Cinderella

Gillian Lynne Theatre (previously called New London Theatre)
Drury Lane, London

Previewed: 25 June 2021
Opened: 18 August 2021
Booking to: 29 May 2022

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Nearest Tube: Covent Garden

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Show times
Up to 24 October 2021
Monday no shows
Tuesday no shows
Wednesday at 2.30pm and 7.30pm
Thursday at 7.30pm
Friday at 7.30pm
Saturday at 2.30pm and 7.30pm
Sunday at 3.00pm

Show times
From 25 October 2021
Monday at 7.30pm
Tuesday no shows
Wednesday at 2.30pm and 7.30pm
Thursday at 7.30pm
Friday at 7.30pm
Saturday at 2.30pm and 7.30pm
Sunday at 3.00pm

Runs ? hours and ? minutes

Seat prices
? to ? (plus booking fees if applicable)

Cinderella

The eagerly awaited new Andrew Lloyd Webber musical Cinderella in London

Everybody knows the story, but do you??... Get ready for Cinderella... like you've never seen her before. The show's composer Andrew Lloyd Webber explains: "I think the thing about this Cinderella is that it is unlike any other Cinderella - it simply by definition is completely different. It's set in the most beautiful village that you'll ever find in the entire world with the most beautiful people you'll ever find in the entire world, and it all looks absolutely gorgeous. Then everything starts to go a little wrong, and we meet Cinderella who is a misfit and she doesn't belong to this world. I think what really attracted me to the story was the idea that Cinderella changes herself in order to try and please somebody else and that somebody else doesn't recognize the person that Cinderella has become. The central thing for me is that it's about beauty, but it's about beauty being what you are, rather than what you try and make yourself."

Musical with music by Andrew Lloyd Webber, lyrics by David Zippel, and original book by Emerald Fennell.

The original cast featured Carrie Hope Fletcher as 'Cinderella' (not 15 to 20 December, 2 to 7 February, 23 to 25 March, and 20 to 25 April), Georgina Onuorah as 'Alternate Cinderella', Ivano Turco as 'Prince Sebastian', Victoria Hamilton-Barritt as 'The Stepmother', Rebecca Trehearn as 'The Queen', Caleb Roberts as 'Prince Charming', Georgina Castle as 'Marie', Giovanni Spano as 'Gawain', Gloria Onitiri as 'The Godmother', Laura Baldwin as 'Adele', Sam Robinson as 'Dorian', Vinny Coyle as 'Arthur', Alexandra Waite Roberts, Georgia Tapp, James Lee Harris, Jessica Kirton, Jonathan David Dudley, Kate Ivory Jordan, Kelsie-Rae Marshall, Lauren Byrne, Matthieu Vinetot, Michael Afemare, Michael Hamway, Michelle Bishop, Nicole Deon, Rodney Vubya, Sophie Camble, Tobias Charles, Andy Rees, Dominic Adam Griffin, Joshua Robinson, Lauren Stroud, Leah Harris, Lydia Bannister, Natasha May-Thomas, and William Bozier. All castng subject to change without notice.

Directed by Laurence Connor, with choreography by JoAnn Hunter, designs by Gabriela Tylesova, lighting by Bruno Poet, and sound by Gareth Owen.

Carrie Hope Fletcher's London theatre credits include playing the roles of 'Veronica' Heathers at the Other Palace, and transfer to the West End's Haymarket Theatre in 2018; 'Fantine' in the Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schonberg musical Les Miserables at the Queen's Theatre in 2013/2019, and the Les Miserables Concert at the Gielgud Theatre in 2019; 'Jane Banks' in Mary Poppins at the Prince Edward Theatre in 2004; 'Jemima Potts' in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang at the London Palladium in 2002; and 'Young Eponine' in Les Miserables at the Palace Theatre in 2001.

Victoria Hamilton-Barritt's London theatre credits include playing the roles of 'The Woman'/'Jennie' in Marianne Elliott's revival of Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman at the Young Vic Theatre, and transfer to the West End's Piccadilly Theatre in 2019; 'The Narrator' in Sam Yates' production of the Julia Jordan and Juliana Nash musical Murder Ballad at the Arts Theatre in 2016; 'Diana Morales' in Bob Avian's revival of the Marvin Hamlisch and Edward Kleban musical A Chorus Line at the London Palladium in 2013; 'Alex' in Nikolai Foster's production of the Robbie Roth, Robert Cary and Robbie Roth musical Flashdance at the Shaftesbury Theatre in 2010; and 'Maria' in Angus Jackson's production of Peter Michael Marino's Blondie musical Desperately Seeking Susan at the Novello Theatre in 2007.

Rebecca Trehearn's London theatre credits include playing the roles of 'Donna'/'Oolie' in Josie Rourke's revival of the Cy Coleman and David Zippel musical City Of Angels at the Donmar Warehouse in 2014, and transfer to the West End's Garrick Theatre in 2020; 'Belle' in Matthew Warchus' production of Jack Thorne's stage adapation of Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol at the Old Vic Theatre in 2019; 'Julie La Verne' in Daniel Evans' revival of the Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II musical Showboat at the New London Theatre in 2016; the ensemble in Rachel Kavanaugh's production of the Howard Goodall and Stephen Clark musical Love Story at the Duchess Theatre in 2010; and the ensemble in Trevor Nunn's revival of the Andrew Lloyd Webber, Don Black and Charles Hart musical Aspects Of Love at the Menier Chocolate Factory in 2010.

NOTE: This production was delayed due to the COVID situation. When originally announced it was scheduled to have public previews from 28 August 2020, with an opening on 23 September 2020. This was then initially delayed by one month, with previews from 9 October 2020, and an opening on 28 October 2020, before it was delayed again, this time by six months, with previews from 30 April 2021, and an opening on 19 May 2021, before finally being delayed by a further two months with public previews starting on Friday 25 June 2021, with a planned for opening on first of all on Monday 14 July, and then Tuesday 20 July. Unfortunately, due to a single case of COVID-19 found within the cast on the morning of Saturday 17 July requiring self-isolation by all close-contacts, performances from Saturday 17 July where cancelled. Performances resumed on Wednesday 18 August 2021, which was deemed as the opening night to which the national newspaper critics where invited, with a further opening night, for invited guests, being held a week later on Wednesday 25 August 2021.

During the preview period this production played a reduced variable performance schedule. From Wednesday 18 August 2021 through to Sunday 24 October it played seven-performances-a-week: Wednesday to Saturday evenings, and afternoon matinees on Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. From Monday 25 October 2021 it plays eight-performance-a-week: Monday, Wednesday to Saturday evenings, and afternoon matinees on Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday.

Cinderella in London at the Gillian Lynne Theatre previewed from 25 June 2021, and opened on 18 August 2021 (no performances from 17 July to 17 August 2021)


Previous Stage Productions of Cinderella in London:

1958 Tommy Steele / 1960 Ted Rodgers (Rodgers and Hammerstein)

1966 Cliff Richard (The Shadows, Albert J Knight and David Croft)

1971 Ronnie Corbett (Albert J Knight et al)

1974 Twiggy (Frank Hauser)

1976 Richard O'Sullivan (Albert J Knight and Brian Blackburn)

1983 Robert Stephens (Bill Bryden and Trevor Ray)

1988 Jim Davidson (Jim Davidson family version)

1994/1997 Sin-derella Jim Davidson (Jim Davidson adult version)

1997/2010/2017 Matthew Bourne's Adventures in Motion Pictures

2007 Sandi Toksvig (Stephen Fry)

2012/2013 (Sally Cookson / Tobacco Factory Theatre)

2016 Paul O'Grady (Michael Harrison)


1958 Tommy Steele / 1960 Ted Rodgers (Rodgers and Hammerstein)

Opened 18 December 1958 (no previews), Closed 11 April 1959 at the London Coliseum
Returned 23 December 1960 (no previews), Closed 4 March 1961 at the Adelphi Theatre

Musical with music by Richard Rodgers, and lyrics and book by Oscar Hammerstein II, with additional pantomime material by Ronnie Wolfe.

The cast for the 1958 season featured Yana as 'Cinderella', Tommy Steele as 'Buttons', Jimmy Edwards as 'The King', Enid Lowe as 'The Queen', Bruce Trent as 'The Prince', Godfrey James as 'Dandini', Graham Squire as 'The Baron', Kenneth Williams as 'Portia, the stepdaughter', Ted Durante as 'Joy, the stepdaughter', Betty Marsden as 'The Fairy Godmother', Maryon Leslie as 'Baby Bear', Robin Palmer as 'Lord Chancellor', and Prudence Rodney as 'The Crystal Fairy'.

The cast for the 1960 season featured Janet Waters as 'Cinderella', Ted Rodgers as 'Buttons', Jimmy Edwards as 'The King', Betty Bowdon as 'The Queen', Bill Newman as 'The Prince', Frank Raymond as 'Flunkey' (AKA 'Dandini'), Graham Squire as The Baron', Richard Wakeley as 'Portia, the stepdaughter', Ted Durante as 'Joy, the stepdaughter', Joan Heal as 'The Fairy Godmother', Maryon Leslie as 'Baby Bear', Arthur Howard as 'Lord Chancellor', and Gillian Lynne as 'The Crystal Fairy'.

Directed by Freddie Carpenter, with choreography by Tommy Linden (London Coliseum), choreography by Sidonie Darrell (Adelphi Theatre), designs by Loudon Sainthill, and lighting by Michael Northen.

This was the stage premiere of the Rodgers and Hammerstein 1957 television musical, though it should be noted that this production was adapted for a British audience more used to a 'traditional' pantomime storyline, and therefore included the addition of the 'Buttons' character, which was not in the television version.

This production marked the 'legitimate' theatre stage debut of the pop-singer Tommy Steele, as well as the West End producing debut for the impresario Harold Fielding.


1966 Cliff Richard (The Shadows, Albert J Knight and David Croft)

Opened 20 December 1966 (no previews), Closed 1 April 1967 at the London Palladium

Family pantomime devised by Albert J Knight, with music and lyrics by The Shadows, and book by David Croft.

The cast featured Pippa Steel as 'Cinderella', Cliff Richard as 'Buttons', Peter Gilmore as 'The Prince', Tudor Davies as 'Dandini', Jack Douglas as 'Baron Hardup', Terry Scott as 'Teresa, the stepdaughter', Hugh Lloyd as 'Eunice', the stepdaughter', Patricia Herrin as 'The Guardian Fairy', The Shadows as 'The Broker's Men', Avril Yarrow as 'Mistress Maybelle', Bill Tasker as 'The Town Crier'/'The Vicar of Stoneybroke', and Jack Francois as 'Major Domo'/'The Inn Keeper'.

Directed by Albert J Knight, with choreography by Pamela Devis, sets by Tod Kingman, and costumes by Cynthia Tingay.

The Shadows, an instrumental pop group who often played with Cliff Richard, comprised of Brian Bennett, Hank Marvin, John Rostill, and Bruce Welch.


1971 Ronnie Corbett (Albert J Knight et al)

Opened 21 December 1971 (no previews), Closed 8 April 1972 at the London Palladium

Family pantomime devised by Albert J Knight, with additional scenes by Brian Blackburn, Barry Cryer, Dave Freeman, and Spike Mullins, and book by Phil Park.

The cast featured Clodagh Rogers as 'Cinderella', Ronnie Corbett as 'Buttons', Malcolm Roberts as 'The Prince', Brian Hills as 'Dandini', David Kossoff as 'Baron Hardup', Terry Scott as 'Teresa, the stepsister', Julian Orchard as 'Julia, the stepsister', Dorothy Dampier as 'The Fairy Godmother', The Patton Brothers as 'The Broker's Men', Georgia Jee as 'Mistress Maybelle', Bill Tasker as 'The Town Cryer'/'Old Man', and Bertie Hare as 'Major Domo'.

Directed by Albert J Knight, with choreography by Tommy Shaw, sets by Tod Kingman, and costumes by Cynthia Tingay.

The Patton Brothers where Jimmy Elliott and Brian Elliott (who where the older brothers of Barry Elliott and Paul Elliott, AKA The Chuckle Brothers).


1974 Twiggy (Frank Hauser)

Previewed 16 December 1974, Opened 18 December 1974, Closed 1 February 1975 at the London Casino (now Prince Edward Theatre)

Family pantomime by Frank Hauser.

The cast featured Twiggy as 'Cinderella', Nicky Henson as 'Buttons', Betty Benfield as 'The Queen', Marc Urquhart as 'Prince Charming', Bob Hornery as 'Dandini', John Rutland as 'The Baron', Roy Kinnear as 'Vareria, the stepdaugher', Hugh Paddick as 'Cornucopia, the stepdaughter', Harry H. Corbett and Wilfrid Brambell as 'Ben and Badger, the Broker's Men', Joyce Grant as 'The Fairy Godmother', John J Moore as 'Gumble', and the ventriloquist Terry Hall with 'Lenny the Lion'.

Directed by Frank Hauser and Dick Hurran, with choreography by Irving Davies, sets by Tod Kingman, and costumes by Robert St. John Roper and Cynthia Tingey.

This production marked the stage debut of the model Twiggy.

Although this production was scheduled to play up to 22 March 1975, but it closed seven-weeks early on 1 February 1975.


1976 Richard O'Sullivan (Albert J Knight and Brian Blackburn)

Opened 21 December 1976 (no previews), Closed 26 March 1977 at the London Palladium

Family pantomime devised by Albert J Knight, with book by Brian Blackburn.

The cast featured Fiona Fullerton as 'Cinderella', Richard O'Sullivan as 'Buttons', Robert Young as 'The Prince', the ventriloquist Roger de Courcey as 'Dandini' with Nookie the Bear, Richard Hearne (AKA Mr Pastry) as 'Baron Hardup', Yootha Joyce as 'Mildred, the stepdaughter', Brian Murphy as 'Georgina, the stepdaughter', Gordon Jay and Bunny Jay as 'The Broker's Men', Mary Laine as 'The Fairy Godmother', Bill Boazman as 'The Town Crier'/'Major Domo', and Erica Yorke as 'Mistress Maybelle'.

Directed by Albert J Knight, with choreography by Pamela Devis, sets by Tod Kingman, and costumes by Cynthia Tingay.


1983 Robert Stephens (Bill Bryden and Trevor Ray)

Previewed 10 December 1983, Opened 15 December 1983, Closed 18 February 1984 (in repertory) at the National Theatre's Lyttelton Theatre

A family pantomime adapted by Bill Bryden, Trevor Ray, and the Company.

The cast featured Janet Dibley as 'Cinderella', Tony Haygarth as 'Buttons', Susan Fleetwood as 'Prince Charming', Marsha Hunt as 'Dandini', Trevor Ray as 'Baron Hardup', Derek Newark as 'Gloria, the stephdaughter', Robert Stephens as 'Euphoria, the stepdaughter', Jack Shepherd and John Tams as 'The Broker's Men', Edna Dore as 'The Fairy Godmother', Stephen Petcher and Anthony Trent as 'Radish, the horse', James Grant as 'Demon Dour', and Robert Oates as 'Major Domo'.

Directed by Bill Bryden, with choreography by David Toguri, sets by William Dudley, costumes by Deirdre Clancy, lighting by William Bundy, music by Matthew Scott, and sound by Chris Montgomery.

This production, which was scheduled to play in repertory up to 10 March 1984, but closed early on 18 February 1984, with performances replaced by Johannesburg's Market Theatre Company's production of Athol Fugard's Master Harold... and the Boys which transferred from the NT's Cottesloe Theatre.


1988 Jim Davidson (Jim Davidson family version)

Previewed 17 December 1988, Opened 23 December 1988, Closed 21 January 1989 at the Dominion Theatre

Family pantomime written by Jim Davidson.

The cast featured Diane Lee as 'Cinderella', Jim Davidson as 'Buttons', Jess Conrad as 'Prince Charming', Carl Wayne as 'Dandini', George Sewell as 'Baron Hardup', Roger Kitter as 'Alexis, the stepdaughter', Freddie Lees as 'Krystle, the stepdaughter', and Sherrie Hewson as 'Fairy Godmother'.

Directed by Jim Davidson, with choreographed by Brian Rogers.

This was a traditional family show. Six years later Jim Davidson brought his adult pantomime Sin-derella to the West End, see below.


1994/1997 Sin-derella Jim Davidson (Jim Davidson adult version)

Previewed 7 March 1994, Opened 9 March 1994, Closed 2 July 1994 at the Cambridge Theatre
Returned 7 November 1994, Closed 3 December 1994 at the Cambridge Theatre
Opened 22 April 1997, Closed 3 May 1997 at the Shaftesbury Theatre

Adult pantomime (advertised as being 'for children over 18 only') by Jim Davidson and Bryan Blackburn.

The cast featured Dianne Lee as 'Cinderella', Jim Davidson as 'Buttons', Jess Conrad as 'Prince Charming', David Kristian as 'Dandini', Charlie Drake as 'Baron Von Hard-on' (1994 seasons only), Roger Kitter as 'Camilla, the stepdaughter', Dave Lee as 'Madonna, the stepdaughter', Mia Carla as 'The Fairy Godmother', and Deborah Corrigan as 'Fairy Mark II' (1997 season only).

Directed by Jim Davidson, with choreography by Brian Rogers, costumes by Bryan Lawson, and lighting by Mike Adams.

The 1994 version was titled Sinderella, and the 1997 version, which was revised and reworked, was called Sinderella Comes Again and featured an extra character called 'Fairy Mark II' in the cast.


1997/2010/2017 Matthew Bourne's Adventures in Motion Pictures

Previewed 22 September 1997, Opened 7 October 1997, Closed 10 January 1998 at the Piccadilly Theatre
Previewed 30 November 2010, Opened 8 December 2010, Closed 23 January 2011 at Sadler's Wells
Previewed 9 December 2017, Opened 19 December 2017, Closed 27 January 2018 at Sadler's Wells

Ballet by Matthew Bourne, with music by Serge Prokofieff.

Matthew Bourne's New Adventures present a major revival of the dance show Cinderella in London for a strictly limited seven week season

Matthew Bourne's acclaimed dance production sets the classic love story in London during the Second World War. A chance meeting results in a magical night for Cinderella and her dashing young RAF pilot, together just long enough to fall in love before being parted by the horrors of the Blitz. Featuring Prokofiev's magnificent score along with the sights and sounds of war-torn London.

This production was presented in a revised version for the 2010 and 2017 seasons, using a specially commissioned pre-recorded 'surround-sound' track, played by a 60 piece orchestra.

PLEASE NOTE that children under 5 will not be admitted.

The cast at the West End's Piccadilly Theatre in 1997 featured either Maxine Fone, Sarah Wildor, Saranne Curtin as 'Cinderella'; Adam Cooper, Ewan Wardrop, Will Kemp as 'Harry, the Pilot'; Theo Clinkard, Will Kemp as 'Angel, the Godfather'; Barry Atkinson as 'Robert, the Father'; Isabel Mortimer, Lynn Seymour as 'Sybil, the Stepmother'; Heather Habens, Michela Meazza as 'Vivien, the Stepsister'; Emily Piercy, Vicky Evans as 'Irene, the Stepsister'; Colin Ross-Waterson, Scott Ambler as 'Malcolm, the Stepbrother'; Ben Wright, Theo Clinkard as 'Vernon, the Stepbrother'; Andrew Walkinshaw as 'Elliot, the Stepbrother'; Etta Murfitt, Teresa Barker as 'Maggie, the Girlfriend'; Jacqueline Anderson, Valentina Formenti as 'Betty, the Girlfriend'; Phil Hill as 'Stan, the Boyfriend'; and Neil Penlington as 'Buster, the Boyfriend'; with Andrew Corbett, Arthur Pita, Ben Hartley, Darren Ellis, Floyd Hendricks, Kirsty Tapp, Lucy Harrison, and the New London Orchestra.

The cast at London's Sadler's Wells in 2010 featured either Ashley Shaw, Kerry Biggin, Noi Tolmer as 'Cinderella'; Edwin Ray, Neil Westmoreland, Sam Archer as 'Harry, the Pilot'; Adam Maskell, Christopher Marney, Glenn Graham as 'Angel, the Godfather'; Neil Westmoreland, Paul Smethurst as 'Robert, the Father'; Etta Murfitt, Michela Meazza as 'Sybil, the Stepmother'; Chloe Wilkinson, Zizi Strallen as 'Vivien, the Stepsister'; Chloe Wilkinson, Sophia Hurdley as 'Irene, the Stepsister'; Joe Walkling, Shaun Walters as 'Malcolm, the Stepbrother'; Dan Wright, Paul Smethurst as 'Vernon, the Stepbrother'; Daniel Collins, Gavin Persand as 'Elliot, the Stepbrother'; Kate Lyons, Noi Tolmer as 'Maggie, the Girlfriend'; Dena Lague, Zizi Strallen as 'Betty, the Girlfriend'; Daniel Collins, Ross Carpenter as 'Stan, the Boyfriend'; and Adam Maskell, Dominic Lamb as 'Buster, the Boyfriend'; with Dominic North, Mikah Smillie, and Tom Jackson Greaves.

The cast at London's Sadler's Wells in 2017 featured either Ashley Shaw, Cordelia Braithwaite as 'Cinderella'; Andrew Monaghan, Dominic North, Will Bozier as 'Harry, the Pilot'; Liam Mower, Paris Fitzpatrick as 'Angel, the Godfather'; Alan Vincent, Dan Wright as 'Robert, the Father'; Anjali Mehra, Madelaine Brennan, Michela Meazza as 'Sybil, the Stepmother'; Anjali Mehra, Nicole Kabera as 'Vivien, the Stepsister'; Sophia Hurdley, Steph Billers as 'Irene, the Stepsister'; Andrew Monaghan, Jackson Fisch as 'Malcolm, the Stepbrother'; Dan Wright, Jack Jones as 'Vernon, the Stepbrother'; Paris Fitzpatrick, Stephen Murray as 'Elliot, the Stepbrother'; Katie Webb, Seren Williams as 'Maggie, the Girlfriend'; Cordelia Braithwaite, Sophia Hurdley as 'Betty, the Girlfriend'; Danny Reubens, Reece Causton as 'Stan, the Boyfriend'; and Joao Carolino, Reece Causton as 'Buster, the Boyfriend'; with Glenn Graham, Kate Lyons, Jamie McDonald, and Seren Williams.

Directed and choreographed by Matthew Bourne, with designs by Lez Brotherston, lighting by Rick Fisher, sound by Simon King (1997), and sound by Paul Groothuis (2010 and 2017).

"At Sadler's Wells, Matthew Bourne has reworked a production he first mounted in 1997. Picking up on the fact that Prokofiev wrote the music for Cinderella during the Second World War, Bourne makes London during the Blitz the setting... Bourne has a great talent for creating amusing characters, but he's not so hot when it comes to telling a story. There isn't a pointe shoe in sight - it's more like a silent film than a ballet. The show's real hero is the designer Lez Brotherston." The Mail on Sunday

"Choreographer Matthew Bourne confronts genre in his revised Cinderella by transferring features of film nolr to an impressive, self-styled dance theatre noir. The production, designed by Lez Brotherston, is set in a city at night with shadows leaping off walls in streets from which there is no escape. Colours are black and grey, apart from guests at a New Year's Eve party in midnight blue tulle. This may be wartime London but the atmosphere is Kiss Me Deadly... Bourne has made a wartime story accessible to a post-war generation. He deepens the narrative with a contagion of psychological motive and deconstructs the difficult Prokofiev score by fastidiously customising steps for characters in solos, duets and groups. These are the things he does best. Cinderella has complexity, subtlety and surprises and is a worthy sequel to Swan Lake." The London Evening Standard

"In Cinderella for Adventures in Motion Pictures, as in his groundbreaking Swan Lake, Matthew Bourne has invented a new take on an old story, while retaining the originl ballet music - in this case, by Prokofiev, who started his score in 1942, as the Germans invaded Russia, and finished it in 1945... Bourne has invented a new kind of musical, using the conventions of ballet and film instead of showbiz. His double-threat performers - dancers who can act - could probably sing as well: they don't need to... Cinderella is not as divine as Swan Lake and not (yet) as fully realised. But it's the kind of night out you could enjoy again and again, picking up sub-plots and savouring alternative casts." The Observer

Matthew Bourne's Cinderella in London at Sadler's Wells previewed from 9 December 2017, opened on 19 December 2017, and closed on 27 January 2018


2007 Sandi Toksvig (Stephen Fry)

Previewed 4 December 2007, Opened 13 December 2007, Closed 20 January 2008 at the Old Vic Theatre

Stephen Fry's pantomime Cinderella in London starring Pauline Collins and Sandi Toksvig

A tale of passion, jealousy, cross-dressing, injustice, chocolate, madness, cruelty, ice cream, hatred, revenge, jelly, unrequited love, envy, tarts, forgiveness, music, laughter, hope, redemption and most important of all, love - the truest, purest true love that ever was. And cake. So much cake you won't believe.

Note: This production was originally due to open on Sunday 9 December 2007, but unfortunately Sandi Toksvig came down with bronchitis during the previews so the 'First Night' was postponed until Thursday 13 December 2007.

The cast featured Sandi Toksvig as 'The Narrator', Madeleine Worrall as 'Cinderella', Paul Keating as 'Buttons', Matthew White as 'The King', Penny Layden as 'The Queen', Joseph Millson as 'Prince Charming', Oliver Chopping as 'Dandini', Mark Lockyer as 'Dolce, the stepdaughter', Hal Fowler as 'Gabbana, the stepdaughter', Pauline Collins as 'The Fairy Godmother', Debbie Chazen as 'Candida', Daniel Robinson as 'Herald', and Sherrie Pennington as 'Lady Susan', with Bonnie Parker, Claire Winsper, Daniella Gibb, Gareth Charleton, Jo Servi, Lousia Maxwell, Simon Harvey, and Simon Shorten.

Directed by Fiona Laird, with choreography by Francesca Jaynes, designs by Stephen Brimson Lewis, lighting by Tim Mitchell, music by Anne Dudley, and sound by Nick Lidster and Terry Jardine.

Paul Keating's London theatre credits include playing the roles of 'Seymour' in Matthew White's revival of the Alan Menken and Howard Ashman musical Little Shop of Horrors at the Duke of York's Theatre and the Ambassadors Theatre in 2007; 'Straight Dave' in Gemma Bodinetz's production of the Neil Tennant and Chris Lowe musical Closer to Heaven at the Arts Theatre in 2001; 'Agon' in Steven Dexter's production of the Laurence O'Keefe and John Claflin musical La Cava at the Victoria Palace Theatre and transfer to the Piccadilly Theatre in 2000; and the title role of 'Tommy' in Des McAnuff's revival of the Pete Townshend and The Who musical Tommy at the Shaftesbury Theatre in 1996.

Joseph Millson's West End credits include the role of 'Prince Charming' in Fiona Laird's production of Stephen Fry's pantomime Cinderella at the Old Vic Theatre in 2007; and the ensemble of Nancy Meckler and Polly Teale's revival of Helen Edmundson's stage adaptation of George Eliot's The Mill on the Floss at the Ambassadors Theatre in 2001.

Hal Fowler's London theatre credits include playing the roles of 'Captain Corcoran' in Ian Talbot's revival of the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta H M S Pinafore at the Regent's Park Open Air Theatre in 2005; 'Anatole Aubin' in Fiona Laird's production of Peter Tilbury's Under the Doctor at the Comedy Theatre in 2001; 'Mike Connor' in Ian Talbot's revival of Noel Coward's High Society at the Regent's Park Open Air Theatre in 2003; the title role of 'Arnaud du Thil (Martin)' in Declan Donnellan's production of the Claude-Michel Schonberg and Alain Boublil musical Martin Guerre at the Prince Edward Theatre in 1997; 'Cousin Kevin' in Des McAnuff's revival of Pete Townshend's Tommy at the Shaftesbury Theatre in 1996; and 'Meltzi' in Rob Bettinson's production of the Tommy Moeller, Greg Moeller, Russell Dunlop and Duke Minks musical Leonardo at the Strand Theatre in 1993.

"Stephen Fry's script for Cinderella bursts with sly innuendo, erudite wordplay and very knowing humour... This may be posh panto for the chattering classes but there's no doubting it's an extremely stylish affair. It's also an expensive-looking one - Stephen Brimson Lewis's gorgeous set resembles a series of ever more beguiling pop-up illustrations. Fiona Laird's robust production boasts several extremely strong performances, too, particularly Paul Keating's Buttons... Mark Lockyer and Hal Fowler excel as Ugly Sisters Dolce and Gabbana, a chavvy freak show seemingly straight out of Little Britain... This is slick, sparkly and, yes, clever enough to make those who secretly find panto a bit tedious fall in love all over again." The London Metro

"Stephen Fry's version of Cinderella is, perhaps, not surprisingly, as camp as a row of tents. Replete with wittier ditties than most pantomimes and festooned with topical references to popular culture, Fry's festive confection skirmishes with satire while retaining the dog-eared spirit of the form... Sandi Toksvig in a moustache and dressed like Beachcomber does a good job of holding the disparate elements together, doubling as the narrator and the Lord Chamberlain... But there are far too many tiresome theatrical in-jokes about the National Theatre, Ian McKellen, subsidies and budgetary constraints and I got the impression Fry wasn't so much creating a script as phoning in additional material and gags... It's a raucous night out. But if you're looking for a subtle variant on the dog-eared, end-of-the-pier, music-hall form, you will have to search elsewhere." The Daily Express

"This panto is an absolute blast. Nothing I have seen over the past year has made me laugh quite so heartily. When I tell you that Prince Charming doesn't merely get to marry Cinderella at the end, but Dandini also enters into a civil partnership with Buttons, you will no doubt think it all sounds toe-curlingly right-on. That would, however, be to overlook Fry's seductive way with words, his Sondheimian lyrics, the production's opulent design and the good humour and panache of the remarkable cast, under the direction of the spirited Fiona Laird. Madeleine Worrall's Cinderella - boringly obsessed with household cleaning products - is a particular delight. Pauline Collins makes a great job, too, of the Fairy Godmother, and the Ugly Sisters that Hal Fowler and Mark Lockyer turn in look deliciously like Posh Spice and Amy Winehouse... Sure, Cinderella is not like any panto that's gone before and it is in some respects an anti-panto panto, but, by golly, it's fun, and even if the children may not get most of the decidedly risque jokes, their parents certainly will and it's they, after all, who stump up for the tickets." The Sunday Telegraph

Cinderella in London at the Old Vic Theatre previewed from 4 December 2007, opened on 13 December 2007, and closed on 20 January 2008


2012/2013 (Sally Cookson / Tobacco Factory Theatre)

Previewed 12 December 2012, Opened 18 December 2012, Closed 26 January 2013 at the St James Theatre (now The Other Palace Theatre)
Previewed 26 November 2013, Opened 28 November 2013, Closed 5 January 2014 at the Unicorn Theatre

A fairytale for children aged 6 and above, written by Adam Peck and the company.

The cast for the Christmas 2012 season featured Lisa Kerr as 'Ella', Thomas Eccleshare as 'Prince', Craig Edwards as 'Step-Mother'/'Father', Lucy Tuck as 'Step-Sister'/'Queen', and Tom Godwin as 'Step-Brother'.

The cast for the Christmas 2013 season featured Sarah Kameela as 'Ella', Mark Kane as 'Prince', Philippe Spall as 'Step-Mother'/'Father', Jessica Murrain as 'Step-Sister'/'Queen', and Martins Imhangbe as 'Step-Brother'.

Directed by Sally Cookson, with choreography by Joel Daniel, designs by Katie Sykes, puppetry by Chris Pirie, lighting by Matthew Graham, and music by Benji Bower.

This production premiered at Bristol's Tobacco Factory Theatre - previewed from 7 December 2011, opened on 9 December 2011, and close on 15 January 2012 - with the same cast as at the St James Theatre with the exception of Saikat Ahamed who played the 'Step-Brother'.


2016 Paul O'Grady (Michael Harrison)

Previewed 9 December 2016, Opened 14 December 2016, Closed 15 January 2017 at the London Palladium

Pantomime returns to the world famous London Palladium for the first time in nearly 30 years!

Pantomime devised by Michael Harrison.

The cast featured Natasha J Barnes as 'Cinderella', Paul Zerdin as 'Buttons', Lee Mead as 'Prince Charming', Julian Clary as 'Dandini', Paul O'Grady as 'The Wicked Stepmother', Count Arthur Strong as 'Baron Hardup', Suzie Chard as 'Wicked Stepsister', Wendy Sommerville as 'Wicked Stepsister', Amanda Holden as 'The Fairy Godmother', and Nigel Havers as 'The Lord Chamberlain', with Carrie Sutton, Christopher Howell, Ed Wade, James Paterson, Liz Ewing, and Vicki Lee Taylor, with Charlotte Alloway, Chloe Hudson, Diana Girban, Emma Johnson, Gianni Arando, Holly Prentice, Jacob Fearey, Lucy Carter, Luke Woollaston, Myles Brown, Niall Swords, Pamela Blaire, Rhianne Alleyne, Ricky Lee Loftus, Tom Woollaston, and William Atkinson.

Directed by Michael Harrison, with choreography by Andrew Wright, sets by Ian Westbrook, costumes by Hugh Durrant and Mike Coltman, video by Duncan McLean, lighting by Ben Cracknell, music by Gary Hind, and sound by Gareth Owen.

Paul O'Grady's London theatre credits include playing the roles of 'Widow Twanky' in the pantomime Aladdin at the O2 Theatre in 2012; 'The Wicked Queen' in the pantomime Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs at the Victoria Palace Theatre in 2004; 'Child Catcher' in Adrian Noble's production of the Richard M Sherman and Robert B Sherman musical Chitty Chitty Bang Bang at the London Palladium in 2002; 'Miss Hannigan' in the Charles Strouse and Martin Charnin musical Annie at the Victoria Palace Theatre in 1998; and 'Lily Savage' Don Battye and Peter Pinne musical Prisoner Cell Block H at the Queen's Theatre in 1995.

Natasha J Barnes' London theatre credits include understudying and playing the role of 'Fanny Brice' in Michael Mayer's revival of Jule Styne and Bob Merrill musical Funny Girl at the Savoy Theatre in 2016.

Amanda Holden's London theatre credits include originating the role of 'Princess Fiona' in Jason Moore and Rob Ashford's West End premiere of the David Lindsay-Abaire and Jeanine Tesori musical Shrek at the Theatre Royal Drury Lane in 2011; and the title role of 'Millie Dillmount' in Michael Mayer's production of the Jeanine Tesori and Dick Scanlan musical Thoroughly Modern Millie at the Shaftesbury Theatre in 2003.

Lee Mead's London theatre credits include playing the roles of 'Emmett Forrest' in Jerry Mitchell's production of the Laurence O'Keefe and Nell Benjamin musical Legally Blonde at the Savoy Theatre in 2011; 'Fiyero' in Joe Mantello's production of Stephen Schwartz's Wicked at the Apollo Victoria Theatre in 2010; and the title role of 'Joseph' in Nichola Treherne's revival of the Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice musical Joseph and the Amazing Techicolor Dreamcoat at the Adelphi Theatre in 2007.

When this production opened in December 2016, Dominic Maxwell in the Times said that while, "there are faults with this disarmingly excessive production, but doing things by halves is not one of them.... this rampantly entertaining hoo-ha... It's naff, it's overblown, and I had a ball." Rod McPhee in the The Daily Mirror hailed it as being "a turbo-charged panto of epic proportions - oh yes it is!" Dominic Cavendish in the Daily Telegraph thought that, "even though he puts on a very eye-pleasing spectacle, I'm faintly incredulous at how much director Michael Harrison has allowed the spectre of smutty innuendo to attend this supposed feast of family entertainment." Michael Billington in the Guardian commented that "pantomime pitches camp at the London Palladium for the first time since 1987. You might say it overpitches it since this is, without doubt, the filthiest panto I've ever seen. It's less a show for all the family than for highly sophisticated grownups... To be fair, Michael Harrison's production is eye-poppingly spectacular." Quentin Letts in the Daily Mail described how "the London Palladium's Cinderella is a collector's item: a judicious cocktail of spangled filth, fairytale innocence and celebrity horseplay. It even has some original songs." Fiona Mountford in the London Evening Standard concluded that, "what Michael Harrison's colourful production essentially boils down to is a lengthy innuendo-off between Paul O'Grady as the wicked stepmother and Julian Clary as a Dandini who entirely overwhelms Lee Mead's Prince Charming. It's intermittently entertaining but wildly over-extended."

Pantomime Cinderella in London at the Palladium previewed from 9 December 2016, opened on 14 December 2016, and closed on 15 January 2017.