Miss Julie

Play by August Stringberg. It's Midsummer's Eve in the kitchen of a nobleman's house and his aristocratic daughter Julie flirts and plays with Jean, her father's valet. But it's a dangerous game and once she has been seduced by him, the sexual thrill has dissipated, and now it is he that holds the upper hand.

This play had it's West End London Premiere with one Sunday private performance held at the Little Theatre in 1912 by the Adelphi Play Society. In 1925 the Lord Chamberlain refused to license the play for 'public performance' on the stage, therefore effectively 'banning' the play. Although there where a couple of productions of the play in London after this, they where held under 'private theatre club' conditions to get around the ban. The Lord Chamberlain finally licensed the play for public performance in December 1928, and it was staged the following month at the Westminster Theatre for a three-week run that was advertised as the play's 'first public performances'.

West End Premiere 1912 with Octavia Kenmore and Frederick Groves

London Revival 1927 with Hilda Maude and Douglas Burbidge

London Revival 1929 with Rosalinde Fuller and Douglas Burbidge

London Revival (in French) 1933 with Ludmilla Pitoeff and George Pitoeff

London Revival 1935 with Rosalinde Fuller and Robert Newton

1st West End London Revival 1939 with Ruth Lodge and George Woodbridge

London Revival 1949 with Joan Miller and Duncan Lamont

London Revival 1960 with Diane Cilento and Leon Peers

London Revival 1965 with Georgina Ward and Brian Phelan

2nd West End London Revival 1966 with Maggie Smith and Albery Finney

London Revival 1971 with Helen Mirren and Donal McCann

London Revival 1976 with Susan Hampshire and Martin Shaw

3rd West End London Revival with Cheryl Campbell and Stephen Rea

London Revival (in Swedish) 1987 with Marie Goranzon and Peter Stormare

London Revival 1990 with Lesley Manville and Barry Lynch

London Revival 1996 with Susan Lynch and John Hannah

4th West End London Revival 2000 with Aisling O'Sullivan and Christopher Eccleston


After Miss Julie. A version of August Stringberg's Miss Julie by Patrick Marber.

July 1945. A country house in England. Celebrations for the Labour Party's election victory are in full swing. Freed from the mantle of war, Britain is celebrating and change is in the air for the wealthy Miss Julie, her father's chauffeur, John, and Christine, the cook. On the cusp of personal and political transformation, all three have their reasons for wanting to break away from the constraints of the war years. Amidst the headiness of such new found freedom, all things seem possible and as the drink flows and the music plays, Miss Julie and John move ever closer, irresistibly drawn by their magnetic attraction that brings them together whilst at the game time threatening to tear them apart.

This was originally a BBC made-for-television drama, directed by Patrick Marber, that was screened by BBC 2 on Saturday 4 November 1995 with Geraldine Somerville as 'Miss Julie', Phil Daniels as 'John', and Kathy Burke as 'Christine'. The play's stage Premiere took place at the Donmar Warehouse in 2003.

After Miss Julie: London Premiere 2003 with Kelly Reilly and Richard Coyle

After Miss Julie: London Revival 2012 with Natalie Dormer and Kieran Bew


West End Premiere 1912 with Octavia Kenmore and Frederick Groves

28 April 1912 (one performance only) at the Little Theatre (now demolished)

Translated by Lucy Carr Shaw and Maurice Elvey from the German language version by Emil Schering.

Performed as a triple-bill with Leo Tolstoy's The Cause Of It All, and Clifford Bax's The Poctasters of Ispahan.

The cast featured Octavia Kenmore as 'Miss Julia', Frederick Groves as 'John', and Jean Bloomfield as 'Christine'.

Presented by the Adelphi Play Society under the title of Miss Julia.

The 371-seater Little Theatre at Adelphi was located in a converted banking hall on the north side of John Street, now John Adam Street. An office block named 'Adelphi' now covers the area that included the theatre.


London Revival 1927 with Hilda Maude and Douglas Burbidge

Opened 11 October 1927, Closed (unknown) at the Playroom Six Theatre Club (now demolished)

Translated by (unknown).

Performed in a double-bill with August Strindberg's Pariah.

The cast featured Hilda Maude as 'Miss Julie', Douglas Burbidge as 'John', and Olga Martin as 'Christine'.

Although unknown, it is thought that this production played for at least a few performances, either in a very short straight-run, or in repertory as part of the Playroom Six's season.

The Playroom Six Theatre was a 100-seat 'fringe' theatre located at 6 New Compton Street, and was the precusor to the Players Theatre in Villiers Street.


London Revival 1929 with Rosalinde Fuller and Douglas Burbidge

Opened 25 September 1929, Closed 29 September 1929 at the Arts Theatre Club (now called Arts Theatre)

Translated by (unknown).

Performed in a double-bill with August Strindberg's Pariah.

The cast featured Rosalinde Fuller as 'Miss Julie', Douglas Burbidge as 'John', and Olga Martin as 'Christine'.

Directed by Beatrice Wilson.


London Revival (in French) 1933 with Ludmilla Pitoeff and George Pitoeff

Opened 13 February 1933, Closed 16 February 1933 at the Arts Theatre Club (now called Arts Theatre)

Translated into French by Charles de Cazanove.

The cast featured Ludmilla Pitoeff as 'Miss Julie', George Pitoeff as 'Jean', and Nora Sylvere as 'Christine'.

Directed by George Pitoeff.

Presented in French under the title Mademoiselle Julie as part of a French Theatre season by George Pitoeff.


London Revival 1935 with Rosalinde Fuller and Robert Newton

27 January 1935 and 3 February 1935 (two performances) at the Arts Theatre Club (now called Arts Theatre)

Translated by Edward Bjorkman.

Performed as a double-bill with Helge Krog's The Copy.

The cast featured Rosalinde Fuller as 'Miss Julie', Robert Newton as 'Jean', and Margaret Webster as 'Christine'.

Directed by (unknown).


1st West End London Revival 1939 with Ruth Lodge and George Woodbridge

Opened 23 January 1939, Closed 11 February 1939 at the Westminster Theatre

Translated by C D Locock.

Performed in a triple-bill with Arthur Schnitzler's A Farewell Supper, and James Barries' The Will.

The cast featured Ruth Lodge as 'Miss Julie', George Woodbridge as 'John', and Rosanna Seaborn as 'Christine'.

Directed by Michael MacOwan.

Presented by the London Mask Theatre Company.

The Lord Chamberlain had licensed the play for 'public performances' in December 1938, and this production was advertised as being the play's 'first public performances'.


London Revival 1949 with Joan Miller and Duncan Lamont

Opened 2 August 1949, Closed 20 August 1949 at the Lyric Theatre, Hammersmith

Translated by C D Locock.

Performed in a double-bill with George Bernard Shaw's Village Wooing.

The cast featured Joan Miller as 'Miss Julie', Duncan Lamont as 'John', and Joan Matheson as 'Christine'.

Directed by Peter Coates.

Presented by the Peter Coates Company in association with the Company of Four.


London Revival 1960 with Diane Cilento and Leon Peers

Previewed 27 July 1960, Opened 28 July 1960, Closed 20 August 1960 at the Lyric Theatre, Hammersmith

Translated by Elizabeth Sprigg.

Performed in a double-bill with Anton Chekhov's The Proposal.

The cast featured Diane Cilento as 'Miss Julie', Leon Peers as 'Jean', and Pamela Pitchford as 'Kristin'.

Directed by Leila Blake.

The 'preview' performance on 27 July 1960 was a Charity Performance in aid of the 'Save The Children' fund.


London Revival 1965 with Georgina Ward and Brian Phelan

Opened 17 February 1965, Closed 13 March 1965 at the Arts Theatre Club (now Arts Theatre)

Translated by Elizabeth Spriggs.

Performed in a double-bill with Jules Feiffer's Crawling Arnold.

The cast featured Georgina Ward as 'Miss Julie', Brian Phelan as 'Jean', and Etain O'Dell as 'Kristin'.

Directed by Hana Pravda.


2nd West End London Revival 1966 with Maggie Smith and Albery Finney

Opened 8 March 1966, Closed 29 April 1966 (in repertory) at the Old Vic

Translated by Michael Mayer.

Performed in a double-bill with Peter Saffer's Black Comedy.

The cast featured Maggie Smith as 'Miss Julie', Albery Finney as 'Jean', and Jeanne Watts as 'Christine'.

Directed by Michael Elliott.

Presented by the National Theatre, in association with the Chichester Festival Theatre where this production had opened on 27 July 1965, and closed on 4 September 1965 (in repertory), with the same cast.


London Revival 1971 with Helen Mirren and Donal McCann

Previewed 25 October 1971, Opened 27 October 1971, Closed 9 Dcember 1971 (in repertory) at The Place

Translated by Michael Mayer.

The cast featured Helen Mirren as 'Miss Julie', Donal McCann as 'Jean', and Heather Canning as 'Kristin'.

Directed by Robin Phillips.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company at The Palce Theatre in Duke's Road, Euston, now a dance venue.


London Revival 1976 with Susan Hampshire and Martin Shaw

Previewed 28 April 1976, Opened 29 April 1976, Closed 22 May 1976 at the Greenwich Theatre

Translated by (unknown)

The cast featured Susan Hampshire as 'Miss Julie', Martin Shaw as 'Jean', and Marjorie Yates as 'Christine'.

Directed by John Cox.

This production was originally scheduled to be a new 'adaptation' by the Swedish actress and director Mai Zetterling - to be presented under the title Strindberg and Miss Julie, which included Strindberg as a character and interlaced background on Strindberg's life - but unfortunately this was abandoned shortly after rehearsals had started, partly on Zetterling's medical advice. John Cox took over as director and a 'standard' version of the play was presented.


3rd West End London Revival with Cheryl Campbell and Stephen Rea

Previewed 13 January 1983, 17 January 1983, Closed 19 February 1983 at the Lyric Studio, Hammersmith
Previewed 23 February 1983, Opened 2 March 1983, Closed 23 April 1983 at the Duke of York's Theatre

Translated by Michael Meyer.

The cast at the Lyric Studio, Hammersmith, featured Cheryl Campbell as 'Miss Julie', Stephen Rea as 'Jean', and Elaine Loudon as 'Christine', with Nina Edwards as 'Kitchen maid', and Alan Coveney as 'Groom'.

The cast at the West End's Duke of York's Theatre featured Cheryl Campbell as 'Miss Julie', Stephen Rea as 'Jean', and Veronica Roberts as 'Christine', with Nina Edwards as 'Kitchen maid', and Nicholas Jeune as 'Groom'.

Directed by Clare Davidson with designs by Dermot Hayes, lighting by Dave Horn, and sound by Matt McKenzie.


London Revival (in Swedish) 1987 with Marie Goranzon and Peter Stormare

17 and 18 June 1987 (two performances) at the National Theatre's Lyttelton Theatre

Performed in Swedish.

The cast featured Marie Goranzon as 'Miss Julie', Peter Stormare as 'Jean', and Gerthi Kulle as 'Kristine'.

Directed by Ingmar Bergman.

Presented at the National Theatre by the Royal Dramtic Theatre Company of Stockholm.


London Revival 1990 with Lesley Manville and Barry Lynch

Previewed 12 November 1990, Opened 13 November 1990, Close 8 December 1990 at the Greenwich Theatre

Translated by Helen Cooper.

The cast featured Lesley Manville as 'Miss Julie', Barry Lynch as 'Jean', and Janine Duvitski as 'Christine'.

Directed and designed by Tom Cairns with choreography by Aletta Collins, lighting by Steve Huttly, and music by Orlando Gough.


London Revival 1996 with Susan Lynch and John Hannah

Previewed 28 March 1996, Opened 29 March 1996, Closed 20 April 1996 at the Young Vic Theatre

Translated by Meredith Oakes.

The cast featured Susan Lynch as 'Miss Julie', John Hannah as 'Jean', and Cara Kelly as 'Kirstin'.

Directed by Polly Teale with designs by Robert Innes Hopkins, and music by Gary Yershon.


4th West End London Revival with Aisling O'Sullivan and Christopher Eccleston

Previewed 23 February, Opened 29 February 2000, Closed 13 May 2000 at the Haymarket Theatre Royal

Translated by Frank McGuinness.

The cast featured Aisling O'Sullivan as 'Miss Julie', Christopher Eccleston as 'Jean', and Maxine Peake as 'Kristin', with Gary Bates, Chloe Harbour, Andrew Lewis, Clare Mark, Jane Macfarlane, Jenny Oglivie, and Howard Teale.

Directed by Michael Boyd with choreography by Liz Ranken, designs by Tom Piper, lighting by Rick Fisher, and sound by Scott Myers.

"In a good staging, the play's overwrought Darwinian merger of the sex war and class conflict shatters rational resistance and sweeps you along on its powerful currents of attraction and repulsion. Here, it is possible to take an entirely detached view of the proceedings. But if you don't give the play a trapped atmosphere of claustrophobic subjectivity, the material invites damaging common-sense questions, such as: how does Miss Julie's suicide solve anything for Jean, if she is found dead with his razor in her hand? The problem is partly one of visual scale. Tom Piper's sunken kitchen is monumental, peered down into through high ground level windows by prurient peasants... the monumentality dwarfs and dissipates tension... There is no magnetism in the game of erotic brinkmanship as it is played here. Perhaps the mistake is casting two good-looking actors." The Independent

"The shock-waves duly roared and crackled in Michael Boyd's lurid production, even though the play's current of sexual electricity was virtually turned off... the precarious line which separates dramatics from strident melodrama kept being crossed. Christopher Eccleston and Aisling O'Sullivan were caught in a battle of bellows, firing high rant charges at each other... Once servant has ravished mistress, the sado-masochistic and power relations dramatically shift. Miss Julie, ought to succumb to panic, fear and confession of vulnerability, while Jean metaphorically takes the whip band. But Miss O'Sullivan, a startled look forever upon her face, perversely refuses to let her character be cowed and blazes in defiance. Eccleston, as if trying to assert Jean's supremacy, then raises his performance several pitches to high. He is thrilling in his vehemence, athletically leaping over tables in angry power-drive. But Michael Boyd's production of this poetic masterpiece slips into melodrama's purple in the process." The London Evening Standard

"The air crackled with anger for 80 tense minutes. There was a whole lot of shouting going on, rather more than was strictly necessary. For Aisling O'Sullivan plays Julie as mad as you like, obviously unhinged not just by the revels but also by her recently failed engagement to the county attorney. Non-stop, fit-as-a-fiddle Christopher Eccleston fumes so heartily you expect to see steam coming out of his ears. But the point about Jean is that he's a sly one, gradually manipulative... Michael Boyd's production is short on nuance, humour and beauty... The childhood confession, in which young Jean spied on Julie in a forbidden garden, is met not with tremulous excitement by Julie, but with a sort of troubled blankness. The best performance is that of Maxine Peake as the cook who switches from unselfconscious nymph to prim churchgoer overnight. Miss Julie? You might want to." The Daily Mail

Miss Julie in London at the Haymarket Theatre previewed from 23 February, opened on 29 February 2000, and closed 13 May 2000


After Miss Julie: London Premiere 2003 with Kelly Reilly and Richard Coyle

Previewed 20 November 2003, Opened 25 November 2003, Closed 7 February 2004 at the Donmar Warehouse

A version of Strindberg's Miss Julie by Patrick Marber.

The cast featured Kelly Reilly as 'Miss Julie', Richard Coyle as 'John', and Helen Baxendale as 'Christine'.

Directed by Michael Grandage with designs by Bunny Christie, lighting by Neil Austin, and sound by Matt McKenzie.


After Miss Julie: London Revival 2012 with Natalie Dormer and Kieran Bew

Previewed 15 March 2012, Opened 21 March 2012, Closed 14 April 2012 at the Young Vic Theatre

A version of Strindberg's Miss Julie by Patrick Marber.

The cast featured Natalie Dormer as 'Miss Julie', Kieran Bew as 'John', and Polly Frame as 'Christine'.

Directed by Natalie Abrahami with designs by Patrick Burnier, and lighting by Oliver Fenwick.