Richard II

Play by William Shakespeare. Richard II, believing he's King by divine right, is confronted by rebellion. He becomes isolated, with a shrinking band of supporters, and detached from the country and its people. Shakespeare's play questions the meaning of 'monarchy' if a divinely appointed sovereign can be pushed aside, and a man with no such claim replaces him in power.

1969: West End London Revival with Ian McKellen and Timothy West (Prospect)

1972: West End London Revival with Ronald Pickup and Denis Quilley (NT)

1974: West End London Revival with Ian Richardson and Richard Pasco (RSC)

1981: London Revival with Nickolas Grace and Stuart Wilson (Young Vic)

1981: West End London Revival with Alan Howard and David Suchet (RSC)

1987: London Revival with Jeremy Irons and Michael Kitchen (RSC)

1988: West End London Revival with Derek Jacobi and David Rintoul (Triumph/Kennedy Center)

1989: West End London revival with Michael Pennington and Michael Cronin (ESC)

1991: London Revival with Alex Jennings and Anton Lesser (RSC)

1995: London Revival with Fiona Shaw and David Threlfall (NT)

2000: London Revival with Ralph Fiennes and Linus Roache (Almeida)

2000: London Revival with Samuel West and David Troughton (RSC)

2003: London Revival with Mark Rylance and Liam Brennan (Globe)

2005: West End London Revival with Kevin Spacey and Ben Miles (Old Vic)

2008: London Revival with Jonathan Slinger and Clive Wood (RSC)

2011: London Revival with Eddie Redmayne and Andrew Buchan (Donmar)

2012: London Revival with Sami Metwasi and Nicola Zreineh (Globe)

2013/2016: London Revival with David Tennant and Nigel Lindsay/Jasper Britton (RSC)

2015: London Revival with Charles Edwards and David Sturzaker (Globe)

2019: London Revival with Adjoa Andoh and Sarah Niles (Globe)


1969: West End London Revival with Ian McKellen and Timothy West (Prospect)

Opened 25 September 1969 (no previews), Closed 8 October 1969 (in repertory) at the Mermaid Theatre
Previewed 19 January 1970, Opened 20 January 1970, Closed 21 March 1970 (in repertory) at the Piccadilly Theatre

The cast at London's Mermaid Theatre and the West End's Piccadilly Theatre featured Ian McKellen as 'King Richard the Second', Lucy Fleming as 'Queen Isabel', Timothy West as 'Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford', Paul Hardwick as 'John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster', Robert Eddison as 'Edmund, Duke of York', Stephen Greif as 'Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk', Terence Wilton as 'Edward, Duke of Aumerle', Andrew Crawford as 'Bishop of Carlisle', Charmian Eyre as 'Duchess of Gloucester'/'Lady-in-Waiting', Colin Fisher as 'Sir John Bushy'/'Gardener's Man', David Calder as 'Groom'/'Lord Ross', David Nicholas as 'Servant to York' (Mermaid), Michael Howarth as 'Servant to York' (Piccadilly), James Laurenson as 'Sir Pierce of Exton', Jeremy Nicholas as 'Gardener's Man', John Cording as 'Servant to Exton' (Mermaid), Christopher Whitehouse as 'Servant to Exton' (Piccadilly), Luke Hardy as 'Sir William Bagot' (Mermaid), David Strong as 'Sir William Bagot' (Piccadilly), Michael Godfrey as 'Gardener'/'Keeper at Pomfret Castle', Michael Spice as 'Lord Willoughby', Myles Reithermann as 'Sir Henry Percy', Peggy Thorpe-Bates as 'Duchess of York', Peter Bourne as 'Abbot of Westminster'/'Sir Henry Green', Richard Morant as 'Earl of Salisbury', Stephen Greif as 'Owen Glendower', Trevor Martin as 'Henry, Earl of Northumberland', Michael Howarth, Nicholas Olivier, Nicol Gordon (Piccadilly), Nigel Crewe, Nigel Havers, and William Smith.

Directed by Richard Cottrell, with sets by Kenneth Rowell and Tim Goodchild, costumes by Tim Goodchild, lighting by John B Read, and music by Benjamin Pearce Higgins.

Presented by Prospect Theatre Company in repertory with Toby Robertson's revival of Christopher Marlowe's Edward the Second (with the same cast, featuring Ian McKellen in the title role), at London's Mermaid Theatre previewed from 23 September 1969, opened 24 September 1969, closed 11 October 1969, and transfer to the West End's Piccadilly Theatre previewed from 26 January 1970, opened on 27 January 1970, closed on 19 March 1970.

Prior to London this production was originally staged at the Cambridge Arts Theatre on 1 November 1968, followed by a regional tour, with a substantially different cast lead by Ian McKellen as 'Richard the Second', and Neil Stacy as 'Henry Bolingbroke'. It was then re-cast, as per above, and re-staged on 11 August 1969 at the Billingham Forum Theatre, followed by a short run at the Edinburgh Festival before transferring to London's Mermaid Theatre.

This production was especially filmed for television by the BBC at the London Studios, with the same cast as at the Mermaid Theatre, and was first broadcast on BBC Two TV on Thursday 30 July 1970.Edward the Second was also filmed by the BBC, but at the Piccadilly Theatre, with the same cast as at the Piccadilly Theatre, and was first broadcast on BBC Two TV on Thursday 6 August 1970.


1972: West End London Revival with Ronald Pickup and Denis Quilley (NT)

Previewed 28 March 1972, Opened 29 March 1972, Closed 30 September 1972 (in repertory) at the Old Vic Theatre

The cast featured Ronald Pickup as 'King Richard the Second', Anna Carteret as 'Queen Isabel', Denis Quilley as 'Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford', Michael Hordern as 'John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster', Kenneth Mackintosh as 'Edmund, Duke of York', John Shrapnel as 'Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk', Nicholas Clay as 'Edward, Duke of Aumerle', Alan MacNaughtan as 'Bishop of Carlisle', Allan Mitchell as 'Sir Stephen Scroop', Benjamin Whitrow as 'Sir John Bushy'/'Abbot of Westminster', Clive Merrison as 'Exton's Servant', David Bradley as 'York's Groom', David Henry as 'Lord Ross', David Ryall as 'Sir Piers of Exton', David Whitman as 'Lord Marshal', Desmond McNamara as 'Harry Percy', Gawn Grainger as 'Earl of Salisbury', Harry Lomax as 'Head Gardener', Harry Waters as 'Under Gardener', James Hayes as 'Groom', Jeanne Watts as 'Duchess of York', Jeremy Clyde as 'Sir Henry Green', Maggie Riley as 'Lady-in-Waiting', Malcolm Reid as 'Sir William Bagot', Mary Griffiths as 'Lady-in-Waiting', Paul Curran as 'Henry, Earl of Northumberland', Peter Rocca as 'Owen Glendower', Richard Howard as 'Under Gardener', Sheila Burrell as 'Duchess of Gloucester', and Stephen Greif as 'Lord Willoughby'.

Directed by David William, with designs by Michael Annals, lighting by Leonard Tucker, and music by Marc Wilkinson.


1974: West End London Revival with Ian Richardson and Richard Pasco (RSC)

Previewed 16 September 1974, Opened 18 and 19 September 1974, Closed 17 January 1975 (in repertory) at the Aldwych Theatre

The cast featured Richard Pasco as 'Richard II' or 'Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford', Ian Richardson as 'Richard II' or 'Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford', Janet Chappell as 'Queen Isabel', Tony Church as 'John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster'/'Henry, Earl of Northumberland' (up to Wednesday 2 October 1974), Clement McCallin as 'John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster'/'Henry, Earl of Northumberland (from Monday 21 October 1974), Sebastian Shaw as 'Edmund, Duke of York', Denis Holmes as 'Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk'/'First Gardener', Jonathan Kent as 'Edward, Duke of Aumerle', Albert Welling as 'Messenger', Gavin Campbell as 'Lord Willoughby', Hilda Braid as 'Duchess of York', Janet Whiteside as 'Duchess of Gloucester', John Boswall as 'Bishop of Carlisle', Julian Barnes as 'Sir Henry Percy (Hotspur)', Leon Tanner as 'Abbot of Westminster', Malcolm Armstrong as 'Third Gardener', Michael Ensign as 'Sir John Bushy', Philip Dunbar as 'Lord Ross', Ray Armstrong as 'Sir Henry Greene', Richard Mayes as 'Lord Marshal', Robert Ashby as 'Sir Piers of Exton', Wilfred Grove as 'Second Gardener', Deborah Fairfax, Doyne Byrd, Jean Gilpin, John Labanowski, and Mark Cooper.

Directed by John Barton, with designs by John Napier, Martyn Bainbridge and Ann Curtis, lighting by David Hersey, and music by James Walker.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Ian Richardson and Richard Pasco alternated the lead roles of 'Henry Bolingbroke' and 'Richard II' and there where therefore two 'First Night's: On Wednesday 18 September 1974 Richard Pasco played 'Richard II' and Ian Richardson played 'Henry Bolingbroke'; and on Thursday 19 September 1974 Ian Richardson played 'Richard II' and Richard Pasco played 'Henry Bolingbroke'.


1981: London Revival with Nickolas Grace and Stuart Wilson (Young Vic)

Previewed 18 February 1981, Opened 25 February 1981, Closed 26 March 1981 (in repertory) at the Young Vic Theatre

The cast featured Nickolas Grace as 'Richard II', Lynda Bellingham as 'Queen Isabel', Stuart Wilson as 'Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford', Robert Eddison as 'John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster', Clifford Rose as 'Edmund, Duke of York', Anthony Kay as 'Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk', Barry Evans as 'Edward, Duke of Aumerle', Andrew Wheaton as 'Keeper at Pomfret Castle'/'Sir John Bagot', Anthea Cooper as 'Gardener's Wife', Anthony Kay as 'Gardener', Donald Eccles as 'Earl of Salisbury'/'Priest', Joanna Wake as 'Duchess of Gloucester', John Warner as 'Henry, Earl of Northumberland', Judy Campbell as 'Duchess of York', Martin Ransley as 'Welsh Captain', Michael Rodden as 'Lord Fitzwater'/'Sir Henry Greene', Robert Eddison as 'Bishop of Carlisle', Tim Seely as 'Sir Piers of Exton', Tim Thomas as 'Abbot of Westminster'/'Sir John Bushy', and Tom Marshall as 'Sir Henry Percy'.

Directed by Robin Lefevre, with designs by Grant Hicks, and lighting by John B Read.


1981: West End London Revival with Alan Howard and David Suchet (RSC)

Previewed 5 November 1981, Opened 10 November 1981, Closed 13 March 1982 (in repertory) at the Aldwych Theatre

The cast featured Alan Howard as 'Richard II', Domini Blythe as 'Queen Isabel', David Suchet as 'Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford', Raymond Westwell as 'John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster', Tony Church as 'Edmund, Duke of York', John Bowe as 'Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk', Jonathan Hyde as 'Edward, Duke of Aumerle', Avril Clark as 'Duchess of Gloucester', Bille Brown as 'Sir Henry Green', Brett Usher as 'Sir Stephen Scroop', Bruce Purchase as 'Henry, Earl of Northumberland', Chris Hunter as 'Sir Henry Percy', Dennis Clinton as 'Gardener'/'Keeper at Pomfret Castle'/'Lord Berkeley', Eve Pearce as 'Duchess of York', Gordon Dulieu as 'Sir William Bagot', Jimmy Gardner as 'First Gardener's Man'/'Groom', Kilian McKenna as 'Duke of York's Servant', Michael Fitzgerald as 'First Murderer', Michael Siberry as 'Earl of Salisbury', Paul Webster as 'Abbot of Westminster'/'Sir Henry Bushy', Penelope Beaumont as 'First Lady-in-Waiting', Pip Miller as 'Sir William Ross', Richard Cordery as 'Lord Willoughby', Sara Moore as 'Second Lady-in-Waiting', Sion Tudor-Owen as 'Second Gardener's Man'/'Welsh Captain', Terry Wood as 'Lord Marshal'/'Sir Piers of Exton', Trevor Baxter as 'Bishop of Carlisle', and William Armstrong as 'Second Murderer'.

Directed by Terry Hands, with designs by Farrah, lighting by Terry Hands and Clive Morris, and music by Guy Woolfenden.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1987: London Revival with Jeremy Irons and Michael Kitchen (RSC)

Previewed 30 April 1987, Opened 5 May 1987, Closed 18 July 1987 (in repertory) at the Barbican Theatre

The cast featured Jeremy Irons as 'King Richard II', Denica Fairman as 'Queen Isabel', Michael Kitchen as 'Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford', Brewster Mason as 'John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster', Bernard Horsfall as 'Edmund, Duke of York', Richard Moore as 'Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk', Paul Venables as 'Edward, Duke of Aumerle', Christopher Ashley as 'Lord Fitzwater', David Glover as 'Sir Stephen Scroop'/'Abbot of Westminster', Edward Jewesbury as 'Earl of Salisbury', Eileen Page as 'Duchess of Gloucester'/'Lady-in-Waiting', Jane Lancaster as 'Lady-in-Waiting', John Burgess as 'Bishop of Carlisle', John Patrick as 'Gardener's Man'/'Sir Piers of Exton', Malcolm Hassall as 'Sir William Bagot', Mark Lindley as 'Duke of York's Servant', Nathaniel Parker as 'Harry Percy', Raymond Bowers as 'Sir Henry Bushy'/'Gardener', Richard Easton as 'Henry, Earl of Northumberland', Roger Moss as 'Groom', Roger Watkins as 'Lord Marshal'/'Welsh Captain', Rosalind Boxall as 'Duchess of York', Sean O'Callaghan as 'Duke of Surrey'/'Murderer/, Simon Cook as 'Sir Henry Green'/'Keeper at Pomfret Castle', Stan Pretty as 'Lord Willoughby', and Stanley Dawson as 'Lord Ross'.

Directed by Barry Kyle, with designs by William Dudley, lighting by Mark Henderson, and music by Stephen Oliver.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1988: West End London Revival with Derek Jacobi and David Rintoul (Triumph/Kennedy Center)

Previewed 24 November 1988, Opened 28 November 1988, Closed 7 January 1989 at the Phoenix Theatre
Returned 27 February 1989, Closed 6 May 1989 (in repertory) at the Phoenix Theatre

The cast featured Derek Jacobi as 'King Richard II', Kathryn Pogson as 'Queen Isabel', David Rintoul as 'Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford', Robert Eddison as 'John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster', Malcolm Tierney as 'Edmund, Duke of York', Pete Postlethwaite as 'Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk', Clive Arrindel as 'Edward, Duke of Aumerle', Adam Norton as 'Lord Fitzwater', Barbara Jefford as 'Duchesss of York', Graham Rowe as 'Attendant', Gwynn Beech as 'Sir John Bushey', Jan Dunn as 'Lady-in-Waiting', Jason Salkey as 'Gardener's Man', Jeffery Dench as 'Henry, Earl of Northumberland', Jennifer Thorne as 'Lady-in-Waiting', Leon Eagles as 'Lord Ross', Malcolm Mudie as 'Sir John Ba1ot', Patrick Marley as 'Earl of Salisbury', Pete Postlethwaite as 'Sir Piers of Exton'/'Gardener', Rachel Gurney as 'Duchess of Gloucester', Ray Llewellyn as 'Abbot of Westminster'/'Welsh Captain', Richard Wilkes as 'Lord Willoughby', Robert Swann as 'Bishop of Carlisle', Sam Miller as 'Sir Henry Percy', Scott Cherry as 'Keeper at Pomfret Prison'/'Sir Henry Green', and Tom Durham as 'Sir Stephen Scroop'/'Groom'.

Directed by Clifford Williams, with designs by Carl Toms, lighting by Mick Hughes, and music by Marc Wilkinson.

A co-production between Duncan Weldon and Paul Elliott's Triumph Theatre Productions, and the Kennedy Center, Washington DC.


1989: West End London revival with Michael Pennington and Michael Cronin (ESC)

Previewed 26 January 1989, Opened 27 January 1989, Closed 8 March 1989 (in repertory) at the Old Vic Theatre

The cast featured Michael Pennington as 'Richard II', Francesca Ryan as 'Queen Isabel', Michael Cronin as 'Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford', Clyde Pollitt as 'John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster', Colin Farrell as 'Edmund, Duke of York', Jack Carr as 'Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk'/'Sir Piers of Exton', Philip Bowen as 'Edward, Duke of Aumerle', Andrew Jarvis as 'Sir Henry Percy', Ann Penfold as 'Duchess of York', Barry Stanton as 'Welsh Captain', Ben Bezell as 'Earl of Westmorland', Charles Dale as 'Lord Willoughby', Hugh Sullivan as 'Bishop of Carlisle', Ian Burford as 'Duke of Exeter'/'Earl of Salisbury', Jenifer Konko as Lady-in-Waiting', John Darrell as 'Sir Stephen Scroop', John Dougall as 'Lord Ross', John Tramper as 'Keeper at Pomfret Prison', June Watson as 'Duchess of Gloucester', Michael Fenner as 'Sir Henry Greene', Paul Brennen as 'Sir John Bagot', Roger Booth as 'Henry, Earl of Northumberland', Simon Elliot as 'Servant to Exton', Sion Probert as 'Sir John Bushy', and Stephen Jameson as 'Lord Berkeley'.

Directed by Michael Bogdanov, with sets by Chris Dyer, costumes by Stephanie Howard, and lighting by Mark Henderson.

Presented by the English Shakespeare Company as the first play in The War of the Roses Season, a seven play repertory season running from 26 January 1989 to 11 March 1989 that included Henry IV part I, Henry IV part II, Henry V,Henry VI part I: House of Lancaster, Henry VI part II: House of York, and Richard III.


1991: London Revival with Alex Jennings and Anton Lesser (RSC)

Previewed 5 September 1991, Opened 10 September 1991, Closed 7 November 1991 (in repertory) at the Barbican Theatre

The cast featured Alex Jennings as 'Richard II', Valentina Yakunina as 'Queen Isabel', Anton Lesser as 'Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford', Alan MacNaughtan as 'John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster', Bernard Lloyd as 'Edmund, Duke of York', Mike Dowling as 'Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk', Peter De Jersey as 'Edward, Duke of Aumerle', Alec Linstead as 'Gardener'/'Lord Ross', Andrew Havill as 'Sir William Bagot', Bernard Wright as 'Sir Stephen Scroope', Bill McGuirk as 'The Lord of Berkeley', Callum Dixon as 'Boy'/'Groom'/'Second Herald', Dominic Mafham as 'Lord Fitzwater'/'Sir John Bushy', Edward Max as 'Keeper at Pomfret Castle', Jamie Hinde as 'Gardener's Man'/'First Herald', Jayne Boniface as 'Second Lady-in-Waiting', John Bott as 'Bishop of Carlisle', John Hodgkinson as 'Exton's Man'/'Welsh Captain', Margaret Robertson as 'Duchess of Gloucester', Marjorie Yates as 'Duchess of York', Michael Bott as 'Duke of Surrey', Paul Jesson as 'Henry, Earl of Northumberland', Penny Jones as 'Sister of Mercy', Richard Avery as 'Abbot of Westminster'/'Lord Willoughby', Shura Greenberg as 'Duke of York's Serving Man', Stephen Casey as 'Harry Percy', Tessa Dickinson as 'First Lady-in-Waiting', and Vincent Regan as 'Sir Henry Green'/'Sir Piers of Exton'.

Directed by Ron Daniels, with designs by Antony McDonald, lighting by James F Ingalls, music by by Orlando Gough, and sound by Charles Horne.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1995: London Revival with Fiona Shaw and David Threlfall (NT)

Previewed 26 May 1995, Opened 2 June 1995, Closed 17 February 1996 (in repertory) at the National Theatre's Cottesloe Theatre (now Dorfman Theatre)

The cast featured Fiona Shaw as 'Richard II', Brana Bajic as 'Queen Isabel', David Threlfall as 'Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford', Graham Crowden as 'John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster', Michael Bryant as 'Edmund, Duke of York', David Lyon as 'Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk'/'Earl of Salisbury', Julian Rhind-Tutt as 'Edward, Duke of Aumerle', Danny Sapani as 'Sir William Bagot'/'Welsh Captain', Elaine Claxton as 'Second Lady-in-Waiting', Henry Ian Cusick as 'Sir Henry Green'/'Piers of Exton's Man'/'First Gardener's Man', Jem Wall as 'Second Herald'/'Duke of York's Serving Man'/'Second Gardener's Man', John McEnery as 'Lord Willoughby'/'Keeper at Pomfret Castle'/'Head Gardener', John Rogan as 'The Lord Marshal'/'Bishop of Carlisle', Jonathan Slinger as 'Sir Henry Percy'/'First Herald', Jude Akuwudike as 'Sir Stephen Scroop'/'Lord Fitzwater', Nicholas Gecks as 'Sir John Bushy'/'Thomas, Duke of Surrey', Paola Dionisotti as 'Duchess of Gloucester'/'Duchess of York'/'First Lady-in-Waiting', Richard Bremmer as 'Lord Ross'/'Abbot of Westminster'/'Sir Piers of Exton', and Struan Rodger as 'Henry, Earl of Northumberland'.

Directed by Deborah Warner, with designs by Hildegard Bechtler, lighting by Peter Mumford, music by Arturo Annecchino, and sound by Freya Edwards.


2000: London Revival with Ralph Fiennes and Linus Roache (Almeida)

Previewed 30 March 2000, Opened 12 April 2000, Closed 5 August 2000 (in repertory) at the Gainsborough Studios

The cast featured Ralph Fiennes as 'King Richard', Emilia Fox as 'Queen Isabel', Linus Roache as 'Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford', David Burke as 'John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster', Oliver Ford Davies as 'Edward, Duke of York', Paul Moriarty as 'Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk', Oliver Ryan as 'Edward, Duke of Aumerle', Alan David as 'Captain'/'Gardener', Alex Sims as 'Attendant', Angela Down as 'Duchess of Gloucester', Barbara Jefford as 'Duchess of York', Bernard Gallagher as 'Bishop of Carlisle', Damian O'Hare as 'First Gardener's Man'/'Duke of York's Man'/'First Herald', Danielle King as 'Lady-in-Waiting', David Fahm as 'Sir John Bushy'/'Pierce of Exton's Man', Ed Waters as 'Sir Henry Green'/'Second Gardener's Man', Ian Barritt as 'Lord Marshal', John Bennett as 'Sir Pierce of Exton', Marc Small as 'Attendant', Paul Benzing as 'Keeper at Pomfret Castle'/'Attendant', Philip Dunbar as 'Lord Ross'/'Duke of Surrey'/'Groom', Roger Swaine as 'Earl of Salisbury'/'Abbot of Westminster', Sean Baker as 'Sir William Bagot', Stephen Campbell Moore as 'Henry, Earl of Northumberland'/'Second Herald', and Stephen Finegold as 'Lord Willoughby'/'Lord Fitzwater'.

Directed by Jonathan Kent, with designs by Paul Brown, lighting by Mark Henderson, music by Jonathan Dove, and sound by John A Leonard.

Presented by the Almeida Theatre at the Gainsborough Studios, Shoreditch, in repertory with William Shakespeare's Coriolanus.


2000: London Revival with Samuel West and David Troughton (RSC)

Previewed 19 December 2000, Opened 21 December 2000, Closed 17 April 2001 at the Barbican Pit Theatre

The cast featured Samuel West as 'Richard II', Catherine Walker as 'Queen Isabel', David Troughton as 'Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford', Alfred Burke as 'John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster', David Killick as 'Edward, Duke of York', Paul Greenwood as 'Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk'/'Bishop of Carlisle', Alexis Daniel as 'Edward, Duke of Aumerle', Adam Levy as 'Harry Percy', Christopher Saul as 'Henry, Earl of Northumberland', Dickon Tyrrell as 'Sir William Bagot', Janet Whiteside as 'Duchess of Gloucester'/'Duchess of York', Keith Dunphy as 'Lord Ross', Paul McEwan as 'Sir John Bushy'/'Sir Pierce of Exton', Sam Cox as 'Lord Willoughby', Tim Treloar as 'Gardener'/'Welsh Captain'/'Groom', William Buckhurst as 'Sir Henry Green'/'Keeper at Pomfret Castle'/'Gardener's Man', and William Whymper as 'Earl of Salisbury'/'Abbot of Westminster'/'Lord Marshal'.

Directed by Steven Pimlott, with designs by Sue Willmington with David Fielding, lighting by Simon Kemp, music by Jason Carr, and sound by Andrea J Cox.


2003: London Revival with Mark Rylance and Liam Brennan (Globe)

Previewed 8 May 2003, Opened 14 May 2003, Closed 27 September 2003 (in repertory) at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The cast featured Mark Rylance as 'King Richard II', Michael Brown as 'Queen Isabel', Liam Brennan as 'Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford', John McEnery as 'John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster', Chu Omambala as 'Edward, Duke of York', Terry McGinity as 'Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk', Albie Woodington as 'Sir Henry Percy', Bill Stewart as 'Edmund of Langley', Gerald Kyd as 'Sir Harry Percy', Justin Shevlin as 'Sir John Bushy', Pater Shorey as 'Sir William Ross', Patrick Brennan as 'Sir William Bagot'/'Welsh Captain', Patrick Toomey as 'Earl of Salisbury'/'Servingman to the Duke of York', Richard Glaves as 'Sir Henry Green', and William Osborne as 'Duchess of Gloucester'/'Sir William Willoughby'.

Directed by Tim Carroll, with choreography by Sian Williams and Glynn MacDonald, sets by Jenny Tiramani, costumes by Luca Costigliolo and Jenny Tiramani, and music by Clare Van Kampen.


2005: West End London Revival with Kevin Spacey and Ben Miles (Old Vic)

Previewed 14 September 2005, Opened 4 October 2005, Closed 26 November 2005 at the Old Vic Theatre

A majr revival of William Shakespeare's Richard II in London starring Kevin Spacey

A modern dress/contemporary production by Trevor Nunn.

The cast featured Kevin Spacey as 'Richard II', Genevieve O'Reilly as 'Queen Isabel', Ben Miles as 'Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford', Julian Glover as 'John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster', Peter Eyre as 'Edward, Duke of York', Sean Baker as 'Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk'/'Earl of Salisbury', Oliver Kieran-Jones as 'Edward, Duke of Aumerle', Alistair Robins as 'Lord Ross', Ciaran McIntyre as 'Lord Berkeley'/'Gardener', David Collings as 'Sir Henry Green'/'Duke of Surrey', David Dawson as 'Groom', David Leon as 'Harry Percy' ,David Weston as 'Lord Willoughby', Glyn Williams as 'Gardener's Assistant', Iain Mitchell as 'Sir John Bushy'/'Abbot of Westminster', Jack James as 'Lord Marshal/Welsh Captain/Keeper at Pomfret Castle', Kieran Bew as 'Sir Piers of Exton', Lewis Barfoot as 'Second Lady-in-Waiting', Mark Tandy as 'Sir Stephen Scroop', Naomi Capron as 'First Lady-in-Waiting', Oliver Cotton as 'Henry, Earl of Northumberland', Sidney Livingstone as 'Bishop of Carlisle', Steven Miller as 'Gardener's Assistant', Susan Tracy as 'Duchess of York', and William Osborne as 'Sir William Bagot'.

Directed by Trevor Nunn, with designs by Hildegard Bechtler, video by Dick Straker and Sven Ortel, lighting by Peter Mumford, and sound by Fergus O'Hare.

Julian Glover's London theatre credits include the roles of 'Sir' in Peter Hall's revival of Ronald Harwood's The Dresser at the Duke of York's Theatre in 2005; 'Duncan' in Edward Hall's revival of William Shakespeare's Macbeth at the Albery Theatre in 2003; the title role in Barry Byle's revival of William Shakespeare's King Lear at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre in 2001; 'Vladimir' in Peter Hall's revival of Samuel Beckett's Waiting For Godot at the Piccadilly Theatre in 1998; 'Arthur Birling' in Stephen Daldry's landmark revival of J B Priestley's An Inspector Calls at the Aldwych Theatre in 1993; 'Comte de Guiche' in Elijah Moshinsky's revival of Edmond Rostand's Cyrano de Bergerac at the Theatre Royal Haymarket in 1992; 'Jason' in Mary McMurray's revival of Euripides' Medea at the Lyric Hammersmith in 1986; 'Archie' in Peter Wood's production of Tom Stoppard's Jumpers at the Lyttelton Theatre in 1976; and 'Jeff' in Harold Pinter's production of Simon Gray's Otherwise Engaged at the Queen's Theatre in 1975.

Sean Baker's London theatre credits include 'Candy' in Jonathan Church's revival of John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men at the Old Vic Theatre in 2004; 'Bishop of London' in John Caird's revival of Jean Anouilh's Becket at the Haymarket Theatre in 2004; 'Duke Vincentio' in Stephanie Braunschweig's revival of William Shakespeare's Measure for Measure at the Barbican Theatre in 1998; 'Banquo' in Michael Bogdanov's revival of William Shakespeare's Macbeth at the Royalty Theatre in 1992; 'Stefano' in Michael Bogdanov's revival of William Shakespeare's The Tempest at the Royalty Theatre in 1992; 'Cassio' in Trevor Nunn's revival of William Shakespeare's Othello at the Young Vic Theatre in 1989; 'Le Chevalier Danceny' in the original cast of Howard Davies' production of Christopher Hampton's adaptation of Choderlos de Laclos' Les Liaisons Dangereuses at the Barbican Pit Theatre in 1986; and 'Paris' in Howard Davies' revival of William Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida at the Barbican Theatre in 1986.

Although Trevor Nunn has directed 30 of Shakespeare's 37 plays, this is the first time he has directed this Shakespeare play.

"In Trevor Nunn's eagerness to make the play relevant to a 2005 audience he loses the symbolic significance, giving us a powergame but not a lot else. Except of course the players. Nunn has assembled a powerful team to support Kevin Spacey, with Julian Glover as a fiercely moribund John of Gaunt, Peter Eyre as the more cautious Duke of York, Ben Miles as Bolingbroke and Sean Baker as Mowbray. Ihis is not in any traditional sense a classical company, nor do they yet have a house style, but the rough-edged nature of Nunn's production suits them. The video screens can sometimes prove a distraction... The real danger here is of gimmickry, of doing something just to grab audience attention... Ihis is the first time Trevor Nunn has directed the play, and it is Kevin Spacey's European Shakespearean debut. In that sense the men are finding their way through the text, and if it's also your introduction to the play, this Richard will serve very well." The Daily Express

"At last, after a dismal start to his reign as artistic director of the Old Vic, Kevin Spacey proves himself worthy of his crown. His Richard II, his first stab at Shakespeare, powerfully directed by Trevor Nunn, is a return to grace and greatness... Nunn is splendidly alert to one of the play's themes, the gap between the public face of leaders and their private reality, hence the ever-present reporters with cameras and video footage played and replayed often in contradiction to what is actually happening... While Spacey dominates the stage, there are some superb supporting performances from Julian Glover and Peter Eyre as the old guard torn between loyalty to their sovereign and their sense of justice. Best of all is Ben Miles's Bolingbroke... He's a man on the make, who, like Richard, discovers that it is very lonely at the top." The Mail on Sunday

"The problem with Richard II is that Shakespeare never made it terrifically clear whether this king was a bad king or just not a particularly good king. Spacey and Nunn have made him a not particularly good one who does an all right job while getting an ironic queenie kick out of all the sceptre and orb business... This is a modem-day production; key speeches are made to camera and played back as newsreel on video screens... When Julian Glover (John of Gaunt) delivers his "sceptr'd isle" speech he declaims magnificently from a wheelchair, directly to camera, and the playback is strategically edited for the newsreels as his son, the exiled Bolingbroke (Ben Miles), wearing sexy black combat gear, returns to England to revenge and overthrow. Miles's Bolingbroke is cold and clinical, but, you feel, perhaps it is only by necessity that he fails to show compassion at the spectacle of Richard going down noisily. Spacey shouts but he is also tearful, and, though Bolingbroke succeeds in holding back, it is harder for the audience not to feel really sorry for him." The Sunday Telegraph

Trevor Nunn on the play: "For Richard II you need an actor who is capable of flamboyant roleplaying, of expressing every kind of mood and indulgence. But he also has to be interested in a character's interior life, because by the end of the play that's all that Richard is left with. Kevin Spacey has shown that he can deliver fantastic pizzazz, but his greatest strength lies in his ability to strip away a character's layers, to show what's really going on underneath. Despite his film stardom he's a genuine stage actor. The play asks a large number of vital questions about our country, our history, our traditions and institutions. It was politically dangerous when Shakespeare wrote it because, as far as Queen Elizabeth was concerned, everything about the succession was speculative and unresolved. People were asking questions about the future of the monarchy, and what would happen if rebellion took place in the country. After Elizabeth's death, the play went unperformed for a very long time. But it came back into favour in the last century; during the 1936 abdication crisis for example it seemed to have a disturbing relevance. We live in a questioning age, at a time when everything about our institutions is being seriously challenged. There's the issue of the monarchy and the republican debate. There are arguments about our parliamentary system: is it any longer valid, or just a kind of circus, a medieval showcase? People also question our fancy-dress legal system, and whether trial by jury is viable. These are all issues which lend Shakespeare's play an unexpected relevance."

Richard II in London at the Old Vic Theatre previewed from 14 September 2005, opened on 4 October 2005, and closed on 26 November 2005.


2008: London Revival with Jonathan Slinger and Clive Wood (RSC)

Previewed 1 April 2008, Opened 15 April 2008, Closed 22 May 2008 (in repertory) at the Roundhouse

The cast featured Jonathan Slinger as 'King Richard II', Hannah Barrie as 'Queen Isabel', Clive Wood as 'Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford', Roger Watkins as 'John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster', Richard Cordery as 'Edmund, Duke of York', John Mackay as 'Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk', James Tucker as 'Edward, Duke of Aumerfe', Ann Ogbomo as 'Lady-in-Waiting', Anthony Shuster as 'Sir Henry Green', Chuk Iwuji as 'Duke of Gloucester', Forbes Masson as 'Sir William Bagot', Katy Stephens as 'Duchess of Gloucester', Keith Bartlett as 'Sir Henry Percy', Lex Shrapnel as 'Harry Percy', Luke Neal as 'Lord Vernon', Maureen Beattie as 'Duchess of York', Nicholas Asbury as 'Henry Bushy'/'Abbot of Westminster', Rob Carroll as 'Lord Ross', and Sandy Neilson as 'Bishop of Carlisle'.

Directed by Michael Boyd, with movement by Liz Ranken, designs by Tom Piper, lighting by Heather Carson, music by James Jones, and sound by Andrea J Cox.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company at the Roundhouse in North London as part of the 2006 Histories Cycle.


2011: London Revival with Eddie Redmayne and Andrew Buchan (Donmar)

Previewed 1 December 2011, Opened 6 December 2011, Closed 4 February 2012 at the Donmar Warehouse

The cast featured Eddie Redmayne as 'Richard II', Pippa Bennett-Warner as 'Queen Isabel', Andrew Buchan as 'Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford', Michael Hadley as 'John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster'/'Gardener'/'Keeper at Pomfret Castle', Ron Cook as 'Edmund, Duke of York', Ben Turner as 'Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk'/'Earl of Salisbury', Ashley Zhangazha as 'Edward, Duke of Aumerle'/'Groom', Daniel Easton as 'Sir William Bagot', Daniel Flynn as 'Henry, Earl of Northumberland', Harry Attwell as 'Sir Pierce of Exton', Joseph Timms as 'Harry Percy', Michael Marcus as 'Sir John Bushy'/'Abbot of Westminster', Phillip Joseph as 'Welsh Captain'/'Bishop of Carlisle', Sean Jackson as 'Lord Fitzwater', Sian Thomas as 'Duchess of Gloucester'/'Duchess of York', and Stefano Braschi as 'Sir Henry Green'/'Sir Stephen Scroop'/'Gardener's Man'.

Directed by Michael Grandage, with designs by Richard Kent, lighting by David Plater, and music and sound by Adam Cork.


2012: London Revival with Sami Metwasi and Nicola Zreineh (Globe)

Friday 4 and Saturday 5 May 2012 at Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

Performed in Arabic, translated by Bayan Shbib and Iman Aoun.

The cast featured Sami Metwasi as 'King Richard II', Bayan Shbib as 'Queen Isabel', Nicola Zreineh as 'Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford', Hussein Nakhleh as 'John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster', Ihab Zahdeh as 'Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk'/'Welsh Captain'/'Guard', Firas Farah as 'Edward, Duke of Aumerle', Amer Khalil as 'Sir William Bagot', Edward Muallem as 'Henry, Earl of Northumberland', George Ibrahim as 'Duke of Gloucester'/'Edmund, Duke of York', Iman Aoun as 'Duchess of Gloucester'/'Gardnerís wife', Iyad Hurani as 'Sir Henry Percy', Mohammad Eid as 'Lord Ross', and Raed Ayasa as 'Sir Henry Green'/'Gardener'.

Directed by Conall Morrison, with designs by Rajha Shakiry, and music by Majaz Album and Trio Jubran.

Two performances presented by the Ashtar Theatre, Ramallah as part of the Globe-to-Globe 2012 Season.


2013/2016: London Revival with David Tennant and Nigel Lindsay/Jasper Britton (RSC)

Previewed 9 December 2013, Opened 12 December 2013, Closed 25 January 2014 (in repertory) at the Barbican Theatre
Returned 7 January 2016, Closed 22 January 2016 (in repertory) at the Barbican Theatre

The 2013 cast featured David Tennant as 'Richard II', Emma Hamilton as 'Queen Isabel', Nigel Lindsay as 'Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford', Michael Pennington as 'John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster', Oliver Ford Davies as 'Edmund, Duke of York', Antony Byrne as 'Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk', Oliver Rix as 'Edward, Duke of Aumerle', Edmund Wiseman as 'Harry Percy', Elliot Barnes-Worrell as 'Groom', Gracy Goldman as 'Lady-in-Waiting', Jake Mann as 'Sir William Bagot', Jane Lapotaire as 'Duchess of Gloucester', Jim Hooper as 'Bishop of Carlisle', Joshua Richards as 'Lord Ross'/'Lord Marshal', Keith Osborn as 'Sir Stephen Scroop', Marcus Griffiths as 'Sir Henry Green', Marty Cruickshank as 'Duchess of York', Miranda Nolan as 'Lady-in-Waiting', Sam Marks as 'Sir John Bushy', Sean Chapman as 'Henry, Earl of Northumberland', Simon Thorp as 'Earl of Salisbury', and Youssef Kerkour as 'Lord Willoughby'.

The 2016 cast featured David Tennant as 'Richard II', Leigh Quinn as 'Queen Isabel', Jasper Britton as 'Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford', Julian Glover as 'John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster', Oliver Ford Davies as 'Edmund, Duke of York', Christopher Middleton as 'Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk', Sam Marks as 'Edward, Duke of Aumerle', Andrew Westfield as 'Lord Willoughby', Dale Mathurin as 'Herald', Daniel Abbott as 'Groom', Emma King as 'Lady-in-Waiting', Evelyn Miller as 'Lady-in-Waiting', Jane Lapotaire as 'Duchess of Gloucester', Jim Hooper as 'Bishop of Carlisle', Joshua Richards as 'Gardener'/'Captain', Keith Osborn as 'Sir Stephen Scroop'/'Abbot of Westminster', Martin Bassindale as 'Sir John Bushy', Matthew Needham as 'Harry Percy', Nicholas Gerard-Martin as 'Sir William Bagot', Obioma Ugoala as 'Keeper at Pomfret Castle', Robert Gilbert as 'Sir Henry Green', Sarah Parks as 'Duchess of York', Sean Chapman as 'Henry, Earl of Northumberland', Simon Thorp as 'Lord Marshal'/'Earl of Salisbury', and Simon Yadoo as 'Lord Ross'.

Directed by Gregory Doran, choreography by Mike Ashcroft, designs by Stephen Brimson Lewis, lighting by Tim Mitchell, music by Paul Englishby, and sound by Martin Slavin.

The 2016 return season comprised of nine performances: Five performances from Thursday 7 to Sunday 10 January 2016, followed by a further four performances as the first play in the King and Country Play Cycle, with Henry IV Parts I and II and Henry V, which was staged to mark the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare's death (12 to 14, 15 to 17, 19 to 21, 22 to 24 January 2016).


2015: London Revival with Charles Edwards and David Sturzaker (Globe)

Previewed 11 July 2015, Opened 22 July 2015, Closed 18 October 2015 (in repertory) at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The cast featured Charles Edwards as 'Richard II', Anneika Rose as 'Queen Isabel', David Sturzaker as 'Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford', William Gaunt as 'John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster', William Chubb as 'Edmund, Duke of York', Oliver Boot as 'Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk'/'Bishop of Carlisle', Graham Butler as 'Edward, Duke of Aumerle', Angus Imrie as 'Sir William Bagot', Arthur Wilson as 'Sir Henry Green', Ekow Quartey as 'Lord Ross', Greg Haiste as 'Sir John Bushy', Henry Everett as 'Earl of Salisbury', Jonny Glynn as 'Henry, Earl of Northumberland', Richard Katz as 'Sir Pierce of Exton'/'Gardener', Sarah Woodford as 'Duchess of York', Sasha Waddell as 'Duchess of Gloucester', Anthony Pinnick, Joshua Mason Wood, and Kate Malyon. Thomas Ashdown and Frederick Neilson shared the role of 'Young Richard'.

Directed by Simon Godwin, with designs by Paul Wills, and music by Stephen Warbeck.


2019: London Revival with Adjoa Andoh and Sarah Niles (Globe)

Previewed 22 February 2019, Opened 6 March 2019, Closed 21 April 2019 at the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The cast featured Adjoa Andoh as 'Richard II', Leila Farzad as 'Queen Isabel', Sarah Niles as 'Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford', Dona Croll as 'John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster'/'Duchess of York', Shobna Gulati as 'Edmund, Duke of York', Indra Ove as 'Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk'/'Henry, Earl of Northumberland', Ayesha Dharker as 'Edward, Duke of Aumerle', Lourdes Faberes as 'Sir William Bagot'/'Lord Ross'/'Sir Pierce of Exton'/'Gardener's Help', Nicholle Cherrie as 'Sir Henry Green'/'Sir Henry Percy'/'Groom', and Sarah Lam as 'Duchess of Gloucester'/'Sir John Bushy'/'Lord Willoughby'/'Gardener'.

Directed by Adjoa Andoh and Lynette Linton, with movement by Yarit Dor, designs by Rajha Shakiry, costumes by Rianna Azoro, lighting by Prema Mehta, and music by Dominique Le Gendre.

An all-women of colour production.

Lighting by candles.