Arts Theatre

Translated by Constance Garnett.

The cast featured Miriam Lewes as 'Irina Arkadin', John Gielgud as 'Konstantin Treplev', Stanley Lathbury as 'Pyotr Sorin', Valerie Taylor as 'Nina', Alan Webb as 'Shamrayef', Ina Cameron as 'Polina Andreyevna', Margaret Swallow as 'Masha', Henry Hewitt as 'Tregorin', Alexander Sarner as 'Yevgeny Dorn', and James Whale as 'Medvedenko'.

Directed by A E Filmer, with designs by James Whale.


1929: WEST END LONDON PREMIERE with Glen Byam Shaw

Opened 25 September 1929 (no previews), Closed 19 October 1929 at the Fortune Theatre

Translated by Constance Garnett.

The cast featured Miriam Lewes as 'Irina Arkadin', Glen Byam Shaw as 'Konstantin Treplev', Oliver Johnston as 'Pyotr Sorin', Valerie Taylor as 'Nina', Harold Young as 'Shamrayef', Dora Gregory as 'Polina', Margaret Swallow as 'Masha', Martin Lewis as 'Trigorin', Philip Godfrey as 'Yevgeny Dorn', and Henry Cass as 'Medvedenko'.

Directed by A E Filmer, with designs by James Whale.


1936: 1st West End Revival with Edith Evans, Peggy Ashcroft and John Gielgud

Opened 20 May 1936 (no previews), Closed 22 August 1936 at the New Theatre (now Noel Coward Theatre)

Translated by Theodore Komisarjevsky.

The cast featured Edith Evans as 'Irina Arkadin', Stephen Haggard as 'Constantin Treplef', Frederick Lloyd as 'Peter Sorin', Peggy Ashcroft as 'Nina', George Devine as 'Ilya Shamrayef', Clare Harris as 'Paulina', Martita Hunt as 'Masha', John Gielgud as 'Boris Trigorin', Leon Quartermaine as 'Dorn', and Ivor Barnard as 'Medvedenko'. The cast also included Alec Guinness as 'Workman'.

Directed and designed by Theodore Komisarjevsky.

At the time of rehearsals the short lived marriage of Peggy Ashcroft and Theodore Komisarjevsky had broken down causing some issues during the rehearsals.

This production proved very successful, running for a total of 109 performances, making this the West End's longest running production of The Seagull. It should be noted though that Charles Sturridge's 1985 revival is the longest running London production, if the pre-West End's run at London's Lyric Theatre in Hammersmith is included.

Both John Gielgud and George Devine left the cast in mid-July, to be replaced by Ion Swinley and Michael Brennan.


1949: 2nd West End Revival with Paul Scofield

Opened 4 October 1949 (no previews), Closed 12 November 1949 at the Lyric Hammersmith

Transferred 16 November 1949 (no previews), Closed 7 January 1950 at the St James's Theatre (now demolished)

Translated by George Calderon.

The cast at London's Lyric Theatre Hammersmith, and the West End's St James's Theatre Isabel Jeans as 'Irina Arkadin', Paul Scofield as 'Constantine', Philip Stainton as 'Sorin', Mai Zetterling as 'Nina', Richard Caldicot as 'Shamrayeff', Nuna Davey as 'Pauline', Hazel Terry as 'Masha', Ian Hunter as 'Trigorin', Nicholas Hannen as 'Dr Dorn', and John Kidd as 'Medvedenko'.

Directed by Irene Hentschel, with sets by Paul Sheriff, and costumes by William Chappell.

A 'Company of Four' production.

The 1,200-seater St James's Theatre was located in King Street, St James, opposite Bury Street.


1953: London Revival

Opened 23 April 1953 (no previews), Closed 17 May 1953 at the Arts Theatre

Translated by J P Davis.

The cast featured Catherine Lacey as 'Madame Treplyev', Michael Gwynn as 'Konstantin', Frederick Leister as 'Sorin', Jane Griffiths as 'Nina Zarechnaya', Willoughby Gray as 'Shamrayev', Noel Hood as 'Paulina', Jenny Laird as 'Masha', Alan MacNaughtan as 'Boris Trigorin', John Arnatt as 'Dorn', and Richard Warner as 'Medvedyenko'.

Directed by John Fernald, with sets by Disley Jones, and costumes by Michael Ellis.


1956: 3rd West End Revival

Opened 2 August 1956 (no previews), Closed 29 September 1956 at the Saville Theatre (now Odeon Covent Garden Cinema)

Translated by David Magarshack.

The cast featured Diana Wynyard as 'Irina Arkadina', Lyndon Brook as 'Konstantin', George Relph as 'Peter Sorin', Perlita Neilson as 'Nina', David Bird as 'Ilya Shamrayev', Kara Aldridge as 'Paulina', Jill Bennett as 'Masha', Hugh Williams as 'Boris Trigorin', Nicholas Hannen as 'Eugene Dorn', and John Bennett as 'Semyon Medvedenko'.

Directed by Michael MacOwen, with designs by Motley, and lighting by John Clements.


1960: 4th West End Revival with Judith Anderson, Tom Courtenay, and Tony Britton

Opened 1 September 1960 (no previews), Closed 1 October 1960 at the Old Vic Theatre

Translated by J P Davis, and presented by the Old Vic Company.

The cast included Judith Anderson as 'Irina Arkadin', Tom Courtenay as 'Konstantin Treplyev', Cyril Luckman as 'Peter Sorin', Ann Bell as 'Nina Zarechnaya', Gerald James as 'Shamrayev', Sylvia Coleridge as 'Paulina', Georgine Anderson as 'Masha', Tony Britton as 'Boris Trigorin', Ralph Michael as 'Doctor Dorn', and Derek Smith as 'Medvenyenko'.

Directed by John Fernald, with sets by Paul Mayo, and costumes by Beatrice Dawson.


1964: 5th West End London Revival with Peggy Ashcroft, Vanessa Redgrave, and Rachel Kempson

Opened 12 March 1964 (no previews), Closed 30 May 1964 at the Queen's Theatre (now Sondheim Theatre)

Translated by Ann Jellicoe.

The cast included Peggy Ashcroft as 'Irina Nikolayevna Arkadina', Peter McEnery as 'Constantin Gavrilovich Treplev', Paul Rogers as 'Pyotr Nikolayevich Sorin', Vanessa Redgrave as 'Nina Mikhailovna Zarechnaya', Mark Dignam as 'Ilya Afanasyevich Shamrayev', Rachel Kempson as 'Polina Andreyevna', Ann Beach as 'Masha', Peter Finch as 'Boris Alekeyevich Trigorin', George Devine as 'Yevgeny Sergeyevich Dorn', and Philip Locke as 'Semyon Semyonovich Medvedenko'.

Directed by Tony Richardson, with designs by Jocelyn Herbert.

Presented by the English Stage Company, while their home at the Royal Court Theatre was being renovated and refurbished.


1970: 6th West End London Revival (Russian)

Opened 25 May 1970 (no previews), Closed 6 June 1970 (in repertory) at the Aldwych Theatre

Performed in Russian by Moscow Art Theatre as part of Peter Daubeny's annual World Theatre Season.

Directed by Boris Nikolayevich Livanov, with sets by Enar Georgievich Stenberg, and costumes by Vera Ippolitovna Aralova.

Twelve performances as part of a two-week season which included four performances of Nikolai Pogodin's Lenin - The Third Pathetique.


1974: London Revival with Irene Worth and Robert Stephens

Previewed 30 January 1974, Opened 31 January 1974, Closed 2 May 1974 (in repertory) at the Greenwich Theatre

Translated by Elisaveta Fen.

The cast featured Irene Worth as 'Madame Arkadina', Peter Eyre as 'Konstantin', George Howe as 'Sorin', Maureen O'Brien as 'Nina', Antony Brown as 'Shamrayev', June Jago as 'Polena', Nicola Pagett as 'Masha', Robert Stephens as 'Trigorin', Anthony Nicholls as 'Dorn', and Philip Lowrie as 'Medvedenko'.

Directed by Jonathan Miller, with sets by Patrick Robertson, costumes by Rosemary Vercoe, and lighting by Nick Chelton.

Presented in repertory as part of a three-play Jonathan Miller Family Romances season, using the same company of actors, which included Henrik Ibsen's Ghosts (previewed from 16 January 1974, opened on 17 January 1974, and closed on 4 May 1974) and William Shakespeare's Hamlet (previewed from 13 March 1974, opened on 14 March 1974, and closed on 4 May 1974). There was a four-week break during the season when Minos Volonakis' revival of Jean Genet's The Maids was presented for a straight-run (previewed from 13 February 1974, opened on 14 February 1974, and closed on 9 March 1974).


1975: 7th West End London Revival with Joan Plowright and Helen Mirren

Previewed 22 October 1975, Opened 28 October 1975, Closed 28 April 1976 (in repertory) at the Lyric Theatre

Translated by Galina von Meck and Lindsay Anderson.

The cast featured Joan Plowright as 'Irina Arkadina', Frank Grimes as 'Konstantin', John Moffatt as 'Petya Sorin', Helen Mirren as 'Nina Zaryechnaia', Leonard Fenton as 'Shamrayev', Patsy Rowlands as 'Paulina Shamrayev', Patricia Healey as 'Masha', Peter McEnery as 'Boris Trigorin', Kevin Stoney as 'Dorn', and Neil Kennedy as 'Semion Medviedenko'.

Directed by Lindsay Anderson, with designs by Alan Tagg, and lighting by Joe Davis.

Presented by the 'Lyric Theatre Company' in as part of a two-play Ben Travers-Chekhov Season along with Lindsay Anderson's production of Ben Travers' The Bed Before Yesterday (previewed from 3 December 1975, opened on 9 December 1975, and closed on 30 April 1977). The two productions initially run together in repertory with the same company of actors. After The Seagull closed, The Bed Before Yesterday continued with a straight-run, with major cast changes on Monday 2 August 1976, and Monday 24 January 1977, with a cast holiday/break with no performances from Monday 17 January through to Saturday 22 January 1977.


1976: 8th West End London Revival with Georgina Hale and Alan Bates

Previewed 10 August 1976, Opened 11 August 1976, Closed 2 October 1976 at the Duke of York's Theatre

Translated by Mark Woolgar.

The cast featured Sheila Ballantine as 'Irina Arkadina', Richard O'Callaghan as 'Konstantin', Robert Flemyng as 'Peter Sorin', Georgina Hale as 'Nina', Denis Holmes as 'Shamrayev', Doreen Holmes as 'Polina', Gabrielle Lloyd as 'Masha', Alan Bates as 'Boris Trigorin', Leon Eagles as 'Yevgeny Sergeyevich Dorn', and Richard Denning as 'Simon Medvedenko'.

Directed by Mark Woolgar, with designs by Joe Vanek, and lighting by Nick Chelton.

A transfer from the Derby Playhouse.


1981: London Revival with Anna Massey, Harriet Walter, and Alan Rickman

Previewed 2 April 1981, Opened 8 April 1981, Closed 6 June 1981 at the Royal Court Theatre

Adapted by Thomas Kilroy.

The cast featured Anna Massey as 'Isobel Desmond' (Arkadina), Anton Lesser as 'Constantine Desmond' (Konstantin), Stuart Burge as 'Peter Desmond' (Sorin), Alan Devlin as 'Cousin Gregory' (Shamrayev), Maggie McCarthy as 'Pauline' (Polina), Harriet Walter as 'Lily' (Nina), Veronica Duffy as 'Mary' (Masha), Alan Rickman as 'Aston' (Trigorin), T P McKenna as 'Dr Hickey' (Dorn), and Tony Rohr as 'James' (Medvedenko).

Directed by Ma Stafford-Clark, with sets by Gemma Jackson, costumes by Pan Tait, lighting by Jack Raby, and sound by Mic Pool.

Presented by the English Stage Company, this adaptation moved the location from Russia to rural Ireland, with the characters renamed.


1985: 9th West End London Revival with Vanessa Redgrave, Natasha Richardson, and Jonathan Pryce

Previewed 22 April 1985, Opened 26 April 1985, Closed 1 June 1985 at the Lyric Theatre Hammersmith
Previewed 25 July 1985, Opened 2 August 1985, Closed 2 November 1985 at the Queen's Theatre (now Sondheim Theatre)

Translated by Charles Sturridge and Tania Alexander.

The cast at London's Lyric Theatre Hammersmith and the West End's Queen's Theatre featured Samantha Eggar as 'Irina Arkadina' (at Lyric), Vanessa Redgrave as 'Irina Arkadina' (at Queens), John Lynch as 'Konstantin', Alfred Burke as 'Piotr Sorin', Natasha Richardson as 'Nina', Roger Hammond as 'Shamraev' (at Lyric), Joseph Brady as 'Shamraev' (at Queens), Jean Rimmer as 'Polina', Phoebe Nicholls as 'Masha' (at Lyric), Julia Swift as 'Masha' (at Queens), John Hurt as 'Boris Trigorin' (at Lyric), Jonathan Pryce as 'Boris Trigorin' (at Queens), Ronald Hines as 'Dorn', and Peter Wright as 'Medvedenko'.

Directed by Charles Sturridge, with sets by Eileen Diss, costumes by Jane Robinson, lighting by Dave Horn, and music by Jason Osborn.

A co-production between the Lyric Hammersmith Theatre and the Oxford Playhouse, where this production was originally staged, with the same cast as the Lyric Hammersmith Theatre.

This was the longest running London production of The Seagull with a combined total 136 performances, plus 13 preview performances, for a total 149 performances. At London's Lyric Theatre, Hammersmith: 43 performances, with 5 preview performances. At the West End's Queen's Theatre: 93 performances, with 8 preview performances.


1991: London Revival with Simon Russell Beale and Roger Allam

Previewed 4 July 1991, Opened 11 July 1991, Closed 16 November 1991 (in repertory) at the Barbican Theatre

Translated by Michael Frayn.

The cast featured Susan Fleetwood as 'Arkadina', Simon Russell Beale as 'Konstantin', Alfred Burke as 'Sorin', Amanda Root as 'Nina', Trevor Martin as 'Shamrayev', Cherry Morris as 'Polina', Katy Behean as 'Masha', Roger Allam as 'Trigorin', John Carlisle as 'Dorn', and Graham Turner as 'Medvedenko'.

Directed by Terry Hands, with designs by Johan Engels, lighting by Terry Hands, music by Guy Woolfenden, and sound by Paul Slocombe.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company, this production was Terry Hands' 'farewell' production as Artistic Director of the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1994: London Revival with Judi Dench, Helen McCrory, and Bill Nighy

Previewed 1 July 1994, Opened 7 July 1994, Closed 3 December 1994 (in repertory) at the National Theatre's Olivier Theatre

Adapted by Pam Gems.

The cast featured Judi Dench as 'Arkadina', Alan Cox as 'Konstantin', Norman Rodway as 'Sorin', Helen McCrory as 'Nina', Robert Demeger as 'Shamrayev', Anna Calder-Marshall as 'Polina', Rachel Power as 'Masha', Bill Nighy as 'Trigorin', Edward Petherbridge as 'Dorn', and John Hodgkinson as 'Medvedenko'.

Directed by John Caird, with sets by John Gunter, costumes by Fotini Dimou, lighting by David Hersey, music by Dominic Mildowney, and sound by Paul Groothuis.

Presented by the National Theatre.


1997: 10th West End Revival with Felicity Kendal and Dominic West

Previewed 28 April 1997, Opened 9 May 1997, Closed 3 December 1997 (in repertory) at the Old Vic Theatre

Adapted by Tom Stoppard.

The cast featured Felicity Kendal as 'Irina Arkadina', Dominic West as 'Konstantin', Peter Blythe as 'Sorin', Victoria Hamilton as 'Nina', Peter Gordon as 'Shamrayev', Anna Carteret as 'Polina', Janine Duvitski as 'Masha', Michael Pennington as 'Trigorin', David Yelland as 'Dorn', and Greg Hicks as 'Medvedenko'.

Directed by Peter Hall, with sets by John Gunter, costumes by Liz Waller, lighting by Mark Henderson, and sound by Matt Mackenzie.

Presented by The Peter Hall Company.


1997: London Revival with Cheryl Campbell

Previewed 12 August 1997, Opened 14 August 1997, Closed 6 September 1997 at the Donmar Warehouse

Adapted by Stephen Mulrine.

The cast featured Cheryl Campbell as 'Madame Arkadina', Mark Bazeley as 'Konstantin', Arthur Cox as 'Sorin', Joanna Roth as 'Nina', Alan Leith as 'Shamraev', Sandra Duncan as 'Polina', Sarah-Jane Holm as 'Masha', Duncan Bell as 'Trigorin', Christopher Good as 'Dr Dorn', and Paul Slack as 'Medvedenko'.

Directed by Stephen Unwin, with designs by Pamela Howard, lighting by Ben Ormerod, music by Corin Buckeridge, and sound by Frank Bradley.

Presented by English Touring Theatre Company, this production transferred to London's Donmar Warehouse following a regional tour.


2000: London Revival with Penelope Wilton

Previewed 18 April 2000, Opened 25 April 2000, Closed 13 May 2000 at the Barbican Theatre

Translated by Peter Gill.

The cast featured Penelope Wilton as 'Arkadina', John Light as 'Konstantin', Richard Pasco as 'Sorin', Justine Waddell as 'Nina', Barry Stanton as 'Shamrayev', Gabrielle Lloyd as 'Polena', Niamh Linehlan as 'Masha', Nigel Terry as 'Trigorin', Richard Johnson as 'Dorn', and Mark Hadfield as 'Medvedenko', with Roger Parrott as 'Yakov', Ciaran McIntyre as 'Cook', Julie Neubert as 'Maid', Morgan Symes as 'Night Watchman', and Victoria Duarri as 'Maid'.

Directed by Adrian Noble, with choreography by Sue Lefton, designs by Vicki Mortimer, lighting by Paule Constable, music by Mia Soteriou, and sound by Mic Pool.


2006: London Revival with Juliet Stevenson and Ben Whishaw

Previewed 17 June 2006, Opened 27 June 2006, Closed 23 September 2006 (in repertory) at the National Theatre's Lyttelton Theatre

Adapted by Martin Crimp from a literal translation by Helen Rappaport.

The cast featured Juliet Stevenson as 'Arkadina', Ben Whishaw as 'Konstantin', Gawn Grainger as 'Sorin', Hattie Morahan as 'Nina', Michael Gould as 'Shamraev', Liz Kettle as 'Polina', Sandy McDade as 'Masha', Mark Bazeley as 'Trigorin', Angus Wright as 'Dorn', and Justin Salinger as 'Medvedenko', with Sean Jackson as 'Yakov', James Bolt, Beth Fitzgerald, and Jonah Russell.

Directed by Katie Mitchell, with choreography by Struan Leslie, sets by Vicki Mortimer, costumes by Nicky Gillibrand, lighting by Chris Davey, music by Simon Allen, and sound by Chrisopher Shutt.


2007: London Revival with Frances Barber and William Gaunt/Ian McKellen

Previewed 21 November 2007, Opened 27 November 2007, Closed 12 January 2008 (in repertory) at the New London Theatre (now Gillian Lynne Theatre)

The Royal Shakespeare Company present a major revival of Anton Chekhov's The Seagull in London

Presented in a new adaptation by Trevor Nunn and the company, and performed in repertory with William Shakespeare's King Lear.

The cast featured Frances Barber as 'Arkadina', Richard Goulding as 'Konstantin', William Gaunt or Ian McKellen as 'Sorin', Romola Garai as 'Nina', Guy Williams as 'Shamrayev', Melanie Jessop as 'Polina', Monica Dolan as 'Masha', Gerald Kyd as 'Trigorin', Jonanthan Hyde as 'Dr Dorn', and Ben Meyjes as 'Medvedenko', with Peter Hinton as 'Yakov', David Weston as 'Butler', Naomi Capron as 'Cook', Zoe Boyle as 'Maid', Adam Booth, Ben Addis, Julian Harries, John Heffernan, Philip Winchester, Russell Byrne, and Seymour Matthews.

Directed by Trevor Nunn, with designs by Christopher Oram, lighting by Neil Austin, music by Steven Edis, and sound by Fergus O'Hare.

William Gaunt played the role of 'Sorin' on the Opening Night. Ian McKellen played 'Sorin' at 10 evening performances on 23, 29 November, 4, 7, 10, 13, 18, 21, 29 December, and 1 January. William Gaunt played the role of 'Sorin' at all other performances: evenings on 21, 22, 27 November, 5, 12, 15, 19 December, 2, 5, and 9 January, and afternoon matinees on 24 November, 1, 8, 22 December, and 12 January.

This production of The Seagull was originally staged at the RSC's Courtyard Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon - previewed from 17 April 2007, opened on 31 May 2007, and closed on 23 June 2007 (in repertory) - with the same cast.

"Trevor Nunn's RSC production is... more notable for a few key individual performances than as a whole. Yet Nunn does bring out the play's uncomfortable interplay of tragedy and comedy, and emphasises - if a little too much - the play's fascination with theatre itself... Colourful though it is, Nunn's production is competent rather than inspired: painted in broad strokes rather than illuminating detail. Although you get a sense of people consumed by their desire for authenticity, the theatrics often ring hollow. Still, Monica Dolan gives a small but show-stealing turn as Masha - the alcoholic depressive eaten away by unrequited love." The London Metro

"Chekov's haunting tragic-comedy in this production seems less about the eroding dreams of artists than the cruelty of time. One of the play's mantras is 'Our time is running out', effectively repeated by Melanie Jessop's genuinely affecting Polina, whose plea to her lover, the suave Doctor Dom (Jonathan Hyde) to take her away from her wretched marriage is one of the most moving moments. But there are some wobbly performances. Gerald Kyd's Trigorin, for example, patently lacks the reptilian danger and focussed energy required for the role and Francis Barber's Arkadina is reduced to screeching too often to rise above the caricature of an ageing actress. There is, however, a greater coherence here that makes it a more satisfactory production than the errant King Lear, and Romola Garai has her moment in the sun in her closing speech that delivers the fatal blow to Konstantin." The Daily Express

"The focus in Chekhov's bleak tale ought to be on the domineering mother Arkadina and her neurotic and misunderstood son Konstantin, but neither Frances Barber nor Richard Goulding... are any match for a scene stealer of McKellen's calibre who crops up as Sorin. His preposterously ostentatious turn - fussy, effete, seemingly always fiddling with something - throws the whole production off balance... Miss Barber turns Arkadina into a shrieking banshee of a woman. She has none of the sense of faded grandeur that the part requires, and bereft of any obvious charm or sophistication, she seems an unconvincing magnet for the intellectuals and aesthetes who frequent her grand old house by the lake. Mr Goulding, for his part, is simply too hearty and one-dimensional an actor to play such a strange, creepy, doomed character. There is no chemistry between him and his mother... All in all, this is a very odd production indeed. Much of it is amusing, very little of it intentionally. The Sunday Telegraph

The Seagull in London at the New London Theatre previewed from 21 November 2007, opened on 27 November 2007 and closed on 12 January 2008 (in repertory)


2007: London Revival with Kristin Scott Thomas, Chiwetel Ejiofor, and Art Malik

Previewed 18 January 2007, Opened 25 January 2007, Closed 17 March 2007 at the Royal Court Theatre

Adaptation by Christopher Hampton, from a literal translation by Vera Liber.

The cast featured Kristin Scott Thomas as 'Arkadina', Mackenzie Crook as 'Konstantin', Peter Wight as 'Sorin', Carey Mulligan as 'Nina', Paul Jesson as 'Shamrayev', Denise Black as 'Polina', Katherine Parkinson as 'Masha', Chiwetel Ejiofor as 'Trigorin', Art Malik as 'Dorn', and Pearce Quigley as 'Medvedenko', with Christopher Patrick Nolan as 'Yakov', and Mary Rose as 'Maid'.

Directed by Ian Rickson, with designs by Hildegard Bechtler, lighting by Peter Mumford, music by Stephen Warbeck, and sound by Ian Dickinson.


2015: London Revival with Janie Dee

Previewed 19 June 2015, Opened 24 June 2015, Closed 11 July 2015 at the Regent's Park Open Air Theatre

A major revival of Anton Chekhov's The Seagull in London, in a new translation by Torben Betts, for a strictly limited three-week season

The cast featured Janie Dee as 'Irina Arkadina', Matthew Tennyson as 'Konstantin', Ian Redford as 'Peter Sorin', Sabrina Bartlett as 'Nina', Fraser James as 'Ilia Shamrayev', Lisa Palfrey as 'Paulina Andreevna', Lisa Diveney as 'Masha', Alex Robertson as 'Boris Trigorin', Danny Webb as 'Eugene Dorn', and Colin Hoult as 'Simon Medvedenko', with Tom Greaves as 'Yakov'.

Directed by Matthew Dunster, with choreography by Charlotte Broom, designs by Jon Bausor, lighting by Philip Gladwell, and sound by Christopher Shutt.

Janie Dee's London credits include Michael Blakemore's revival of Noel Coward's comedy Blithe Spirit which starred Angela Lansbury as 'Madame Arcati' at the Gielgud Theatre in 2014, Alan Ayckbourn's revival of his own play Woman in Mind at the Vaudeville Theatre in 2009, Michael Barker-Caven's revival of William Nicholson's play Shadowlands with Charles Dance at the Wyndham's Theatre in 2007, John Doyle's revival of Jerry Herman's musical Mack and Mabel with David Soul at the Criterion Theatre in 2006, Loveday Ingram's production of the Gershwin's My One and Only at the Piccadilly Theatre in 2002, and the Duke Ellington musical Sophisticated Ladies at the Globe Theatre in 1992.

Matthew Tennyson's West End credits include Trevor Nunn's revival of Terrace Rattigan's play Flare Path at the Haymarket Theatre in 2011.

Jon Bausor's London design credits include Jeremy Dyson's and Andy Nyman's play Ghost Stories (Duke of York's Theatre 2010, returned Arts Theatre 2014), William Golding's Lord of the Flies (Open Air Theatre 2011, returning 2015) and Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird (Open Air Theatre 2013, returned 2014, returns Barbican Theatre 2015).

When this production opened here at the Open Air Theatre in June 2015, Sam Marlowe in the Times said that "Chekhov designated The Seagull a comedy, and Matthew Dunster's bold, brisk production of Torben Betts's new version is often killingly funny. Yet it doesn't stint on the suffering... Matthew Dunster can be heavyhanded; there are overplayed gags and the foghorn sound effects that signal emotional intensity are superfluous. Yet this Seagull is beautifully situated and in the main it soars." Dominic Cavendish in the Daily Telegraph described how "Matthew Dunster's superbly acted revival of Anton Chekhov's first masterpiece for the theatre - sometimes so stuffily done, it's taxidermied - achieves the near-impossible: it jolts its audience awake with its dream-like action... and as the evening naturally darkens and the years hurtle by, collective disillusion gathering in the shadows, the soulful genius of Chekhov's drama takes glorious wing. Bravo." Fiona Mountford in the London Evening Standard thought that this is "exactly what the currently crest-of-a-wave Open Air Theatre should be putting on: a lively new version of a classic for, ideally, a wider audience than Russian playwrights tend to garner... As ever with director Matthew Dunster's work, there's a punchy energy and strong through-line of thought, perfectly mirrored by Torben Betts's earthy new adaptation which refuses to let everyone remain in an emotionally distant 19th-century world... This is a high-flying Seagull." Michael Billington in the Guardian wrote that "when it stops bombarding us with electronic sound effects and being quite so relentlessly frenetic, the production takes us closer to the heart of Chekhov's first great masterpiece." Patrick Marmion in the Daily Mail highlighted that "the most striking thing about Matthew Dunster's production is Jon Bausor's design. He sets a gigantic mirror over the stage, looming above the actors and giving a dislocated God-like view of the action. The visual effect is impressive, but the play itself is rendered somewhat flippant and declamatory, indulging the very melodrama it mocks." Sarah Hemming in the Financial Times commented how "throughout the production Matthew Dunster plays with irony and framework, emphasising the play's concerns with the relationship between life and art, between nature and artifice and highlighting Chekhov's remarkable prescience, both artistically and socially. It's a sharp, darkly funny and intriguing approach, though ultimately it begins to undermine the emotional impact of the play."

The Seagull in London at the Regent's Park Open Air Theatre previewed from 19 June 2015, opened on 24 June 2015, and closed on 11 July 2015


2016: London Revival with Anna Chancellor and Peter Egan

Previewed 23 July 2016, Opened 3 August 2016, Closed 8 October 2016 (in repertory) at the National Theatre's Olivier Theatre

Adaptation by David Hare, from a literal translation by Helen Rappaport.

The cast featured Anna Chancellor as 'Irina Arkadina', Joshua James as 'Konstantin', Peter Egan as 'Sorin', Olivia Vinall as 'Nina Zarechnaya', Des McAleer as 'Shamrayev', Debra Gillett as 'Polina', Jade Williams as 'Masha', Geoffrey Stretfeild as 'Boris Trigorin', Adrian Lukis as 'Evgeny Dorn', and Pip Carter as 'Medvedenko', with Luke Pierre as 'Yakov', Mark Donald as 'Workman', and Sarah Twomey as 'Maid'.

Directed by Jonathan Kent, with sets by Tom Pye, costumes by Emma Ryott, lighting by Mark Henderson, music by Jonathan Dove, and sound by Paul Groothuis.

Presented in repertory with Platonov and Ivanov, and performed by one ensemble of actors, as part of a three-play 'Young Chekhov Season' running from 14 July through to 8 October 2016. Prior to London the three-play 'Young Chekhov Season' was staged at the Chichester Festival Theatre in West Sussex, with the same cast, from 1 October to 14 November 2015. The Seagull previewed from 28 September 2015, opened on 17 September 2015, and closed on 14 November 2015.