The Cherry Orchard

Play by Anton Chekhov. The Gaev family face bankruptcy and the loss of their estate. Even so, they refuse to sell their largest asset, their famous cherry orchard. The old world is giving way to the new, but the Gaevs seem not to have noticed the bewildering changes in the Russian way of life. The fate of the beautiful orchard becomes a symbol of the fate of all of the characters in this unassailable masterpiece. This is Chekhov's daring, droll meditation on bourgeois materialism and what remains in its wake.

The West End Premiere of The Cherry Orchard took place at the Aldwych Theatre in 1911 for two performances only, the first West End staging of a significant length took place in 1925 with a production that was originally staged at the Lyric Theatre Hammersmith, before transferring to the Royalty Theatre where it run for three months.

The role of sister and brother, Ranyevskaya and Gayev, was played by real life siblings Vanessa Redgrave and Corin Redgrave at the National Theatre in 2000.

The actress Patience Collier has the discintion of playing the same role, that of the governess 'Charlotta Ivanovna' in three completely different productions in London. She first played the role in John Gielgud's revival at the Lyric Hammersmith in 1954; then in Michel Saint-Denis's revival, for the Royal Shakespeare Company, at the Aldwych Theatre in 1961, and finally, taking over the role for the last 12 performances, in Peter Hall's revival at the National Theatre's Olivier Theatre in 1978.

The longest running production, in terms of actual performances, was Sam Mendes' revival at the Aldwych Theatre in 1989, with Judi Dench playing the lead role of 'Ranyevskaya', which run for a total of 174 performances (plus 12 previews) over a five month run. This was also the 24-year-old theatre director's West End directorial debut. Interestingly, 30 years later, Mendes directed the play in the West End for a second time, at the Old Vic Theatre in 2009 with Sinead Cusack as 'Ranyevskaya' and Ethan Hawke as 'Trofimov'.

1911: West End London Premiere with Katherine Pole

1920: 1st West End London Revival with Ethel Irving

1925: 2nd West End London Revival with Mary Grey

1928: 3rd West End London Revival by Prague Group of the Moscow Art Theatre

1931: 4rd West End London Revival by Prague Group of the Moscow Art Theatre

1933: 5th West End London Revival with Athene Seyler

1941: 6th West End London Revival with Athene Seyler

1948: 7th West End London Revival with Gladys Boot

1948: London Revival with Jean Anderson

1948: 8th West End London Revival with Edith Evans

1954: London Revival with Gwen Ffrangcon-Davies

1958: London Revival by Moscow Art Theatre

1961: 9th West End London Revival with Peggy Ashcroft, Judi Dench, John Gielgud

1964: 10th West End London Revival by Moscow Art Theatre

1967: 11th West End London Revival with Lila Kedrova

1973: 12th West End London Revival with Constance Cummings

1978: London Revival with Judy Parfitt

1978: London Revival with Dorothy Tutin, Robert Stephens, Albert Finney, Ben Kingsley

1982: London Revival with Alison Friske

1983: 13th West End London Revival with Joan Plowright

1985: London Revival with Sheila Hancock, Ian McKellen

1989: 14th West End London Revival with Judi Dench

1994: London Revival by the Maly Theatre, St Petersburg

1996: 15th West End London Revival with Penelope Wilton, Alec McCowen

2000: London Revival with Vanessa Redgrave, Corin Redgrave

2009: 16th West End London Revival with Sinead Cusack, Ethan Hawke

2011: 17th West End London Revival by Sovremennik Theatre, Moscow

2011: London Revival with Zoe Wanamaker

2014: London Revival with Kate Duchene

Anton Chekhov's plays include The Wood Demon, Uncle Vanya, The Three Sisters, The Seagull and Ivanov.


1911: West End London Premiere - Aldwych Theatre

Opened 28 May 1911, Closed 29 May 1911 at the Aldwych Theatre

Presented in an English version by Constance Garnett (Mrs Edward Garnett).

The cast included Katherine Pole as 'Lyubov Andreyevna Ranyevskaya', Vera Coburn as 'Anya', Mary Jerrold as 'Varya', Franklin Dyall as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev', Herbert Bunston as 'Yermolai Alexseyevich Lopakhin', Harcourt Williams as 'Pyetya Trofimov', Lola Duncan as 'Charlotta Ivanovna', and Nigel Playfair as 'Boris Borisovich Simeonov-Pishchik'.

Directed by Kenelm Foss.

Presented for two afternoon matinee performances by The Stage Society.


1920: 1st West End London Revival - St Martin's Theatre

Opened 11 July 1920, Closed 12 July 1920 at the St Martin's Theatre

Presented in an English version by Constance Garnett (Mrs Edward Garnett).

The cast included Ethel Irving as 'Lyubov Andreyevna Ranyevskaya', Irene Rathbone as 'Anya', Margery Bryce as 'Varya', Leyton Cancellor as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev', Joseph A Dodd as 'Yermolai Alexseyevich Lopakhin', Hesketh Pearson as 'Pyetya Trofimov', Edith Evans as 'Charlotta Ivanovna', and Felix Aylmer as 'Boris Borisovich Simeonov-Pishchik'.

Directed by Vera Donnet.

Presented for two performances only - on Sunday evening, and Monday afternoon matinee - by the Art Theatre Company.


1925: 2nd West End London Revival - Royalty Theatre

Opened 25 May 1925, Closed 20 June 1925 at the Lyric Hammersmith
Transferred 22 June 1925, Closed 19 September 1925 at the Royalty Theatre (now demolished)

Presented in an English version by George Calderon.

The cast included Mary Grey as 'Lyubov Andreyevna Ranyevskaya', Gwendolen Evans as 'Anya', Virginia Isham as 'Varya (named Barbara)', Alan Napier as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev', Fred O'Donovan as 'Yermolai Alexseyevich Lopakhin', John Gielgud as 'Pyetya Trofimov', Jane Ellis as 'Charlotta Ivanovna', and R S Smith as 'Boris Borisovich Simeonov-Pishchik'.

Directed by James Bernard Fagan.

The role of 'Varya' was renamed as 'Barbara' in this translation.

The 650-seater Royalty Theatre was located at 72-74 Dean Street, Soho, and is now an office block named 'Royalty House'.


1928: 3rd West End London Revival (Russian) - Garrick Theatre

Opened 11 April 1928, Closed 12 May 1928 (in repertory) at the Garrick Theatre

Performed in Russian for 11 performances by the Prague Group of the Moscow Art Theatre, in their first visit to London.

Directed by M N Germanova.

The Prague Group of the Moscow Art Theatre Season run at the Garrick Theatre from Saturday 7 April 1928 through to Saturday 12 May 1928 (it was due to finish on Saturday 5 May 1928, but due to popularity, the season was extended by one week).

The extended five-week repertory season also featured Fyodor Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov; Maxim Gorky's The Lower Depths; Alexander Ostrovsky's Poverty is No Crime (AKA Poverty in No Vice); Nikolai Gogol's Marriage; Leo Tolstoy's The Power of Darkness; Anton Chekhov's Uncle Vanya; and Leo Tolstoy's The Living Corpse, and a stage adaptation, in Russian, of Charles Dicken's The Battle of Life.


1931: 4rd West End London Revival (Russian) - Kingsway Theatre

Opened 26 December 1931, Closed 31 December 1931 (in repertory) at the Kingsway Theatre (now demolished)

Performed in Russian for four performances only by the Prague Group of the Moscow Art Theatre, in their second visit to London (see above).

Directed by P Pavlov.

The Prague Group of the Moscow Art Theatre Season run at the Kingsway Theatre for six-weeks from Tuesday 24 November 1931 through to Saturday 2 January 1932 and also featured Nikolai Gogol's The Government Inspector; Mikhail Bulgakov's The White Guard; Valentin Katayev's Quadrature of the Circle (AKA Squaring the Circle); Nikolai Gogol's Marriage; Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment; Maxim Gorky's The Lower Depth; Anton Chekhov Quadruple-Bill (Forgotten, Jubilee (AKA The Festivities), Proposal (AKA A Marriage Proposal), and Physician); and and a stage adaptation, in Russian, of Charles Dicken's The Cricket on the Hearth.

To celebrate the success of the season, a special 'Farewell Benefit Performance' was presented at the Kingsway Theatre on Saturday 9 January 1931 which featured various sketches and scenes from Anton Chekhov, Fyodor Dostoevsky and others, including some ballet performances by guest artistes.


1933: 5th West End London Revival - Old Vic Theatre

Opened 9 October 1933, 28 October 1933 at the Old Vic Theatre
Transferred 31 October 1933, 4 November 1933 at the Sadler's Wells
Returned 26 December 1933, 6 January 1934 at the Sadler's Wells

Presented in an English version by Hubert Butler.

The cast included Athene Seyler as 'Lyubov Andreyevna Ranyevskaya', Ursula Jeans as 'Anya', Flora Robson as 'Varya', Leon Quartermaine as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev' (October 1933), Alan Napier as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev' (December 1933), Charles Laughton as 'Yermolai Alexseyevich Lopakhin', Dennis Arundell as 'Pyetya Trofimov', Elsa Lanchester as 'Charlotta Ivanovna', and Roger Livesey as 'Boris Borisovich Simeonov-Pishchik'.

Directed by Tyrone Guthrie, with designs by Molly McArthur.

Presented by the Old Vic Company.


1941: 6th West End London Revival - New Theatre

Opened 28 August 1941, Closed 27 September 1941 at the New Theatre (now Noel Coward Theatre)

Presented in an English version by Hubert Butler.

The cast included Athene Seyler as 'Lyubov Andreyevna Ranyevskaya', Olive Layton as 'Anya', Rosalind Atkinson as 'Varya', Nicholas Hannen as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev', James Dale as 'Yermolai Alexseyevich Lopakhin', Walter Hudd as 'Pyetya Trofimov', Lucy Griffiths as 'Charlotta Ivanovna', and Stanford Holme as 'Boris Borisovich Simeonov-Pishchik'.

Directed by Tyrone Guthrie, with sets by Frederick Crooke, and costumes by Sophia Harris.

Presented by the Old Vic Company.


1948: 7th West End London Revival - St James's Theatre (now demolished)

Opened 1 June 1948, Closed 12 June 1948 at the St James's Theatre (now demolished)

Presented in an English version by J P Davis.

The cast included Gladys Boot as 'Lyubov Andreyevna Ranyevskaya', Catherine Bogie as 'Anya', Nancie Jackson as 'Varya', Cyril Luckman as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev', Eric Berry as 'Yermolai Alexseyevich Lopakhin', David Phethean as 'Pyetya Trofimov', Elaine Wodson as 'Charlotta Ivanovna', and Gerald Cross as 'Boris Borisovich Simeonov-Pishchik'.

Directed by John Fernald, with designs by Paul Mayo.

Presented by the Liverpool Playhouse as the first part of an eight-week 'Festival of Repertory'.

The 'Festival of Repertory' was presented by the producer Basil Dean in association with the British Theatre Group and the Arts Council, with the aim of providing a West End showcase for regional repertory companies. At the time, these did not usually transfer to London as the actors where needed to continue to perform in repertory at the regional theatre.

The other three Repertory Companies in the season where Sheffield Playhouse with Alfred Sangster's The Brontes (from 15 to 26 June); Birmingham Rep Theatre with Richard Brinsley Sheridan's The Rivals (from 29 June to 10 July); and Bristol Old Vic with William Shakespeare's Hamlet (from 13 to 24 July).

To fill in the two-week gap left in the Repertory Theatre's schedule, British Theatre Group's production of Ted Willis' new play No Trees in the Street, starring Beatrix Lehmann, was toured to the theatres during the gap. Following the finish of the 'Festival of Repertory', No Trees in the Street was presented at the St James's Theatre where it opened on 27 July 1948 (with no previews), and closed on 7 August 1948. It was later be adapted as a film in 1959 starring Sylvia Syms.

The 1,200-seater St James's Theatre was located in King Street, St James, opposite Bury Street.


1948: London Revival - Arts Theatre

Opened 9 September 1948, 10 October 1948 (in repertory) at the Arts Theatre

Presented in an English version by George Calderon.

The cast included Jean Anderson as 'Lyubov Andreyevna Ranyevskaya', Daphne Slater as 'Anya', Marjorie Stewart as 'Varya', Charles Lloyd Pack as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev', Elwyn Brook-Jones as 'Yermolai Alexseyevich Lopakhin', Marius Goring as 'Pyetya Trofimov', Pamela Stirling as 'Charlotta Ivanovna', and Wilfrid Walter as 'Boris Borisovich Simeonov-Pishchik'.

Directed by Peter Powell, with designs by Fanny Tylor.

Presented as part of the 'Festival of International Comedy and Drama' at the Arts Theatre Club.


1948: 8th West End London Revival - New Theatre

Opened 25 November 1948, Closed 15 January 1949 (in repertory) at the New Theatre (now Noel Coward Theatre)

Presented in an English version by Constance Garnett.

The cast included Edith Evans as 'Lyubov Andreyevna Ranyevskaya', Josephine Stuart as 'Anya', Mary Martlew as 'Varya', Cedric Hardwicke as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev', Mark Dignam as 'Yermolai Alexseyevich Lopakhin', Robert Eddison as 'Pyetya Trofimov', Faith Brook as 'Charlotta Ivanovna', and Cecil Winter as 'Boris Borisovich Simeonov-Pishchik'.

Directed by Hugh Hunt, with designs by Tanya Moiseiwitsch.

Presented by the Old Vic Company.


1954: London Revival - Lyric Theatre Hammersmith

Opened 21 May 1954, Closed 4 September 1954 at the Lyric Theatre Hammersmith

Presented in an English version by John Gielgud from a literal translation by Ariadne Nicolaeff.

The cast included Gwen Ffrangcon-Davies as 'Lyubov Andreyevna Ranyevskaya', Shirley Roberts as 'Anya', Pauline Jameson as 'Varya', Esme Percy as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev', Trevor Howard as 'Yermolai Alexseyevich Lopakhin', David Markham as 'Pyetya Trofimov', Patience Collier as 'Charlotta Ivanovna', and George Howe as 'Boris Borisovich Simeonov-Pishchik'.

Directed by John Gielgud, with designs by Richard Lake.


1958: London Revival (Russian) - Sadler's Wells Theatre

Opened 15 May 1958, Closed Closed 14 June 1958 (in repertory) at Sadler's Wells Theatre

Performed in Russian for 12 performances by the Moscow Art Theatre, in their first visit to London.

Directed by Viktor Y Stanitsyn, with designs by L N Silitch.

The Moscow Art Theatre Season run from Thursday 15 May 1958 through to Saturday 14 June 1958 and also included Anton Chekhov's Three Sisters and Uncle Vanya, and Leonid Rakhmanov's The Troubled Past (AKA Restless Old Age).

This was the first visit to London by the Moscow Art Theatre, although the Prague Group of the Moscow Art Theatre visited London in 1928 (see above).


1961: 9th West End London Revival - Aldwych Theatre

Opened 14 December 1961, Closed 17 March 1962 (in repertory) at the Aldwych Theatre

Presented in an English version by John Gielgud.

The cast included Peggy Ashcroft as 'Lyubov Andreyevna Ranyevskaya', Judi Dench as 'Anya', Dorothy Tutin as 'Varya', John Gielgud as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev', George Murcell as 'Yermolai Alexseyevich Lopakhin', Ian Holm as 'Pyetya Trofimov', Patience Collier as 'Charlotta Ivanovna', and Paul Hardwick as 'Boris Borisovich Simeonov-Pishchik'. The cast also included Roy Dotrice as 'Firs'.

Directed by Michel Saint-Denis, with designs by Abd'Elkader Farrah, lighting by John Wyckham, music by Brian Priestman, and sound by Roberto Gerhard.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1964: 10th West End London Revival (Russian) - Aldwych Theatre

Opened 29 May 1964, Closed 11 June 1964 (in repertory) at the Aldwych Theatre

Performed in Russian for eight performances by the Moscow Art Theatre.

Directed by Viktor Y Stanitsyn, with designs by L N Silitch.

Presented as part of Peter Daubeny's 'World Theatre Season', in association with the Royal Shakespeare Company.

The Moscow Art Theatre Season run from Tuesday 26 May to Saturday 13 June 1964, and also included Nikolai Gogol's Dead Souls, and Nikolai Pogodin's Kremlin Chimes (AKA The Chimes of the Kremlin).


1967: 11th West End London Revival - Queen's Theatre

Opened 5 October 1967, Closed 18 November 1967 at the Queen's Theatre (now Sondheim Theatre)

Presented in an English version by Richard Cottrell.

The cast included Lila Kedrova as 'Lyubov Andreyevna Ranyevskaya', Marty Cruickshank as 'Anya', Stephanie Bidmead as 'Varya', James Cairncross as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev', Patrick Wymark as 'Yermolai Alexseyevich Lopakhin', Terry Scully as 'Pyetya Trofimov', Hazel Hughes as 'Charlotta Ivanovna', and John Byron as 'Boris Borisovich Simeonov-Pishchik'.

Directed by Richard Cottrell, with designs by Hutchinson Scott, and music by Benjamin Pearce Higgins.


1973: 12th West End London Revival - Old Vic Theatre

Previewed 20 May 1973, Opened 24 May 1973, Closed 17 January 1974 (in repertory) at the Old Vic Theatre

Presented in an English version by Ronald Hingley.

The original cast included Constance Cummings as 'Lyubov Andreyevna Ranyevskaya', Anna Carteret as 'Anya', Gillian Barge as 'Varya', Michael Hordern as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev', Denis Quilley as 'Yermolai Alexseyevich Lopakhin', David Bradley as 'Pyetya Trofimov', Maggie Riley as 'Charlotta Ivanovna', and Kenneth Mackintosh as 'Boris Borisovich Simeonov-Pishchik', with Richard Howard as 'Yepikhodov', Louise Purnell as 'Dunyasha', Harry Lomax as 'Firs', and David Firth as 'Yasha'.

Directed by Michael Blakemore, with sets by Alan Tagg, costumes by Beatrice Dawson, lighting by Leonard Tucker, and music by Marc Wilkinson.

Presented by the National Theatre.


1978: London Revival - Riverside Studios

Previewed 6 January 1978, Opened 12 January 1978, Closed 5 February 1978 at the Riverside Studios

Presented in an English version by Peter Gill.

The cast included Judy Parfitt as 'Lyubov Andreyevna Ranyevskaya', Caroline Langrishe as 'Anya', Julie Covington as 'Varya', Philip Locke as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev', Micheal Elphick as 'Yermolai Alexseyevich Lopakhin', Stephen Rea as 'Pyetya Trofimov', Eleanor Bron as 'Charlotta Ivanovna', and Wensley Pithey as 'Boris Borisovich Simeonov-Pishchik', with David Pugh as 'Yepikhodov', Elizabeth Estenson as 'Dunyasha', George Howe as 'Firs', Leigh Lawson as 'Yasha', Sean Lawton, Shirley King, Ron Pember, and Stephen Petcher.

Directed by Peter Gill, with sets by William Dudley, costumes by Pamela Howard, lighting by Rory Dempster, and music by George Fenton.

This production marked the opening of the Riverside Studios, at Crisp Road, Hammersmith, as a live performance space.


1978: London Revival - Olivier Theatre

Previewed 2 February 1978, Opened 14 February 1978, Closed 18 November 1978 (in repertory) at the National Theatre's Olivier Theatre

Presented in an English version by Michael Frayn.

The cast included Dorothy Tutin as 'Lyubov Andreyevna Ranyevskaya', Judi Bowler as 'Anya', Susan Fleetwood as 'Varya', Robert Stephens as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev', Albert Finney as 'Yermolai Alexseyevich Lopakhin', Ben Kingsley as 'Pyetya Trofimov', Helen Ryan as 'Charlotta Ivanovna', and Terence Rigby as 'Boris Borisovich Simeonov-Pishchik', with Nicky Henson as 'Yepikhodov', Susan Littler as 'Dunyasha', Ralph Richardson as 'Firs', Derek Thompson as 'Yasha', Norman Claridge, Edna Dore, Irene Gorst, Tamara Hinchco, Martin Howells, Brian Kent, Marianne Morley, Peter Needham, Richard Perkins, Peter Rocca, Keith Skinner, Daniel Thorndike, Dennis Tynsley, and Janet Whiteside.

Directed by Peter Hall, with choreography by Sally Gilpin, designs by John Bury, lighting by David Hersey, music by Harrison Birtwistle and Dominic Muldowney, and sound by Julian Beech and Ric Green.

For the last 12 performances, from Wednesday 18 October 1978, Patience Collier took over as 'Charlotta Ivanovna'. This was the third time that she had played the same role in three completely different productions in London: the other two occasions being John Gielgud's revival at the Lyric Hammersmith in 1954; and Michel Saint-Denis's revival, for the Royal Shakespeare Company, at the Aldwych Theatre in 1961.

Other cast changes towards the end of the run included Martin Howells taking over from Ben Kingsley as 'Pyetya Trofimov', Robin Bailey taking over from Ralph Richardson as 'Firs', and Tel Stevens taking over as 'Dunyasha'.


1982: London Revival - The Roundhouse

Previewed 6 August 1982, Opened 9 August 1982, Closed 28 August 1982 at the Roundhouse

Presented in an English version by Mike Alfreds and Lilia Sokolov.

The cast included Alison Friske as 'Lyubov Andreyevna Ranyevskaya', Chloe Salaman as 'Anya', Maggie Wells as 'Varya', Charles McKeown as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev', Roger Sloman as 'Yermolai Alexseyevich Lopakhin', John Dicks as 'Pyetya Trofimov', Pam Ferris as 'Charlotta Ivanovna', and Christopher Ettridge as 'Boris Borisovich Simeonov-Pishchik', with Raad Rawi as 'Yepikhodov', Laura Cox as 'Dunyasha', David Blake Kelly as 'Firs', Michael Maynard as 'Yasha', Sue Merry, and Harold Saks.

Directed by Mike Alfreds, with choreography by Amanda Knott, designs by Nadine Baylis, lighting by David Colmer, and music by Ilona Sekacz.

Presented by the Oxford Playhouse Theatre Company.


1983: 13th West End London Revival - Haymarket Theatre

Previewed 12 October 1983, Opened 18 October 1983, Closed 19 November 1983 at the Haymarket Theatre

The cast included Joan Plowright as 'Lyubov Andreyevna Ranyevskaya', Cora Kinnaird as 'Anya', Joanna David as 'Varya', Leslie Phillips as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev', Frank Finlay as 'Yermolai Alexseyevich Lopakhin', Frank Grimes as 'Pyetya Trofimov', Margaret Robertson as 'Charlotta Ivanovna', and Bill Fraser as 'Boris Borisovich Simeonov-Pishchik', with David Battley as 'Yepikhodov', Bernadette Shortt as 'Dunyasha', Bernard Miles as 'Firs', Michael Siberry as 'Yasha', Norman Caro, Mark Lee Conroy, Zeph Gladstone, David Kincaid, Aletta Lawson, Anthony Shirvell, and Jacqueline Skarvellis.

Directed by Lindsay Anderson, with sets by Kenneth Mellor, costumes by Mark Negin, lighting by Andy Phillips, and sound by Derrick Zieba.

From the Edinburgh Festival where this production was staged at the Royal Lyceum Theatre from 5 to 10 September 1983, with the same cast with the exception of Catherine Willmer as 'Charlotta Ivanovna'.


1985: London Revival - Cottesloe Theatre

Previewed 3 December 1985, Opened 10 December 1985, Closed 19 April 1986 (in repertory) at the National Theatre's Cottesloe Theatre (now Dorfman Theatre)

Presented in an English version by Mike Alfreds and Lilia Sokolov.

The cast featured Sheila Hancock as 'Lyubov Andreyevna Ranyevskaya', Claire Moore as 'Anya', Eleanor Bron as 'Varya', Edward Petherbridge as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev', Ian McKellen as 'Yermolai Alexseyevich Lopakhin', Laurance Rudic as 'Pyetya Trofimov', Julie Legrand as 'Charlotta Ivanovna', and Roy Kinnear as 'Boris Borisovich Simeonov-Pishchik', with Greg Hicks as 'Yepikhodov', Selina Cadell as 'Dunyasha', Hugh Lloyd as 'Firs', Jonathan Hyde as 'Yasha', Simon Dutton, Peter Needham, and Tristram Wymark.

Directed by Mike Alfreds, with choreography by Sue Lefton, designs and lighting by Paul Dart, music by Ilona Sekacz, and sound by Anthony Waldron.


1989: 14th West End London Revival - Aldwych Theatre

Previewed 12 October 1989, Opened 24 October 1989, Closed 24 March 1990 at the Aldwych Theatre

Presented in an English version by Michael Frayn.

The cast featured Judi Dench as 'Lyubov Andreyevna Ranyevskaya', Miranda Foster as 'Anya', Lesley Manville as 'Varya', Ronald Pickup as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev', Bernard Hill as 'Yermolai Alexseyevich Lopakhin', Nicholas Farrell as 'Pyetya Trofimov', Kate Duchene as 'Charlotta Ivanovna', and Barry Stanton as 'Boris Borisovich Simeonov-Pishchik', with Tom Watt as 'Yepikhodov', Abigail McKern as 'Dunyasha', Michael Gough as 'Firs', John Dougall as 'Yasha', Kate Anthony, Tom Hollander, Stanley Page, Patricia Samuels, and Peter Sowerbutts.

Directed by Sam Mendes, with designs by Paul Farnsworth, lighting by Mick Hughes, and music by Corin Buckeridge.

This production marked the West End debut for the 24-year-old theatre director Sam Mendes.


1994: London Revival (Russian) - Lyric Theatre Hammersmith

Opened 14 April 1994, Closed 17 April 1994 at the Lyric Hammersmith

Performed in Russian for five performances by the The Maly Theatre, St Petersburg.

Directed by Lev Dodin, with designs by Eduard Kochergin.


1996: 15th West End London Revival - Albery Theatre

Previewed 21 November 1996, Opened 25 November 1996, Closed 25 January 1997 at the Albery Theatre (now Noel Coward Theatre)

Presented in an English version by Peter Gill.

The cast featured Penelope Wilton as 'Lyubov Andreyevna Ranyevskaya', Emilia Fox as 'Anya', Kate Duchene as 'Varya', Alec McCowen as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev', David Troughton as 'Yermolai Alexseyevich Lopakhin', Sean Murray as 'Pyetya Trofimov', Darlene Johnson as 'Charlotta Ivanovna', and James Hayes as 'Boris Borisovich Simeonov-Pishchik', with John Dougall as 'Yepikhodov', Louise Gold as 'Dunyasha', Peter Copley as 'Firs', Mark Lockyer as 'Yasha', Harriet Cater, Steven Elder, Charlotte Longfield, John Nash, and Tim Thomas.

Directed by Adrian Noble, with choreography by Sue Lefton, designs by Richard Hudson, lighting by Wayne Dowdeswell, music by Stephen Warbeck, and sound by Charles Horne.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


2000/2001: London Revival - Cottesloe and Olivier Theatres

Previewed 15 September 2000, Opened 21 September 2000, Closed 25 January 2001 (in repertory) at the National Theatre's Cottesloe Theatre (now Dorfman Theatre)
Transferred 3 February 2001, Closed 31 March 2001 (in repertory) at the National Theatre's Olivier Theatre

Presented in an English version by David Lan from a literal translation by Helen Rappaport.

The cast featured Vanessa Redgrave as 'Lyubov Andreyevna Ranyevskaya', Charlotte Emmerson as 'Anya', Eve Best as 'Varya', Corin Redgrave as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev' (Cottesloe Theatre only), Stephen Moore as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev' (Olivier Theatre only), Roger Allam as 'Yermolai Alexseyevich Lopakhin', Ben Miles as 'Pyetya Trofimov', Suzanne Bertish as 'Charlotta Ivanovna', and William Gaunt as 'Boris Borisovich Simeonov-Pishchik', with Richard Henders as 'Yepikhodov', Maxine Peake as 'Dunyasha', Michael Bryant as 'Firs', James Thornton as 'Yasha', Kate Dyson, Peter Eastland, Michael Gardiner, John Harwood (Olivier Theatre only), Seymour Matthews, Rebekah McGowan, Gary Oliver, Jennifer Scott-Malden, and Katie Wimpenny.

Directed by Trevor Nunn, with choreography by Jane Gibson, designs by Maria Bjornson, lighting by Hugh Vanstone, music by Steve Edis, sound by Paul Groothuis.

"In Trevor Nunn's magnificent new production of The Cherry Orchard... The generous neutrality of Chekhov's vision is everywhere apparent in the richly detailed ensemble work of this company. After a number of disappointingly tame recent Ranevskayas, Vanessa Redgrave plays this maddening, captivating woman like some great exotic, wild, soon-to-be-extinct bird, at the mercy of every buffeting gust of emotion and blind to what might help her survive... The actress's brother Corin plays Gaev, her brother in the play, and he turns in a brilliantly comic portrait of a pampered old maid and inveterate, sentimental snob... True to Chekhov, there are many moments when you don't kmow whether to laugh or cry." The Independent

"The orchard will be cut down for country cottages. Vanessa Redgrave's Ranevskaya, an impulsive, self-absorbed landowner who cannot bear to face the truth, represents the spirit of the past. Corin Redgrave, too, as her billlards-obsessed, dandified, ever-nattering brother Gaev, does not believe what people say even when they stare him straight in the eyes and say it. The present grim reality is embodied in the businessman, Lophakin, the first 20th century impresario, played with pressing and subtle vigour by Roger Allam. He finally buys up the cherry orchard, and the estate, where his peasant forefathers were not even allowed in the kitchen. And the future? The tutor of Ranevskaya's dead son, Trotlmov, tells her daughter, Anya, that a class who profited in the ownership of people can only be redeemed through work. The arguments are carefully sharpened in David Lan's fine new version, and Trevor Nunn's meticulous production." The Daily Mail

The Cherry Orchard in London at the National Theatre's Cottesloe Theatre previewed from 15 September 2000, opened on 21 September 2000, and closed on 25 January 2001 (in repertory), transferred to the National Theatre's Olivier Theatre from 3 February 2001, and closed on 31 March 2001 (in repertory)


2009: 16th West End London Revival - Old Vic Theatre

Previewed 23 May 2009, Opened 9 June 2009, Closed 15 August 2009 (in repertory) at the Old Vic Theatre

Presented in an English version by Tom Stoppard.

The cast featured Sinead Cusack as 'Lyubov Andreyevna Ranyevskaya', Morven Christie as 'Anya', Rebecca Hall as 'Varya', Paul Jesson as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev', Simon Russell Beale as 'Yermolai Alexseyevich Lopakhin', Ethan Hawke as 'Pyetya Trofimov', Selina Cadell as 'Charlotta Ivanovna', and Dakin Matthews as 'Boris Borisovich Simeonov-Pishchik', with Tobias Segal as 'Yepikhodov', Charlotte Parry as 'Dunyasha', Richard Easton as 'Firs', John Hamilton as 'Yasha', Michael Braun, Aaron Krohn, Mark Nelson, Jessica Pollert Smith, Gary Powell, and Hannah Stokely.

Directed by Sam Mendes, with choreography by Josh Prince, sets by Anthony Ward, costumes by Catherine Zuber, lighting by Paul Pyant, music by Mark Bennett, and sound by Pau Arditti.

This production played in repertory with William Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale. The two productions where presented as part of the The Bridge Project, an unprecedented three-year, transatlantic partnership uniting The Old Vic Theatre in London with The Brooklyn Academy of Music in New York, and Neal Street Productions. The Winter's Tale and The Cherry Orchard are the first two productions in this partnership. The cast are appearing with the permission of American Equity and UK Equity.

"If Ethan Hawke is not so impressive in The Cherry Orchard then this is really Sinead Cusack's turn to shine. She is Ranevskaya, who returns to her country estate just as it must be sold to pay creditors. In a beautifully pitched performance she is excitable, exuberant, deeply affectionate and desperately romantic. Rebecca Hall may not be as comfortable as spurned Varya but Simon Russell Beale is outstanding as serf-turned-landowner Lopakhin. Tom Stoppard's new version brings out the comedy of this bitter-sweet work. If this is season one of Mendes's world-touring transatlantic experiment, bring on season two." The Daily Express

"Simon Russell Beale also dominates The Cherry Orchard with his love-sick Lopakhin: another man moved to extremes by jealousy, this time against the land-owning family for whom his ancestors once worked. Seismic class shifts and a keen anticipation of the forthcoming revolution take centre stage as Sinead Cusack's flighty but insufficiently interesting Ranevskaya and her brother refuse to save themselves. Yet the production's long autumnal notes are too whimsical; and the loss of the estate is without tragedy." The London Metro

"There's more atmosphere and theatrical magic generally in Tom Stoppard's brisk, blustery new version of The Cherry Orchard, especially in the splendid second half. That's no thanks, though, to Ethan Hawke's unpersuasive tutor, who thinks he knows what's what. Once again, Rebecca Hall and Simon Russell Beale shine brightest... Designer Anthony Ward's nursery of child-sized furniture deftly makes Chekhov's point that this is a return to childhood for some of the characters, specially Ranevskaya and her brother, neither of whom have grown up and taken responsibility for their own lives. Cusack's character is vain, flirtatious, sentimental and silly - congenitally incapable of seeing the wood for the cherry trees and realising how easily the estate might be saved - but also sympathetic enough to make you believe that Chekhov has a soft spot for the old order." The Mail on Sunday

Sinead Cusack's London theatre credits include the roles of 'Eleanor'/'older Esma' in Trevor Nunn's prodcution of Tom Stoppard's Rock'n'Roll at the Royal Court Theare, and transfer to the West End's Duke of York's Theatre in 2006; 'Grace' in Joe Dowling's revival of Brian Friel's Faith Healer at the Royal Court Theatre in 1992; 'Masha' in Adrian Noble's revival of Anton Chekhov's Three Sisters at the Royal Court Theatre in 1990; and 'Juliet' in Michael Croft's revival of William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet at the Shaw Theatre in 1972. For the Royal Shakespeare Company in London Sinead Cusack has performed the roles of 'Cleopatra' in Michael Attenborough's revival of Antony and Cleopatra at the Haymarket Theatre in 2002; 'Lady Macbeth' in Adrian Noble's revival of Macbeth at the Barbican Theatre in 1987; 'Katherina' in Barry Kyle's revival of Taming of the Shrew at the Barbican Theatre in 1983; 'Celia' in Terry Hands' revival of As You Like It at the Aldwych Theatre in 1981; and 'Isabella' in Barry Kyle's revival of Measure for Measure at the Aldwych Theatre in 1979.

Paul Jesson's London theatre credits include the roles of 'Sir Toby Belch' in Sam Mendes' revival of William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night at the Donmar Warehouse in 2002; 'Mr Braddock' in the original cast of Terry Johnson's production of Charles Webb's The Graduate at the Gielgud Theatre in 2000; 'Prospero' in David Thacker's revival of William Shakespeare's The Tempest at the Young Vic Theatre in 1995; 'Ulysses' in Sam Mendes' revival of William Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida, for the Royal Shakespeare Company, at the Barbican Pit Theatre in 1991; 'Eilert Lovborg' in Howard Davies' revival of Henrik Ibsen's Hedda Gabler at the National Theatre's Olivier Theatre in 1989; 'Gooper' in Howard Davies' revival of Tennessee Williams' Cat on a Hot Tin Roof at the National Theatre's Lyttelton Theatre in 1988; and 'Gilles de Rais, Bluebeard'/'Canon de Courcelles' in John Dove's revival of George Bernard Shaw's Saint Joan at the Old Vic Theatre in 1977.

The Cherry Orchard in London at the Old Vic Theatre previewed from 23 May 2009, opened on 9 June 2009, and closed on 15 August 2009 (in repertory)


2011: 17th West End London Revival (Russian) - Noel Coward Theatre

Opened 28 January 2011, Closed 29 January 2011 at the Noel Coward Theatre

Performed in Russian for two performances only by Sovremennik Theatre, Moscow, for their visit to London.

Directed by Galina Volchek, with designs by Pavel Kaplevich and Pyotr Kirillov.

The Sovremennik Theatre Season run from Friday 21 to Saturday 29 January 2011, and also included Anton Chekhov's Three Sisters, and Yevgenia Ginzburg's Into the Whirlwind, adapted for the stage by Alexandr Getman.


2011: London Revival - Olivier Theatre

Previewed 10 May 2011, Opened 17 May 2011, Closed 13 August 2011 (in repertory) at the National Theatre's Olivier Theatre

Presented in an English version by Andrew Upton.

The cast featured Zoe Wanamaker as 'Lyubov Andreyevna Ranyevskaya', Charity Wakefield as 'Anya', Claudie Blakley as 'Varya', James Laurenson as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev', Conleth Hill as 'Yermolai Alexseyevich Lopakhin', Mark Bonnar as 'Pyetya Trofimov', Sarah Woodward as 'Charlotta Ivanovna', and Tim McMullan as 'Boris Borisovich Simeonov-Pishchik', with Pip Carter as 'Yepikhodov', Emily Taaffe as 'Dunyasha', Kenneth Cranham as 'Firs', Gerald Kyd as 'Yasha', Craige Els, Paul Dodds, Mark Fleischmann, Colin Haigh, Jessica Regan, Tim Samuels, Stephanie Thomas, Joseph Thompson, Rosie Thomson, and Ellie Turner.

Directed by Howard Davies, with choreography by Lynne Page, designs by Bunny Christie, lighting by Neil Austin, music by Dominic Muldowney, and sound by Paul Groothuis.

"Andrew Upton has given Chekhov a robust reworking in this version of the Russian playwright's last work... The rash of verbal anachronisms is part of a determined attempt not to sentimentalise this masterful comedy but they seem crass within Howard Davies's pretty faithfully period production... Despite this, Davies has crafted a funny and affecting production with an excellent cast, who capture the wild exuberance and piercing melancholy of Chekhov's prescient play as they whirl round Bunny Christie's evocatively ramshackle wooden set... Davies's finely detailed direction means it's rewarding to watch peripheral faces in this vigorous but touching interpretation." The London Metro

"Touching the exact interpretative notes of Chekhov is always a challenge for actors but Zoe Wanamaker's Madame Ranyevskaya is right on key. She portrays, quite effortlessly, the blindness and indifference of a woman who refuses to recognise reality... James Laurenson is comically superb as Gaev, her talkative brother who jabbers about life like some hyped-up parrot as he tries to make philosophical observations while playing invisible billiard shots. And Mark Bonnar, with a See-You-Jimmy Glasgow accent, brings a political passion to the role of Petya, the eternal radical student. Director Howard Davies keeps the pace rattling along and Bunny Christie's clever, flexible set works perfectly." The Daily Express

Zoe Wanamaker's London theatre credits include the roles of 'Kate Keller' in Howard Davies' revival of Arthur Miller's All My Sons at the Apollo Theatre in 2010; 'Anna' in Phyllida Lloyd's staging of David Mamet's Boston Marriage at the Donmar Warehouse and Ambassadors Theatre in 2001; the title role (the dog!) in Michael Blakemore's production of A R Gurney's Sylvia at the Apollo Theatre in 1996; 'Amanda Wingfield' in Sam Mendes' revival of Tennessee Williams' The Glass Menagerie at the Donmar Warehouse and transfer to the Comedy Theatre in 1995; 'Eleanor' in Terry Johnson's Dead Funny at the Hampstead Theatre and transfer to the Vaudeville Theatre in 1994; 'Kattrin' in Howard Davies' revival of Bertolt Brecht's Mother Courage and Her Children, for the Royal Shakespeare Company, at the Barbican Theatre in 1984; 'Gwendolen Fairfax' in Peter Hall's revival of Oscar Wilde's The Importance Of Being Earnest at the National Theatre's Lyttelton Theatre in 1982; 'Toine' in Pam Gems' Piaf at the Donmar Warehouse, and transfer to the West End's Aldwych in 1979, and Wyndham's and Piccadilly Theatres in 1980; 'Bianca' in Michael Bogdanov's revival of William Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew, for the Royal Shakespeare Company, at the Aldwych Theatre in 1979; and 'Martha Babakina' in David Jones' revival of Anton Chekhov's Ivanov, for the Royal Shakespeare Company, at the Aldwych Theatre in 1976.

James Laurenson's London theatre credits include the roles of 'Colonel Pickering' in Peter Hall's revival of George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion at the Old Vic Theatre in 2008; 'Brabantio' in Michael Grandage's revival of William Shakespeare's Othello at the Donmar Warehouse in 2007; 'Vladimir' in Peter Hall's revival of Samuel Beckett's Waiting For Godot at the Ambassadors Theatre in 2006; 'James' in Michael Grandage's revival of Peter Nichols' Passion Play at the Donmar Warehouse, and transfer to the West End's Comedy Theatre in 2000; 'Macduff' in Richard Eyre's revival of William Shakespeare's Macbeth at the National Theatre's Olivier Theatre in 1993; and 'Julian Marsh' in Lucia Victor's production of the Al Dubin and Harry Warren musical 42nd Street at the Theatre Royal Drury Lane in 1984.

Conleth Hill's London theatre credits include the roles of 'Petesy' in Robert Delamere's production of Owen McCafferty's Shoot The Crow at the Trafalgar Studios in 2005; 'Roger De Bris' in the original cast of Susan Stroman's production of Mel Brooks' The Producers at the Theatre Royal Drury Lane in 2004; 'Gunter Guillaume' in Michael Blakemore's production of Michael Frayn's Democracy at the National Theatre's Cottesloe Theatre in 2003 and Lyttelton Theatre 2004, and West End transfer to the Wyndham's Theatre in 2004; and 'Charlie Conlon' in the original cast of Ian McElhinney's production of Marie Jones' Stones in his Pockets at the Ambassadors Theatre in 2000, and transfer to Duke of York's Theatre in 2000, for which he won the Olivier Award for 'Best Actor'.

The Cherry Orchard in London at the National Theatre's Olivier Theatre previewed from 10 May 2011, opened on 17 May 2011, and closed on 13 August 2011 (in repertory)


2014: London Revival - Young Vic

Previewed 10 October 2014, Opened 16 October 2014, Closed 29 November 2014 at the Young Vic

Presented in an English version by Simon Stephens.

The cast featured Kate Duchene as 'Lyubov Andreyevna Ranyevskaya', Catrin Stewart as 'Anya', Natalie Klamar as 'Varya', Angus Wright as 'Leonid Andreyevick Gayev', Dominic Rowan as 'Yermolai Alexseyevich Lopakhin', Paul Hilton as 'Pyetya Trofimov', Sarah Malin as 'Charlotta Ivanovna', and Stephen Kennedy as 'Boris Borisovich Simeonov-Pishchik', with Hugh Skinner as 'Yepikhodov', Sarah Ridgeway as 'Dunyasha', Gawn Grainger as 'Firs', Tom Mothersdale as 'Yasha', Cavan Clarke, Andy Cresswell, Peter Hobday, and Sarah Malin.

Directed by Katie Mitchell, with choreography by Joseph Alford, scenic design by Vicki Mortimer, lighting by James Farncombe, music by Paul Clark, and sound design by Gareth Fry.