And Then There Were None

Thriller by Agatha Christie. Ten little soldier boys went out to dine... One choked his little self and then there were nine... Over dinner, 10 strangers on an island retreat are each accused of hiding a terrible secret. Then one by one, they begin to die - horribly...

Based on her 1939 novel, the World Premiere of the stage adaptation took place at the Wimbledon Theatre on Monday 20 September 1943 which was followed by a regional tour, and transfer to London's West End.

1943: Original West End London Production

1962: 1st West End London Revival

1987: 2nd West End London Revival

2005: 3rd West End London Revival

Agatha Christie's And Then There Were None remains her best-selling individual title in the UK. Her stage whodunit The Mousetrap is currently playing at London's St Martin's Theatre. Agath Christie's other London theatre thrillers include the courtroom drama Witness for the Prosecution.


1943: Original West End London Production

Opened 17 November 1943 (no previews), Closed 23 February 1944 at the St James's Theatre (now demolished)
Transferred 29 February 1944, Closed 6 May 1944 at the Cambridge Theatre
Transferred 9 May 1944, Closed 1 July 1944 at the St James's Theatre (now demolished)

Presented under the title: Ten Little Niggers.

The cast featured Terence de Marney as 'Captain Philip Lombard', Michael Blake as 'Anthony Marston', Percy Walsh as 'William Blore', Eric Cowley as 'General Mackenzie', Allan Jeayes as 'Sir Lawrence Wargrave', Gwyn Nicholls as 'Dr Armstrong', Linden Travers as 'Vera Claythorne', Henrietta Watson as 'Emily Brent', William Murray as 'Rogers', Hilda Bruce-Potter as 'Mrs Rogers', and Reginald Barlow as 'Narracot'.

Directed by Irene Hentschel, with designs by Clifford Pember.

On the night of Wednesday 23 February 1944, as part of the World War II 'London Blitz' bombing ccampaign, four high explosive bombs where dropped in the immediate vicinity of the St James's Theatre, causing significant damage, and nine fatalities. This forced the production to move temporarily to the Cambridge Theatre before returning to the St James's Theatre.

Prior to London's West End this production, with the same cast, embarked on an eight-week regional tour: Wimbledon Theatre from Monday 20 September to Saturday 25 September 1943; Harrow Coliseum Theatre from Monday 27 September to Saturday 2 October 1943; Northampton New Theatre from Monday 4 October to Saturday 9 October 1943; Grand Blackpool Grand Theatre from Monday 11 October to Saturday 16 October 1943; Hull New Theatre from Monday 18 October to Saturday 23 October 1943; New Oxford New Theatre from Monday 25 October to Saturday 30 October 1943; Newcastle Theatre Royal from Monday 1 November to Saturday 6 October 1943; and Liverpool Royal Court Theatre from Monday 8 November to Saturday 13 November 1943.

The 1,200-seater St James's Theatre was located on the south side of King Street, St James, opposite Bury Street.


1962: 1st West End London Revival

Opened 10 September 1962 (no previews), Closed 6 October 1962 at the St Martins Theatre

Presented under the title: Ten Little Niggers.

The cast featured Robin Hunter as 'Captain Philip Lombard', Shaun Howard as 'Anthony Marston', Garry Marsh as 'William Blore', Roger Maxwell as 'General Mackenzie', John Robinson as 'Sir Lawrence Wargrave', Jack Melford as 'Dr Armstrong', Ann Castle as 'Vera Claythorne', Beatrice Varley as 'Emily Brent', John Rutland as 'Rogers', Gillian Lind as 'Mrs Rogers', and Denzil Ellis as 'Narracot'.

Directed by Wallace Douglas, with designs by Michael Yates.


1987: 2nd West End London Revival

Previewed 29 September 1987, Opened 7 October 1987, Closed 4 June 1988 at the Duke of York's Theatre
Returned 1 August 1988, Closed 8 October 1988 at the Strand Theatre (now Novello Theatre)

The cast at the Duke of York's Theatre featured Geoffrey Davies as 'Captain Philip Lombard', Michael Remick as 'Anthony Marston', Rodney Bewes as 'William Blore', Geoffrey Toone as 'General Mackenzie', John Fraser as 'Sir Lawrence Wargrave', Jack Hedley as 'Dr Armstrong', Glynis Barber as 'Vera Claythorne' (up to Saturday 6 February 1988), Koo Stark as 'Vera Claythorne' (from Monday 8 February 1988), Miriam Karlin as 'Emily Brent', James Tomlinson as 'Rogers', Maryann Turner as 'Mrs Rogers', and Peter Porteous as 'Narracot'.

The cast at the Strand Theatre featured James Warwick as 'Captain Philip Lombard', Michael Remick as 'Anthony Marston', Rodney Bewes as 'William Blore', Michael Malnick as 'General Mackenzie', Derek Waring as 'Sir Lawrence Wargrave', Harvey Ashby as 'Dr Armstrong', Sophie Doherty as 'Vera Claythorne', Maryann Turner as 'Emily Brent', Charles Rea as 'Rogers', Judy Wilson as 'Mrs Rogers', and John Channell 'Mills as Narracot'.

Directed by Kenneth Alan Taylor, with designs by Robert Jones, and lightng by Jason Taylor.

Prior to London's West End this production was staged at the Nottingham Playhouse from Wednesday 2 September to Saturday 26 September 1987 with the same cast.


2005: 3rd West End London Revival

Previewed 14 October 2005, Opened 25 October 2005, Closed 14 January 2006 at the Gielgud Theatre

A new stage adaptation by Kevin Elyot of Agatha Christie's And Then There Were None in London

This new stage adaptation of Agatha Christie's And Then There Were None by Kevin Elyot promises a gruesome twist to attract a younger audience more used to horror and violence than gentle whodunnits.

The producer of And Then There Were None, Nick Salmon, says: "Kevin Elyot went back to the original book and he has updated it to modern sensibilities. Some of it is quite Tarantinoesque. In the original Christie, the murders are rather anaesthetised - as was right for 50 years ago. But we will see the results of the murders on stage. Kevin has brought it home that these people are being murdered." Agatha Christie's grandson Matthew Prichard, who heads her Estate, says: "If Agatha Christie is to be as popular as the 21st century as she was in the 20th, we have to be open-minded about interpreting stories in modern ways, much as Shakspeare is reinvented for successive generations."

Note: This production is suitable for all, at parent's discretion, but please remember it is a thriller!

The cast featured Anthony Howell as 'Captain Philip Lombard', Sam Crane as 'Anthony Marston', David Ross as 'Albert Blore', Graham Crowden as 'General MacArthur', Richard Johnson as 'Justice Wargrave', Richard Clothier as 'Dr Edward Armstrong', Tara Fitzgerald as 'Vera Claythorne', Gemma Jones as 'Emily Brent', John Ramm as 'Rogers', and Katy Brittain as 'Mrs Rogers'.

Directed by Steven Pimlott, with designs by Mark Thompson, music by Jason Carr, and sound by Gregory Clarke.

Graham Crowden's London theatre credits include playing the roles of 'Chebutikin' in Robert Sturua's revival of Anton Chekhov's The Three Sisters at the Queen's Theatre in 1990; 'Casino Proprietor'/'Vincent Crummles' in John Caird and Trevor Nunn's production of David Edgar's stage adaptation of Charles Dickens' The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby at the Aldwych Theatre in 1980; 'Archie' in Peter Wood's production of Tom Stoppard's Jumpers at the Old Vic Theatre in 1972; 'Prospero' in Jonathan Miller's revival of William Shakespeare's The Tempest at the Mermaid Theatre in 1970; 'Pantaloon' in Toby Robertson's revival of Carlo Goldoni's The Servant of Two Master at the Queen's Theatre in 1968; 'The Player King' in Derek Goldby's revival of Tom Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead at the Old Vic Theatre in 1967; 'Sergei Voinitsev' in George Devine's production of Anton Chekhov's Platonov at the Royal Court Theatre in 1960; and 'Mr Praed' in David Horne's revival of George Bernard Shaw's Mrs Warren's Profession at the Theatre Royal Stratford East in 1947.

Richard Johnson's London theatre credits include playing the roles of 'Sir George Crofts' in Peter Hall's revival of George Bernard Shaw's Mrs Warren's Profession at the Strand Theatre in 2002; 'Dorn' in Adrian Noble's revival of Anton Chekhov's The Seagull at the Barbican Theatre in 2000; 'Sir Leonard Darwin' in Jonathan Kent's revival of David Hare's Plenty at the Albery Theatre in 1999; 'Aleksandr Vladimirovich Serebryakov' in Bill Bryden's revival of Anton Chekov's Uncle Vanya at the Albery Theatre in 1996; 'James Tyrone' in Laurence Boswell's revival of Eugene O'Neill's Long Day's Journey Into Night at the Young Vic Theatre in 1996; 'Mark Antony' in John Caird's revival of William Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra at the Barbican Theatre in 1993; 'Nandor' in Peter Wood's revival of Ferenc Molnar's The Guardsman at the National Theatre's Lyttelton Theatre in 1977; 'Charles Condomine' in Harold Pinter's revival of Noel Coward's Blithe Spirit at the National Theatre's Lyttleton Theatre in 1976; and 'Ferdinand' in Peter Brook's revival of William Shakespeare's The Tempest at the Theatre Royal Drury Lane in 1957.

Gemma Jones' London theatre credits include playing the roles of 'Big Mama' in Anthony Page's revival of Tennessee Williams' Cat on a Hot Tin Roof at the Lyric Theatre in 2001; 'Sonya Tolstoy' in Jack Hofsiss' production of James Goldman's Tolstoy at the Aldwych Theatre in 1996; 'Goneril' in Jonathan Miller's revival of William Shakespeare's King Lear at the Old Vic Theatre in 1989; and 'Ruth' in Kevin Billington's revival of Harold Pinter's The Homecoming at the Garrick Theatre in 1978.

"Steven Pimlott is having a laugh with his successful revival at the Gielgud of Agatha Christie's And Then There Were None. This production is to the classic English whodunit what Scream is to teen slasher flicks. The audience gets to enjoy the comfort-food feeling of curling up with a creaky old crime novel, but washed down with glass after glass of irony on the rocks... Mark Thompson's designs are stunning... There may be a point here about facing your demons, but it's not the point. Pure pleasure is." The Sunday Telegraph

"If Agatha Christie reminds you of parma violets, then Kevin Elyot's adaptation will startle you like a gunshot. Ten people visit Soldier Island to meet the mysterious UN Owen... Steven Pimlott's production places them in a horror-film context. The sense of dread is turned up as high as Gregory Clarke's creepy sound effects, and Mark Thompson's wonderful art-deco sets... Tell The Mousetrap there is a new killer in town." The Sunday Times

"There are some unexpected additions in Kevin Elyot's rewrite of Agatha Christie's ancient whodunit And Then There Were None: sickeningly realistic projectile vomit and a bit of bonking on the beach after which the damsel awakes soaked in blood - and it isn't her own. Not quite Miss Christie's style, but it livens things up a bit. Indeed, Steven Pimlott's sluggish production could have done with much more Theatre Of Blood-style hammy Hammer horror. All too late, he switches on the thunder and lightning, the squeal of seagulls and a body in a closet in full judge's regalia... Pimlott serves up a flabby morality play in which ten people who have nothing in common but the fact that they are all murderers (directly or indirectly) are gathered together and then given their just deserts one by one in accordance with the nursery rhyme about ten little soldier boys. And he does so with such painful lack of pace that I swear you can hear the plot creaking. Tara Fitzgerald acquits herself well as the lissome games mistress; the rest of the cast are seriously guilty of mediocre performances. They deserve their grisly ends; pity we had to wait so long." The Mail on Sunday

"Kevin Elyot's new version of a real Christie story musters no more tension than a busted elastic band, despite an accomplished cast and a series of murders accompanied by thunderclaps and shrieking seagulls. Ten strangers lured to a remote island rapidly decrease in number as one of them, a crazed killer, gets busy with poison, gun and axe. Tara Fitzgerald, Richard Johnson and the rest keep fairly straight faces while delivering substandard hokum. Who dunnit? Who cares?" The Sun

And Then There Were None in London at the Gielgud Theatre previewed from 14 October 2005, opened on 25 October 2005, and closed 14 January 2006.