Jerusalem

Apollo Theatre
Shaftesbury Avenue, London

Public Previews: 16 April 2022
Opens: 28 April 2022
Closes: 7 August 2022

Buy tickets:

Nearest Tube: Piccadilly Circus

Location street map

Theatre seating plan

Show times
Monday no shows
Tuesday at 7.30pm
Wednesday at 1.30pm and 7.30pm
Thursday at 7.30pm
Friday at 7.30pm
Saturday at 1.30pm and 7.30pm
Sunday at 3.00pm
Sun 17 April no shows
Mon 18 April at 7.30pm
Wed 20 April at 7.30pm only
Sun 24 April no shows
Mon 25 April at 7.30pm
Wed 27 April at 7.30pm only
Sun 1 May no shows

Runs 3 hours

Seat prices
? to ?
(plus booking fees if applicable)

Jerusalem

Jez Butterworth's award-winning and critically acclaimed play Jerusalem in London starring Mark Rylance and Mackenzie Crook

On St George's Day, the morning of the local county fair, Johnny Byron, local waster and modern day Pied Piper, is a wanted man. The council officials want to serve him an eviction notice, his son wants his dad to take him to the fair, Troy Whitworth wants to give him a serious kicking and a motley crew of mates want his ample supply of drugs and alcohol.

Jez Butterworth's Jerusalem returns to London starring Mark Rylance and Mackenzie Crook, who are both reprising the roles they played in the original sell-out production seen at the Royal Court Theatre in 2009, and the Apollo Theatre in 2010 and 2011.

The cast features Mark Rylance as 'Johnny 'Rooster' Byron', and Mackenzie Crook as 'Ginger'.

Directed by Ian Rickson, with designs by Ultz, lighting by Mimi Jordan Sherin, music by Stephen Warbeck, and sound by Ian Dickinson.

Mark Rylance's London theatre credits including playing the roles of 'Iago' in Claire van Kampen's revival of William Shakespeare's Othello at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre in 2018; 'Ron' in Claire van Kampen's production of the Louis Jenkins and Mark Rylance comedy Nice Fish at the Harold Pinter Theatre in 2016; 'King Philippe V' in John Dove's production of Claire van Kampen's Farinelli and the King at the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse at the Shakespeare's Globe, and transfer to the West End's Duke of York's Theatre in 2015; the title role in Tim Carroll's revival of William Shakespeare's Richard III at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre, and transfer to the West End's Apollo Theatre in 2012; 'Valere' in Matthew Warchus' revival of David Hirson's La Bete at the Harold Pinter Theatre in 2010; 'Hamm' in Simon McBurney's revival of Samuel Beckett's Endgame at the Duchess Theatre 2009; 'Robert' in Matthew Warchus' revival of Marc Camoletti's Boeing Boeing at the Harold Pinter Theatre in 2007; 'Duke Vincentio' in Jonathan Dove's revival of William Shakespeare's Measure for Measure at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre in 2004 and 2005; 'Olivia' in Tim Carroll's revival of William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre in 2002 and 2003; 'Henry' in Matthew Warchus's production of Yasmina Reza's Life x3 at the National Theatre in 2000, and transfer to the West End's Old Vic Theatre in 2001; 'Cleopatra' in Giles Block's revival of William Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre in 1999; alternating as 'Austin'/'Lee' in Matthew Warchus' revival of Sam Shepard's True West at the Donmar Warehouse in 1994; 'Prospero' in his revival of William Shakespeare's The Tempest at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre in 1991; 'Romeo' in Terry Hands' revival of William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, for the Royal Shakespeare Company, at the Barbican Pit Theatre in 1990; 'Lucentio' in Barry Kyle's William Shakespeare's play The Taming of the Shrew, for the Royal Shakespeare Company, at the Barbican Theatre in 1983; 'Damis' in Bill Alexander's revival of Moliere's Tartuffe at the Barbican Pit Theatre in 1983; the title role in John Caird and Trevor Nunn's production of JM Barrie's Peter Pan at the Barbican Theatre in 1983; and 'Madame' in Clare Davidson's revival of Jean Genet's The Maids at the Hammersmith Lyric Theatre Studio in 1981.

Mackenzie Crook's London theatre credits include the roles of 'Konstantin' in Ian Rickson's revival of Anton Chekhov's The Seagull at the Royal Court Theatre in 2007; and 'Bily Bibbitt' in Terry Johnson and Tamara Harvey's revival of Dale Wasserman's One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest at the Gielgud Theatre in 2004.

Jerusalem in London at the Apollo Theatre public previews from 16 April 2022, opens on 28 April 2022, and closes on 7 August 2022


2009 to 2012: Original West End London Production

Previewed 10 July 2009, Opened 15 July 2009, Closed 22 August 2009 at the Royal Court Theatre
Previewed 28 January 2010, Opened 10 February 2010, Closed 24 April 2010 at the Apollo Theatre
Previewed 8 October 2011, Opened 17 October 2011, Closed 14 January 2012 at the Apollo Theatre

Jez Butterworth's critically acclaimed and award-winning play Jerusalem in London returns to the Apollo Theatre for a strictly limited 13-week season

The cast at London's Royal Court Theatre in 2009 and the West End's Apollo Theatre in 2010 featured Mark Rylance as 'Johnny 'Rooster' Byron' and Mackenzie Crook as 'Ginger', with Jessica Barden as 'Pea', Tom Brooke as 'Lee', Alan David as 'The Professor', Aimee-Ffion Edwards as 'Phaedra', Gerard Horan as 'Wesley', Danny Kirrane as 'Davey', Charlotte Mills as 'Tanya', Lucy Montgomery as 'Dawn' (at the Royal Court Theatre), Amy Beth Hayes as 'Dawn' (at the Apollo Theatre), Sarah Moyle as 'Ms Fawcett', Harvey Robinson as 'Mr Parsons', and Barry Sloane as 'Troy Whitworth'. At the Royal Court Theatre the role of 'Marky' was shared by Lewis Coppen and Lenny Harvey. At the Apollo Theatre the role of 'Marky' was shared by Charlie Dunbar-Aldred, Lennie Harvey and Jake Noble.

The cast at West End's Apollo Theatre in 2011 featured Mark Rylance as 'Johnny 'Rooster' Byron' and Mackenzie Crook as 'Ginger', with Sophie McShera as 'Pea', Johnny Flynn as 'Lee', Alan David as 'The Professor', Aimee-Ffion Edwards as 'Phaedra', Max Baker as 'Wesley', Danny Kirrane as 'Davey', Charlotte Mills as 'Tanya', Geraldine Hughes as 'Dawn', Sarah Moyle as 'Ms Fawcett', Harvey Robinson as 'Mr Parsons', and Barry Sloane as 'Troy Whitworth'. The role of 'Marky' was shared by Lenny Harvey, Dylan Standen and Archie Waite.

Directed by Ian Rickson with designs by Ultz, lighting by Mimi Jordan Sherin, music by Stephen Warbeck, and sound by Ian Dickinson.

This production was staged in New York at Broadway's Music Box Theatre where it previewed from 2 April 2011, opened on 21 April 2011 and closed on 21 August 2011.

"Very occasionally, a performance is so charismatic, so complete and compelling, that it doesn't look like acting. Instead, it is a total embodiment of a character. Mark Rylance achieves this in Jez Butterworth's wildly original, exceptionally funny new play Jerusalem. It has now transferred to the West End from the Royal Court and is even better. Rylance plays the antic spirit Johnny 'Rooster' Byron, holding court beneath the beech trees in a Wiltshire wood... He's a magnet for the local young, to whom he supplies drugs, drink and chocices, which fits the bit of this contradictory creature, who likes nothing more than to settle down with a spliff to watch Antiques Roadshow. Butterworth's point, as the title signposts, is that England's green and pleasant land is under threat and not always pleasant. Certainly, the Byrons of this world are a mixed blessing and he's not the sort of chap you'd want living next door... Rooster is part Pied Piper, part Johnny Rotten, certainly unwashed, possibly unhinged, a wastrel, a scoundrel, an irresistible comic shaman... It's a comic tour de force that becomes something much deeper and darker. Rooster is ultimately defeated, but Rylance's performance remains a triumph. The must see performance of a lifetime." The Mail on Sunday

"At the heart of Jez Butterworth's new play, Jerusalem, stands a character and a performance by Mark Rylance, which should deeply divide audience opinion... Johnny 'Rooster' Byron is the stuff of parents' nightmares. A washed-up, alcoholic drug-dealer, living in a fetid caravan on the edge of a wood in a West Country village, Byron is a modern-day Pied Piper, with the impressionable teenagers of the district dancing to his anti-establishment tune... Without an actor blessed with Rylance's timing and physical skills, the play could fall flat on its face... The supporting cast has no weak link... Some may see Jerusalem as a patronising take on rural life; some will enjoy its vinegary truth; some may seek deeper symbolic resonances. But that's more than a starting point for argument." The Sunday Telegraph

Jerusalem in London at the Apollo Theatre previewed from 8 October 2011, opened on 17 October 2011, and closed on 14 January 2012.