Uncle Vanya

Harold Pinter Theatre
Panton Street, London

Public Previews: 14 January 2020
Opens: 23 January 2020
Closes: 2 May 2020

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Nearest Tube: Piccadilly Circus

Location Map: Street map

Show times
Monday at 7.30pm
Tuesday at 7.30pm
Wednesday at 2.30pm and 7.30pm
Thursday at 7.30pm
Friday at 7.30pm
Saturday at 2.30pm and 7.30pm
Sunday no shows

Note:
Wed 15 Jan at 7.30pm only
Thu 23 Jan at 7.00pm only

Runs ? hours and ? minutes

Seat prices
? to ? (plus booking fees if applicable)

Uncle Vanya

A major revival of Anton Chekov's Uncle Vanya in London starring Toby Jones and Richard Armitage

Vanya, Yelena, Astrov and Sonya are all in love, with the past, with ideals and with each other. As their universe shifts around them they struggle to keep their emotions at bay in this exquisitely evoked comedy of the trials and tribulations of the human condition.

Presented in a new adaption by Conor McPherson.

The cast features Toby Jones as 'Uncle Vanya' and Richard Armitage as 'Astrov', with Aimee Lou Wood as 'Sonya', Ciaran Hinds as 'Professor Serebryakov', Rosalind Eleazar as 'Yelena', Peter Wight as 'Telegin', Anna Calder-Marshall as 'Nana', and Dearbhla Molloy as 'Grandmaman'. Directed by Ian Rickson with designs by Rae Smith, lighting by Bruno Poet, music by Stephen Warbeck, and sound by Ian Dickinson.

Toby Jones' London theatre credits include playing the roles of 'Stanley' in Ian Rickson's revival of Harold Pinter's The Birthday Party at the Harold Pinter Theatre in 2018; and 'Lucio' in Simon McBurney's revival of Shakespeare's Measure for Measure at the National Theatre's Olivier Theatre in 2004.

Richard Armitage's West End theatre credits include playing the role of 'John Proctor' in Yael Farber's revival of Arthur Miller's The Crucible at the Old Vic Theatre in 2014.

Ciaran Hinds London stage credits include the roles of 'Nick Laine' in Conor McPherson's production of his own play Girl From the North Country at the Old Vic Theatre and Noel Coward Theatre in 2017; and 'Captain Jack Boyle' in Howard Davies' revival of Sean O'Casey's Juno and the Paycock at the National Theatre Lyttelton Theatre in 2011.

Dearbhla Molloy's London theatre credits include the roles of 'Aunt Pat Carney' in Sam Mendes' production of Jez Butterworth's The Ferryman at the Royal Court Theatre and Gielgud Theatre in 2017; 'Mrs Shaw' in Anna Mackmin's revival of David Storey's In Celebration at the Duke of York's Theatre in 2007; 'Juno Boyle' in John Crowley's revival of Sean O'Casey's Juno and the Paycock at the Donmar Warehouse in 1999; 'Nurse Fay' in Peter James' revival of Joe Orton's Loot at the Lyric Theatre Hammersmith in 1992; 'Audrey' in Geraldine McEwan's revival of Shakespeare's As You Like It at the Phoenix Theatre in 1988; and 'Mary Boyle' in Trevor Nunn's revival of Sean O'Casey's Juno and the Paycock at the Aldwych Theatre 1980.

Anton Chekhov's plays include The Wood Demon, The Three Sisters, The Cherry Orchard, The Seagull and Ivanov

Uncle Vanya in London at the Harold Pinter Theatre public previews from 14 January 2020, opens on 23 January 2020, and closes on 2 May 2020


1914 West End London Premiere with Guy Rathbone

London Revival 1921 with Leon Quartermaine

1st West End London Revival 1926 with Robert Farquharson

2nd West End London Revival 1928 in Russian - Moscow Art Theatre Company

London Revival 1937 with Harcourt Williams

London Revival 1943 with Harold Scott

3rd West End London Revival 1945 with Ralph Richardson, Laurence Olivier and Sybil Thorndike

London Revival 1952 with Cyril Luckman

London Revival 1958 in Russian - Moscow Art Theatre Company

4th West End London Revival 1963 with Michael Redgrave, Joan Plowright and Laurence Olivier

London Revival 1970 with Paul Scofield

London Revival 1979 with Nigel Hawthorne, Alison Steadman and Ian Holm

London Revival 1982 with Michael Bryant

5th West End London Revival 1982 with Donald Sinden, Shelia Gish and Frances de la Tour

6th West End London Revival 1988 with Michael Gambon, Greta Scacchi, Imelda Staunton, and Jonathan Pryce

London Revival 1989 in Russian - Moscow Art Theatre

London Revival 1991 with Richard Briers

London Revival 1992 with Ian McKellen and Antony Sher

London Revival 1995 with Stephen Rea

7th West End London Revival 1996 with Derek Jacobi

London Revival 1998 with Stephen Dillane

London Revival 2002 with Simon Russell Beale

London Revival 2005 in Russian - Maly Drama Theatre of St Petersburg

8th West End London Revival 2012 with Ken Stott

9th West End London Revival 2012 in Russian - Vakhtangov Theatre Company

10th West End London Revival 2014 in Russian - Mossovet State Academic Theatre

London Revival 2016 with Paul Rhys


1914 West End London Premiere with Guy Rathbone

Opened 10 May 1914, Closed 11 May 1914 at the Aldwych Theatre

Translated by Mrs R S Townsend.

The cast featured Guy Rathbone as 'Ivan Petrovich Voynitsky (Uncle Vanya)', Harry Reginald Hignett as 'Aleksandr Vladimirovich Serebryakov', Ernita Lascelles as 'Helena Andreyevna Serebryakova (Yelena)', Gillian Scaife as 'Sofia Alexandrovna Serebryakova (Sonya)', and Herbert Grimwood as 'Mikhail Lvovich Astrov'.

Directed by Guy Rathbone.

Presented by the Stage Society for two performances only.


London Revival 1921 with Leon Quartermaine

Opened 27 November 1921, Closed 28 November 1921 at the Court Theatre (now Royal Court Theatre)

Translated by Constance Garnett.

The cast featured Leon Quartermaine as 'Ivan Petrovich Voynitsky (Uncle Vanya)', Harry Reginald Hignett as 'Aleksandr Vladimirovich Serebryakov', Cathleen Nesbitt as 'Helena Andreyevna Serebryakova (Yelena)', Irene Rathbone as 'Sofia Alexandrovna Serebryakova (Sonya)', and Franklin Dyall as 'Mikhail Lvovich Astrov'.

Directed by Theodore Komisarjevsky.

Presented by the Stage Society.


1st West End London Revival 1926 with Robert Farquharson

Opened 15 February 1926, Closed 13 March 1926 at the Duke of York's Theatre

Translated by Constance Garrett.

The cast featured Robert Farquharson as 'Ivan Petrovich Voynitsky (Uncle Vanya)', Boris Ranevsky as 'Aleksandr Vladimirovich Serebryakov', Dorothy Massingham as 'Helena Andreyevna Serebryakova (Yelena)', Jean Forbes-Robertson as 'Sofia Alexandrovna Serebryakova (Sonya)', and Henry C Hewitt as 'Mikhail Lvovich Astrov'.

Directed by Theodore Komisarjevsky.


2nd West End London Revival 1928 in Russian - Moscow Art Theatre Company

Opened 30 April 1928, Closed 11 May 1928 (in repertory) at the Garrick Theatre

Performed in Russian.

Presented by the Moscow Art Theatre Company as part of a short season.


London Revival 1937 with Harcourt Williams

Opened 5 February 1937, Closed 6 March 1937 at the Westminster Theatre

Translated by Constance Garrett.

The cast featured Harcourt Williams as 'Ivan Petrovich Voynitsky (Uncle Vanya)', Mark Dignam as 'Aleksandr Vladimirovich Serebryakov', Lydia Sherwood as 'Helena Andreyevna Serebryakova (Yelena)', Alexis France as 'Sofia Alexandrovna Serebryakova (Sonya)', and Cecil Trouncer as 'Mikhail Lvovich Astrov'.

Directed by Michael MacOwen with designs by Peter Goffin.


London Revival 1943 with Harold Scott

Opened 2 September 1943, Closed 2 October 1943 at the Westminster Theatre

Translated by Constance Garrett.

The cast featured Harold Scott as 'Ivan Petrovich Voynitsky (Uncle Vanya)', Graveley Edwards as 'Aleksandr Vladimirovich Serebryakov', Joan Swinstead as 'Helena Andreyevna Serebryakova (Yelena)', Vivienne Bennett as 'Sofia Alexandrovna Serebryakova (Sonya)', and Frith Banbury as 'Mikhail Lvovich Astrov'.

Directed by Norman Marshall with designs by Roger Furse.


3rd West End London Revival 1945 with Ralph Richardson, Laurence Olivier and Sybil Thorndike

Opened 16 January 1945, Closed 12 April 1945 (in repertory) at the New Theatre (now Noel Coward Theatre)
Returned 13 November 1945, Closed 26 April 1946 (in repertory) at the New Theatre (now Noel Coward Theatre)

Translated by Constance Garrett.

The cast featured Ralph Richardson as 'Ivan Petrovich Voynitsky (Uncle Vanya)', Harcourt Williams as 'Aleksandr Vladimirovich Serebryakov', Margaret Leighton as 'Helena Andreyevna Serebryakova (Yelena)', Joyce Redman as 'Sofia Alexandrovna Serebryakova (Sonya)', Laurence Olivier as 'Mikhail Lvovich Astrov', Betty Hardy as 'Maria Vasilyevna Voynitskya', George Relph as 'Ilya Ilych Telegin', Sybil Thorndike as 'Marina Timofeevna', and Humphrey Heathcote as 'Yefin'.

For the return season in November 1945, Bryony Chapman ook over as 'Maria Vasilyevna Voynitskya', and William Monk took over as 'Yefin'.

Directed by John Burrell with designs by Tanya Moiseiwitsch.

Presented by the Old Vic Theatre Company.


London Revival 1952 with Cyril Luckman

Opened 27 March 1952, Closed 20 April 1952 at the Arts Theatre

Translated by JP Davis.

The cast featured Cyril Luckman as 'Ivan Petrovich Voynitsky (Uncle Vanya)', Noel Iliff as 'Aleksandr Vladimirovich Serebryakov', Helen Shingler as 'Helena Andreyevna Serebryakova (Yelena)', Jenny Laird as 'Sofia Alexandrovna Serebryakova (Sonya)', John Justin as 'Mikhail Lvovich Astrov', Madge Whiteman as 'Maria Vasilyevna Voynitskya', Jeffrey Segal as 'Ilya Ilych Telegin', Nora Nicholson as 'Marina Timofeevna', and Douglas Cornelissen as 'Yefin'.

Directed by John Fernald with designs by Ronald Brown.


London Revival 1958 in Russian - Moscow Art Theatre Company

Opened 20 May 1958, Closed 14 June 1958 (in repertory) at Sadler's Wells Theatre

Performed in Russian.

Presented by the Moscow Art Theatre Company.

Performed as part of a four-and-a-half week season, this was the first time that the Moscow Art Theatre Company had appeared outside Russian.


4th West End London Revival 1963 with Michael Redgrave, Joan Plowright and Laurence Olivier

Opened 19 November 1963, Closed 1 August 1964 (in repertory) at the Old Vic Theatre

Translated by Constance Garnett.

The cast featured Michael Redgrave as 'Ivan Petrovich Voynitsky (Uncle Vanya)', Max Adrian as 'Aleksandr Vladimirovich Serebryakov', Rosemary Harris as 'Helena Andreyevna Serebryakova (Yelena)', Joan Plowright as 'Sofia Alexandrovna Serebryakova (Sonya)', Laurence Olivier as 'Mikhail Lvovich Astrov', Enid Lorimer as 'Maria Vasilyevna Voynitskya', Keith Marsh as 'Ilya Ilych Telegin', Wynne Clark as 'Marina Timofeevna', and Robert Lang as 'Yefin'.

Directed by Laurence Olivier with sets by Sean Kenny, costumes by Beatrice Dawson, and lighting by John B Read and Leonard Tucker.

A transfer from the Chichester Festival Theatre - opened 1 July 1963, closed 31 August 1963 (in repertory) - with the same cast as at the Old Vic apart from Sybil Thorndike (Marina Timfeevna), Lewis Casson (Ilya Ilych Telyegin), and Fay Compton (Maria Vasilyevna Voynitskya).

Presented by the National Theatre.


London Revival 1970 with Paul Scofield

Previewed 20 February 1970, Opened 24 February 1970, Closed 4 April 1970 at the Royal Court Theatre

Adapted by Chistopher Hampton.

The cast featured Paul Scofield as 'Ivan Petrovich Voynitsky (Uncle Vanya)', Ralph Micheal as 'Aleksandr Vladimirovich Serebryakov', Elizabeth Bell as 'Helena Andreyevna Serebryakova (Yelena)', Anna Calder-Marshall as 'Sofia Alexandrovna Serebryakova (Sonya)', Colin Blakely as 'Mikhail Lvovich Astrov', Gwen Ffrangcon-Davies as 'Maria Vasilyevna Voynitskya', Denis Carey as 'Ilya Ilych Telegin', Madoline Thomas as 'Marina Timofeevna', and Oliver Maguire as 'Yefin'.

Directed by Anthony Page with designs by Dierdre Clancy.


London Revival 1979 with Nigel Hawthorne, Alison Steadman and Ian Holm

Previewed 22 November 1979, Opened 28 November 1979, Closed 12 January 1980 at the Hampstead Theatre

Adapted by Pam Gems.

The cast featured Nigel Hawthorne as 'Ivan Petrovich Voynitsky (Uncle Vanya)', Maurice Denham as 'Aleksandr Vladimirovich Serebryakov', Susan Little as 'Helena Andreyevna Serebryakova (Yelena)', Alison Steadman as 'Sofia Alexandrovna Serebryakova (Sonya)', Ian Holm as 'Mikhail Lvovich Astrov', Jean Anderson as 'Maria Vasilyevna Voynitskya', Anthony O'Donnell as 'Ilya Ilych Telegin', Hilda Braid as 'Marina Timofeevna', and Peter Barnes as 'Yefin'.

Directed by Nancy Meckler with sets by Alison Chitty, costumes by Lindy Hemming, and lighting by Mark Jonathan.


London Revival 1982 with Michael Bryant

Previewed 7 May 1982, Opened 18 May 1982, Closed 11 October 1982 (in repertory) at the National Theatre's Lyttelton Theatre

Adapted by Pam Gems.

The cast featured Michael Bryant as 'Ivan Petrovich Voynitsky (Uncle Vanya)', Basil Henson as 'Aleksandr Vladimirovich Serebryakov', Cherie Lunghi as 'Helena Andreyevna Serebryakova (Yelena)', Patti Love as 'Sofia Alexandrovna Serebryakova (Sonya)', Dinsdale Landen as 'Mikhail Lvovich Astrov', Madeleine Christie as 'Maria Vasilyevna Voynitskya', Daniel Thorndike as 'Ilya Ilych Telegin', Madolin Thomas as 'Marina Timofeevna', and Michael Beint as 'Yefin'.

Directed by Michael Bogdanov with designs by John Bury, lighting by Chris Ellis, and sound by Derrick Zieba.

Presented by the National Theatre.


5th West End London Revival 1982 with Donald Sinden, Shelia Gish and Frances de la Tour

Previewed 3 August 1982, Opened 5 August 1982, Closed 4 September 1982 at the Theatre Royal, Haymarket
Returned 27 September 1982, Closed 9 October 1982 at the Theatre Royal, Haymarket
Returned 1 November 1982, Closed 13 November 1982 at the Theatre Royal, Haymarket

Translated by John Murrell.

The cast featured Donald Sinden as 'Ivan Petrovich Voynitsky (Uncle Vanya)', Harry Andrews as 'Aleksandr Vladimirovich Serebryakov', Shelia Gish as 'Helena Andreyevna Serebryakova (Yelena)', Frances de la Tour as 'Sofia Alexandrovna Serebryakova (Sonya)', Ronald Pickup as 'Mikhail Lvovich Astrov', Margaret Rawlings as 'Maria Vasilyevna Voynitskya', Bill Fraser as 'Ilya Ilych Telegin', Freda Jackson as 'Marina Timofeevna', and Bernard Martin as 'Yefin', with Terrie Fender, Norah McCall and Lee Peters.

Directed by Christopher Fettes with sets by Daphne Dare, costumes by Ann Curtis, lighting by Mark Pritchard, and music by Christopher Hobbs.

This production alternated 'straight-runs' at the Haymarket Theatre with The Rules of the Game, by Luigi Pirandello, starring Leonard Rossiter, the two productions hd entirely different casts.


6th West End London Revival 1988 with Michael Gambon, Greta Scacchi, Imelda Staunton, and Jonathan Pryce

Previewed 12 May 1988, Opened 24 May 1988, Closed 12 November 1988 at the Vaudeville Theatre

Translated by Michael Frayn.

The cast featured Michael Gambon as 'Ivan Petrovich Voynitsky (Uncle Vanya)', Benjamin Whitrow as 'Aleksandr Vladimirovich Serebryakov', Greta Scacchi as 'Helena Andreyevna Serebryakova (Yelena)', Imelda Staunton as 'Sofia Alexandrovna Serebryakova (Sonya)', Jonathan Pryce as 'Mikhail Lvovich Astrov', Rachel Kempson as 'Maria Vasilyevna Voynitskya', Jonathan Cecil as 'Ilya Ilych Telegin', Elizabeth Bradley as 'Marina Timofeevna', and Tom Hardy as 'Yefin', with Peter Honri.

Directed by Michael Blakemore with designs by Tanya McCallin, and lighting by Mich Hughes.


London Revival 1989 in Russian - Moscow Art Theatre

Opened 14 September 1989, Closed 16 September 1989 at the National Theatre's Lyttelton Theatre

Performed in Russian.

Presented by the Moscow Art Theatre.


London Revival 1991 with Richard Briers

Previewed 12 August 1991, Opens 14 August 1991, Closed 31 August 1991 at the Lyric Theatre, Hammersmith

Translated by Pam Gems.

The cast featured Richard Briers as 'Ivan Petrovich Voynitsky (Uncle Vanya)', Patrick Godley as 'Aleksandr Vladimirovich Serebryakov', Sian Thomas as 'Helena Andreyevna Serebryakova (Yelena)', Annabel Arden as 'Sofia Alexandrovna Serebryakova (Sonya)', Peter Egan as 'Mikhail Lvovich Astrov', Olga Lowe as 'Maria Vasilyevna Voynitskya', Jimmy Yuill as 'Ilya Ilych Telegin', Stella Moray as 'Marina Timofeevna', and Alex Lowe as 'Yefin', with Helen Goldwyn and Robin Lloyd.

Directed by Peter Egan and Kenneth Branagh, with designs by Kenny Miller, lighting by Rick Fisher, and music by Jimmy Yuill.

Presented by the Renaissance Theatre Company.


London Revival 1992 with Ian McKellen and Antony Sher

Previewed 20 February 1992, Opened 25 February 1992, Closed 9 May 1992 (in repertory) at the National Theatre's Cotesloe Theatre

Translated by Pam Gems.

The cast featured Ian McKellen as 'Ivan Petrovich Voynitsky (Uncle Vanya)', Eric Porter as 'Aleksandr Vladimirovich Serebryakov', Janet McTeer as 'Helena Andreyevna Serebryakova (Yelena)', Lesley Sharp as 'Sofia Alexandrovna Serebryakova (Sonya)', Antony Sher as 'Mikhail Lvovich Astrov', Rachel Gurney as 'Maria Vasilyevna Voynitskya', Karl Johnson as 'Ilya Ilych Telegin', Antonia Pemberton as 'Marina Timofeevna', and Barry Stearn as 'Yefin', with Paul McGrane.

Directed by Sean Mathias with choreography by Jane Gibson, designs by Stephen Brimson Lewis, lighting by Ben Ormeod, music by Karl Johnson, and sound by Freya Edwards.


London Revival 1995 with Stephen Rea

Previewed 6 April 1995, Opened 10 April 1995, Closed 29 April 1995 at the Tricycle Theatre (now Kiln Theatre)

Translated by Frank McGuinness.

The cast featured Stephen Rea as 'Ivan Petrovich Voynitsky (Uncle Vanya)', Denys Hawthorne as 'Aleksandr Vladimirovich Serebryakov', Kim Thomson as 'Helena Andreyevna Serebryakova (Yelena)', Zara Turner as 'Sofia Alexandrovna Serebryakova (Sonya)', Enda Oates as 'Mikhail Lvovich Astrov', Pauline Delany as 'Maria Vasilyevna Voynitskya', P G Stephens as 'Ilya Ilych Telegin', Helena Carroll as 'Marina Timofeevna', and Gerald Lee as 'Yefin', with Laura Fry and Phil Henry.

Directed by Peter Gill with sets by Hayden Griffin, costumes by Pamela Howard, lighting by Andy Phillips, and music by Terry Davies.

Presented by the Field Day Theatre Group.


7th West End London Revival 1996 with Derek Jacobi

Opened 17 September 1996, Closed 16 November 1996 at the Albery Theatre (now Noel Coward Theatre)

Translated by Mike Poulton.

The cast featured Derek Jacobi as 'Ivan Petrovich Voynitsky (Uncle Vanya)', Richard Johnson as 'Aleksandr Vladimirovich Serebryakov', Imogen Stubbs as 'Helena Andreyevna Serebryakova (Yelena)', Frances Barber as 'Sofia Alexandrovna Serebryakova (Sonya)', Trevor Eve as 'Mikhail Lvovich Astrov', Constance Cummings as 'Maria Vasilyevna Voynitskya', John Normington as 'Ilya Ilych Telegin', Peggy Mount as 'Marina Timofeevna', and Michael Tomlinson as 'Yefin', with David Weston.

Directed by Bill Bryden with designs by Hayden Griffin, lighting by Andy Phillips, music by John Tams, and sound by John Leonard.

A transfer from the Minerva Theatre, Chichester - previewed 3 July 1996, opened 5 July 1996, closed 27 July 1996 - with the same cast, except for Alec McCowen who played the role of 'Aleksandr Vladimirovich Serebryakov'.


London Revival 1998 with Stephen Dillane

Previewed 25 March 1998, Opened 1 April 1998, Closed 2 May 1998 (in repertory) at the Young Vic Theatre

Translated by David Lan.

The cast featured Stephen Dillane as 'Ivan Petrovich Voynitsky (Uncle Vanya)', Malcolm Sinclair as 'Aleksandr Vladimirovich Serebryakov', Anastasia Hille as 'Helena Andreyevna Serebryakova (Yelena)', Jo McInnes as 'Sofia Alexandrovna Serebryakova (Sonya)', Linus Roache as 'Mikhail Lvovich Astrov', Cherry Morris as 'Maria Vasilyevna Voynitskya', Tom Bowles as 'Ilya Ilych Telegin', Antonia Pemberton as 'Marina Timofeevna', and Orlando Seale as 'Yefin'.

Directed by Katie Mitchell with designs by Vicki Mortimer, lighting by Paule Constable, and sound by Steff Langley.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


London Revival 2002 with Simon Russell Beale

Previewed 6 September 2002, Opened 17 September 2002, Closed 20 November 2002 (in repertory) at the Donmar Warehouse

Adapted by Brian Friel.

The cast featured Simon Russell Beale as 'Ivan Petrovich Voynitsky (Uncle Vanya)', David Bradley as 'Aleksandr Vladimirovich Serebryakov', Helen McCrory as 'Helena Andreyevna Serebryakova (Yelena)', Emily Watson as 'Sofia Alexandrovna Serebryakova (Sonya)', Mark Strong as 'Mikhail Lvovich Astrov', Selina Cadell as 'Maria Vasilyevna Voynitskya', Anthony O'Donnell as 'Ilya Ilych Telegin', Cherry Morris as 'Marina Timofeevna', and Luke Jardine as 'Yefin', with Gyuri Sarossy.

Directed by Sam Mendes with sets by Anthony Ward, costumes by Mark Thompson, lighting by Hugh Vanstone, music by George Stiles, and sound by Paul Arditti.

Performed in repertory with Twelfth Night, these two '10 Year Anniversary' productions - marking the first 10 years of the current Donmar Warehouse - where also Sam Mendes' last productions as the 'Artistic Director' of the Donmar Warehouse.


London Revival 2005 in Russian - Maly Drama Theatre of St Petersburg

Opened 24 May 2005, Closed 28 May 2005 at the Barbican Theatre

Performed in Russian.

Presented by the Maly Drama Theatre of St Petersburg.


8th West End London Revival 2012 with Ken Stott

Previewed 24 October 2012,Opened 2 November 2012, Closed 26 January 2013 at the Vaudeville Theatre

Adapted by Christopher Hampton.

The cast featured Ken Stott as 'Ivan Petrovich Voynitsky (Uncle Vanya)', Paul Freeman as 'Aleksandr Vladimirovich Serebryakov', Anna Friel as 'Helena Andreyevna Serebryakova (Yelena)', Laura Carmichael as 'Sofia Alexandrovna Serebryakova (Sonya)', Samuel West as 'Mikhail Lvovich Astrov', Anna Carteret as 'Maria Vasilyevna Voynitskya', Mark Hadfield as 'Ilya Ilych Telegin', June Watson as 'Marina Timofeevna', and David Bannerman as 'Yefin', with Anthony Gabriel.

Directed by Lindsay Posner with designs by Christoher Oram, lighting by Paul Pyant, music by Stephen Warbeck, and sound by Gareth Owen.

"Good for Lindsay Posner, the director of this pitch-perfect production, for not choosing a big-star name to play the title role, but a proper, solid stage actor in Ken Stott. He specialises in lugubrious characters and there's a lot of that doomed comedian in his Vanya. Vanya has the thankless task of running the estate of his brother-in-law, Serebryakov, an ageing, pompous professor who's played with aplomb by Paul Freeman... In the play's dramatic high point, Vanya shoots Serebryakov and misses. Tragic but also funny, it is a scene that is as Hancockian as it is Chekhovian in Stott's hands. He is a member of a fine ensemble... the acting honours go, however, to Laura Carmichael as Sonya, Vanya's plain niece... If you are into depressing plays, this production is, paradoxically, an unalloyed joy." The Sunday Telegraph

"Laura Carmichael's plaintive, plain Sonya is one of the strengths of Lindsay Posner's exceptionally starry but disappointingly lacklustre revival. Her blushing joy when she dares to say how much she loves Astrov is wretchedly moving. Few of the other performances have sufficient intensity either to pierce or amuse, though Samuel West cuts a dash as Astrov, dapper and idealistic but emotionally shrivelled... Stott captures Vanya's grumpiness and frustration, but he's neither as ridiculous nor as sympathetic as he might be. Christopher Hampton's witty version has its moments... but Posner's very traditional, stuffy approach is slowed by lengthy scene changes, when one over-exquisitely aged and distressed setting in the wooden dacha is replaced by another rather similar one... This production is perfectly competent but never makes one see or hear the play afresh." The Mail on Sunday

Uncle Vanya in London at the Vaudeville Theatre previewed from 24 October 2012, opened on 2 November 2012 and closes on 26 January 2013 (was originally scheduled to close on 16 February 2013).


9th West End London Revival 2012 in Russian - Vakhtangov Theatre Company

Opened 5 November 2012, Closed 10 November 2012 at the Noel Coward Theatre

Performed in Russian.

The Russian theatre company Vakhtangov presents Chekhov's Uncle Vanya in London for a strictly limited one week season.

In Vakhtangov's production of Uncle Vanya there is no Chekhovian mansion, no cosy arm-chairs and no table laid for lunch with a lacy tablecloth and hot samovar; no feeling of 'home' where several generations have lived. Instead the stage has been released from the familiar and the domestic, leaving behind a battlefield of passions, broken illusions and unrealized hopes. Daily life turns imperceptibly into poetry, the drama acquires a tinge of tender irony and every detail on the stage arouses the audience's emotions.

The cast for Vakhtangov's Uncle Vanya in London features Sergey Makovetsky, Vladimir Simonov, Ludmila Maksakova, Vladimir Vdovichenkov and Galina Konovalova. The production is directed by Rimas Tuminas with designs by Adomas Yatsovskis and music by Faustas Latenas. PLEASE NOTE: This play Performed in Russian with English subtitles. This productions comes to the Noel Coward Theatre following the successful 2011 season at the theatre by the Sovremennik who presented Russian language versions of Eugenia Ginzburg's Into The Whirlwind and Anton Chekov's Three Sisters and The Cherry Orchard.

"Vakhtangov's director, Rimas Tuminas, creates a surreal, Beckett-like atmosphere in which the action is wildly inventive - even the chickens go mad. Beneath it all, though, there is a wonderful physicality about the Russian actors, especially Sergey Makovetsky's bumbling Vanya." The Sunday Times

"The Vakhtangov production looks and feels radically different... The central element of Adomas Yatsovskis' set is a large, brutal workbench on which the characters' emotional dilemmas are, sometimes literally, hammered out... Every character is constantly self-dramatising his or her assorted distresses. Vladimir Simonov's Serebryakov is so vigorous in his nocturnal illness that he resembles the late madcap Kenneth Mars. The departure of all visitors in the fourth and final act is what finally drains off this histrionic energy, leaving Sergey Makovetsky's Vanya so inert that he is posed and moved by Sonya like a mannequin." The Financial Times

"This mercurially brilliant import from Moscow's Vakhtangov theatre. British Chekhov tends to offer variations on the realism of Stanislavski. This dazzling production by Rimas Tuminas is in a wholly different tradition: that of the Russian director Meyerhold, who evolved a system of acting based on sports, acrobatics and clownish grotesquerie... The joy of the production lies in its total-theatre mix of words, music, mime and symbolism. Anna Dubrovskaya's Elena, stunning in white silk, bowls a circus hoop. Astrov shows her his images of deforestation on a projector with an unmistakably phallic funnel that emits puffs of steam. And there is an extraordinary moment at the end when Sonya ministers to Vanya, beautifully played by Sergey Makovetsky, as if he were a run-down machine that she had to lovingly reassemble. Anyone who saw the Vakhtangov when they brought Measure for Measure to Shakespeare's Globe this summer will know they are a first-rate troupe. Although this isn't the only way to play Uncle Vanya, their Chekhov has an unforgettable expressionist audacity." The Guardian

"There's a blackly ebullient abandon to their extraordinary account of Chekhov's great tragicomedy of wasted potential and blighted dreams. Out go the samovars, the birch trees and the Stanislavskian realism. In come a kind of Expressionist slapstick that's calculated to show how listless despair and manic hilarity can be flip-sides of the same coin and a sparsely junky, non-naturalistic design. The thwarted energies of the characters erupt in startling outbursts, such as when Sergei Makovetsky's crumpled, dumpy Vanya shakes off a fit of the blues by taking Maria Berdinskikh's waif-like but determined Sonya for a mad, victory-saluting ride round the stage on an iron plough. Mood swings are underlined by sardonically bathetic shifts of register in Faustas Latenas's continuous brooding-to-puckish musical soundtrack." The Independent

Uncle Vanya in London at the Noel Coward Theatre from 5 to 10 November 2012.


10th West End London Revival 2014 in Russian - Mossovet State Academic Theatre

Previewed 23 April 2014, Opened 24 April 2014, Closed 3 May 2014 (in repertory) at the Noel Coward Theatre

Performed in Russian.

Presented by the Mossovet State Academic Theatre in repertory with Three Sisters.

The Mossovet State Academic Theatre is one of the oldest theatres in Moscow having been founded in 1923. The director Andrei Konchalovsky says: "I am delighted to bringing these two Russian productions to London's West End. No matter how many times you appeal to Chekhov, he is inexhaustible. Every time his work is seen on stage, you find something unnoticed, unexperienced and undiscovered."


London Revival 2016 with Paul Rhys

Previewed 5 February 2016, Opened 12 February 2016, Closed 26 March 2016 at the Almedia Theatre

Adapted by Robert Icke.

The cast featured Paul Rhys as 'John' (Ivan Petrovich Voynitsky 'Uncle Vanya'), Hilton McRae as 'Alexander' (Aleksandr Vladimirovich Serebryakov), Vanessa Kirby as 'Elena' (Helena Andreyevna Serebryakova 'Yelena'), Jessica Brown Findlay as 'Sonya' (Sofia Alexandrovna Serebryakova 'Sonya')0, Tobias Menzies as 'Michael' (Mikhail Lvovich Astrov), Susan Wooldridge as 'Maria' (Maria Vasilyevna Voynitskya), Richard Lumsden as 'Cartwright' (Ilya Ilych Telegin), and Ann Queensberry as 'Nanny' (Marina Timofeevna).

Directed by Robert Icke with designs by Hildegard Bechtler, costumes by Jessica Curtis, lighting by Jackie Shemesh, and sound by Ian Dickinson.

The character's names in this production where anglicised, as above.