The Taming of the Shrew

Barbican Theatre
Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London

Public Previews: 5 November 2019
Opens: 7 November 2019
Closes: 18 January 2020

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Show times
Sat 26 Oct at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Sun 27 Oct no performances

Mon 28 Oct at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Tue 29 Oct at 7.00pm - As You Like It
Wed 30 Oct at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Thu 31 Oct at 1.15pm - As You Like It
Thu 31 Oct at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Fri 1 Nov at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Sat 2 Nov at 1.15pm - As You Like It
Sat 2 Nov at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Sun 3 Nov no performances

Mon 4 Nov no performances
Tue 5 Nov at 7.15pm - The Taming of the Shrew
Wed 6 Nov at 7.15pm - The Taming of the Shrew
Thu 7 Nov at 7.00pm - The Taming of the Shrew
Fri 8 Nov at 7.15pm - The Taming of the Shrew
Sat 9 Nov at 1.15pm - The Taming of the Shrew
Sat 9 Nov at 7.15pm - The Taming of the Shrew
Sun 10 Nov no performances

Mon 11 Nov no performances
Tue 12 Nov at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Wed 13 Nov at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Thu 14 Nov at 7.00pm - Measure for Measure
Fri 15 Nov at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Sat 16 Nov at 1.15pm - Measure for Measure
Sat 16 Nov at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Sun 17 Nov no performances

Mon 18 Nov at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Tue 19 Nov at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Wed 20 Nov at 7.15pm - The Taming of the Shrew
Thu 21 Nov at 1.15pm - The Taming of the Shrew
Thu 21 Nov at 7.15pm - The Taming of the Shrew
Fri 22 Nov at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Sat 23 Nov at 1.15pm - As You Like It
Sat 23 Nov at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Sun 24 Nov no performances

Mon 25 Nov no performances
Tue 26 Nov at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Wed 27 Nov at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Thu 28 Nov at 1.15pm - Measure for Measure
Thu 28 Nov at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Fri 29 Nov at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Sat 30 Nov at 1.15pm - The Taming of the Shrew
Sat 21 Dec at 1.15pm - Measure for Measure
Sat 21 Dec at 7.15pm - The Taming of the Shrew
Sun 22 Dec no performances

Mon 23 Dec at 1.15pm - The Taming of the Shrew
Mon 23 Dec at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Tue 24 Dec no performances
Wed 25 Dec no performances
Thu 26 Dec no performances
Fri 27 Dec at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Sat 28 Dec at 1.15pm - As You Like It
Sat 28 Dec at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Sun 29 Dec no performances

Mon 30 Dec at 1.15pm - Measure for Measure
Mon 30 Dec at 7.15pm - The Taming of the Shrew
Tue 31 Dec at 1.15pm - The Taming of the Shrew
Wed 1 Jan no performances
Thu 2 Jan at 1.15pm - The Taming of the Shrew
Thu 2 Jan at 7.15pm - The Taming of the Shrew
Fri 3 Jan at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Sat 4 Jan at 1.15pm - As You Like It
Sat 4 Jan at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Sun 5 Jan no performances

Mon 6 Jan at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Tue 7 Jan at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Wed 8 Jan at 1.15pm - Measure for Measure
Wed 8 Jan at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Thu 9 Jan at 1.15pm - Measure for Measure
Thu 9 Jan at 7.15pm - The Taming of the Shrew
Fri 10 Jan at 7.15pm - The Taming of the Shrew
Sat 11 Jan at 1.15pm - Measure for Measure
Sat 11 Jan at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Sun 12 Jan no performances

Mon 13 Jan at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Tue 14 Jan at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Wed 15 Jan at 1.15pm - As You Like It
Wed 15 Jan at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Thu 16 Jan at 1.15pm - As You Like It
Thu 16 Jan at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Fri 17 Jan at 7.15pm - The Taming of the Shrew
Sat 18 Jan at 1.15pm - The Taming of the Shrew
Sat 18 Jan at 7.15pm - As You Like It

Runs ? hours and ? minutes

Seat prices
? to ?
(plus booking fees if applicable)

The Taming of the Shrew

The Royal Shakespeare Company present a major revival of Shakespeare's play The Taming of the Shrew in London for a strictly limited season at the Barbican Theatre

In a reimagined 1590, England is a matriarchy. Baptista is seeking to sell off her son Katherine to the highest bidder. Cue an explosive battle of the sexes in this electrically charged love story in a production that turns Shakespeare's fierce, energetic comedy of gender and materialism on its head to offer a fresh perspective on its portrayal of hierarchy and power.

The cast features Claire Price as 'Petruchia', Joseph Arkley as 'Katherine', Amanda Harris as 'Baptista', James Cooney as 'Bianco', Laura Elsworthy as 'Trania', Emily Johnstone as 'Lucentia', and Amelia Donkor as 'Hortensia', with Charlotte Arrowsmith as 'Curtis', Hannah Azuonye as 'Pedant', Melody Brown as 'Vincentia', Richard Clews as 'Grumio', Alex Jones as 'Haberdasher', Alexander Mushore as 'Servant', Michael Patrick as 'Tailor', Sophie Stanton as 'Gremia', Aaron Thiara as 'Servant of Petruchia', Amy Trigg as 'Biondella', and Leo Wan as 'Widower'.

Directed by Justin Audibert with movement by Lucy Cullingford, sets by Stephen Brimson Lewis, costumes by Hannah Clark, lighting by Matt Peel, music by Ruth Chan, and sound by Claire Windsor.

This production transfers to London following a season in Stratford-upon-Avon at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre (previewed from 8 March 2019, opened on 19 March 2019, and closed on 31 August 2019).

Claire Price's London stage credits include the role of 'Roxane' in Howard Davies' revival of Edmond Rostand's Cyrano de Bergerac at the National Theatre's Olivier Theatre in 2004; and 'Agnes' in Andrian Noble's revival of Henrik Ibsen's Brand at the Haymarket Theatre in 2003.

Amanda Harris' West End stage credits include the roles of 'Titania' in Gregory Doran's revival of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, for the Royal Shakespeare Company, at the Novello Theatre in 2006; 'Emilia' in Gregory Doran's revival of Shakespeare's Othello, for the RSC, at the Trafalgar Studios in 2004; and 'Cecily Carruthers' in Adrian Noble revival of Tom Stoppard's Travesties at the Savoy Theatre in 1994.

Emily Johnstone's West End theatre credits inlude the role of 'Ada' in Jonathan Church's revival of Harold Brighouse's comedy Hobson's Choice at the Vaudeville Theatre in 2016.

The RSC The Taming of the Shrew in London at the Barbican Theatre public previews from 5 November 2019, opens on 7 November 2019, and closes on 18 January 2020 (in repertory)


1928 London Revival with Ralph Richardson and Laurence Olivier

1931 West End London Revival with Ralph Richardson and Phyllis Thomas

1932 West End London Revival with Russell Thorndike, Eileen Thorndike and Mary Casson

1935 London Revival with Maurice Evans and Cathleen Nesbitt

1937 West End London Revival with Leslie Banks and Edith Evans

1939 West End London Revival with Roger Livesey and Ursula Jeans

1940 West End London Revival with Donald Wolfit and Rosalinde Fuller

1941 London Revival with Patrick Kinsella and Claire Luce

1942 London Revival with George Street, Mary Martlew and Dulcie Gray

1947 West End London Revival with Trevor Howard, Patricia Burke and Bernard Miles

1950 London Revival with Anthony Eustrel, Ruth Lodge and Leslie Crowther

1954 West End London Revival with Paul Rogers, Ann Todd and Eric Porter

1958 London Revival with Bernard Brown, Cecilia Sonnenberg and Robert Atkins

1961 West End Revival with Derek Godfrey, Vanessa Redgrave and Diana Rigg

1964 London Revival with Dinsdale Landen and Shelia Ballantin

1967 West End London Revival with Michael Williams, Janet Suzman, Frances De La Tour, Patrick Stewart and Ben Kingsley

1970 London Revival with Jim Dale and Jane Lapotaire

1974 London Revival with Nicky Henson and Susan Hampshire

1975 London Revival with Jeremy Irons and Zoe Wanamaker

1977 London Revival with David Henry and Joanna McCallum

1979 West End London Revival with Jonathan Pryce, Paola Dionisotti, Zoe Wanamaker, Juliet Stevenson and David Suchet

1982 London Revival with Christopher Neame, Kate O'Mara and Douglas Hodge

1983 London Revival with Alun Armstrong, Sinead Cusack and Mark Rylance

1986 West End London Revival with Timothy Dalton and Vanessa Redgrave

1988 London revival with Brian Cox and Fiona Shaw

1993 London Revival with Geordie Johnson, Cathy Tyson and Bernard Bresslaw

1993 London Revival with Anton Lesser and Amanda Harris

1996 London Revival with Michael Siberry and Josie Lawrence

1999 London Revival with Stuart McQuarrie and Monica Dolan

2003 London Revival with Janet McTeer and Kathryn Hunter

2004 West End London Revival with Jasper Britton and Alexandra Gilbreath

2006 London Revival with John Hodgkinson, Sirine Saba and Sheridan Smith

2007 West End London Revival with Dugald Bruce-Lockhart and Simon Scardifield

2009 West End London Revival with Stephen Boxer and Michelle Gomez

2012 London Revival with Simon Paisley Day and Samantha Spiro

2013 London Revival with Leah Whitaker and Kate Lamb

2016 London Revival with Edward MacLiam and Aoife Duffin

2018 London Revival with Colm Gormley and Rhianna McGreevy


1928 London Revival with Ralph Richardson and Laurence Olivier

Opened 30 April 1928, Closed 26 May 1928 at the Court Theatre (now Royal Court Theatre)

The cast featured Scott Sunderland as 'Petruchio', Eileen Beldon as 'Katherina', Clifford Marquand as 'Baptista', Muriel Hewitt as 'Bianca', Ralph Richardson as 'Tranio', Nigel Clarke as 'Lucentio', and Ronald Simpson as 'Hortensio', with Laurence Olivier as 'Lord'.

Directed by H K Ayliff.

A modern dress production.


1931 West End London Revival with Ralph Richardson and Phyllis Thomas

Opened 13 October 1931, Closed 24 October 1931 at Sadler's Wells Theatre
Transferred 26 October 1931, Closed 31 October 1931 at the Old Vic Theatre
Returned 26 December 1931 at the Old Vic Theatre
Transferred 28 December to 1 January 1931 at Sadler's Wells Theatre

The original cast featured Ralph Richardson as 'Petruchio', Phyllis Thomas as 'Katherina', Douglas Jefferies as 'Baptista', Alice Darch as 'Bianca', Richard Riddle as 'Tranio', Robert Harris as 'Lucentio', and Grenville Eves as 'Hortensio'.

Directed by Harcourt Williams.


1932 West End London Revival with Russell Thorndike, Eileen Thorndike and Mary Casson

20 April and 28 April 1932 at the Kingsway Theatre (now demolished)

The cast featured Russell Thorndike as 'Petruchio', Eileen Thorndike as 'Katherina', Charles Vane as 'Baptista', Mary Casson as 'Bianca', Peter Dearing as 'Tranio', Duncan Yarrow as 'Lucentio', and Basil Dear as 'Hortensio'.

Two performances only as part of a two seek season of Shakespeare plays presented in repertory by the 'Ben Greet Players'.

Russell Thorndike and Eileen Thorndike where the brother and sister of Sybil Thorndike. Mary Casson was the daughter of Sybil Thorndike and her husband Lewis Casson.

The Kingsway Theatre was in Great Queen Street, Covent Garden.


1935 London Revival with Maurice Evans and Cathleen Nesbitt

Opened 1 January 1935, Closed 19 January 1935 at Sadler's Wells Theatre

The cast featured Maurice Evans as 'Petruchio', Cathleen Nesbitt as 'Katherina', Cecil Trouncer as 'Baptista', Vivienne Bennett as 'Bianca', Leo Genn as 'Tranio', Alan Webb as 'Lucentio', and Richard Warner as 'Hortensio'.

Directed by Henry Cass.


1937 West End London Revival with Leslie Banks and Edith Evans

Opened 23 March 1937, Closed 1 May 1937 at the New Theatre (now Noel Coward Theatre)

The cast featured Leslie Banks as 'Petruchio', Edith Evans as 'Katherina', George Howe as 'Baptista', Elspeth Duxbury as 'Bianca', Anthony Ireland as 'Tranio', Alec Clunes as 'Lucentio', and Ronald Simpson as 'Hortensio'.

Directed by Claud Gurney with designs by Doris Zinkeisen.


1939 West End London Revival with Roger Livesey and Ursula Jeans

Opened 28 March 1939, Closed 29 April 1939 at the Old Vic Theatre

The original cast featured Roger Livesey as 'Petruchio', Ursula Jeans as 'Katherina', Esme Percy as 'Baptista', Pamela Brown as 'Bianca', Thomas Heathcote as 'Tranio', Peter Glenville as 'Lucentio', and Frank Napier as 'Hortensio'.

Directed by Tyrone Guthrie with designs by Roger Furse.


1940 West End London Revival with Donald Wolfit and Rosalinde Fuller

6 and 9 March 1940 at the Kingsway Theatre (now demolished)

The cast featured Donald Wolfit as 'Petruchio', Rosalinde Fuller as 'Katherina', Campbell Fletcher as 'Baptista', Rosalind Iden as 'Bianca', Donald Layne-Smith as 'Tranio', Brandon Acton-Bond as 'Lucentio', and Ian Dawson as 'Hortensio'.

Directed and designed by Donald Wolfit and Andrew Leigh, with costumes by Paul Gibson.

Two performances only presented as part of a three week Donald Wolfit Shakespeare Season.

The Kingsway Theatre was in Great Queen Street, Covent Garden.


1941 London Revival with Patrick Kinsella and Claire Luce

Opened 4 August 1941, Closed 16 August 191 at the Open Air Theatre in Regent's Park

The cast featured Patrick Kinsella as 'Petruchio', Claire Luce as 'Katherina', Tristan Rawson as 'Baptista', Patricia Hicks as 'Bianca', Anthony Bazell as 'Tranio', Peter Smallwood as 'Lucentio', and Duncan Yarrow as 'Hortensio'.

Directed by Robert Atkins.


1942 London Revival with George Street, Mary Martlew and Dulcie Gray

Opened 5 August 1942, Closed 15 August 1942 at the Open Air Theatre in Regent's Park

The cast featured George Street as 'Petruchio', Mary Martlew as 'Katherina', Meadows White as 'Baptista', Dulcie Gray as 'Bianca', John Wynyard as 'Tranio', Michael Bentine as 'Lucentio', and Charles Deane as 'Hortensio'.

Directed by Robert Atkins.


1947 West End London Revival with Trevor Howard, Patricia Burke and Bernard Miles

Opened 4 November 1947, Closed 20 April 1948 (in repertory) at the New Theatre (now Noel Coward Theatre)

The cast featured Trevor Howard as 'Petruchio', Patricia Burke as 'Katherina', Mark Dignam as 'Baptista', Renee Asherson as 'Bianca', Peter Copley as 'Tranio', George Rose as 'Lucentio', and Harry Andrews as 'Hortensio', with Bernard Miles as 'Christopher Sly'.

Directed by John Burrell with sets by Kathleen Ankers, and costumes by Alix Stone and Audrey Cruddas.

Presented at the New Theatre by the Old Vic Theatre Company.


1950 London Revival with Anthony Eustrel, Ruth Lodge and Leslie Crowther

Opened 17 July 1950, Closed 19 August 1950 at the Open Air Theatre in Regent's Park

The cast featured Anthony Eustrel as 'Petruchio', Ruth Lodge as 'Katherina', Michael Godfrey as 'Baptista', Judith Stott as 'Bianca', Aubrey Woods as 'Tranio', Richard Bebb as 'Lucentio', and David Powell as 'Hortensio', with Leslie Crowther as 'Pedant' and '1st Huntsman'.

Directed by Robert Atkins.


1954 West End London Revival with Paul Rogers, Ann Todd and Eric Porter

Opened 30 November 1954, Closed 14 March 1955 (in repertory) at the Old Vic Theatre

The cast featured Paul Rogers as 'Petruchio', Ann Todd as 'Katherina', Laurence Hardy as 'Baptista', Gwen Cherrell as 'Bianca', Alan Dobie as 'Tranio', Paul Daneman as 'Lucentio', and Robert Hardy as 'Hortensio', with Eric Porter as 'Christopher Sly'.

Directed by Denis Carey with designs by Kenneth Rowell.


1958 London Revival with Bernard Brown, Cecilia Sonnenberg and Robert Atkins

Opened 23 June 1958, Closed 12 July 1958 at the Open Air Theatre in Regent's Park

The cast featured Bernard Brown as 'Petruchio', Cecilia Sonnenberg as 'Katherina', Robert Atkins as 'Baptista', Jocelyn Britton as 'Bianca', Leonard Graham as 'Tranio', Peter Barlett as 'Lucentio', and Brian Cobby as 'Hortensio'.

Directed by Leslie French.


1961 West End Revival with Derek Godfrey, Vanessa Redgrave and Diana Rigg

Opened 13 September 1961, Closed 9 December 1961 (in repertory) at the Aldwych Theatre

The cast featured Derek Godfrey as 'Petruchio', Vanessa Redgrave as 'Katharina', Patrick Wymark as 'Baptista', Diana Rigg as 'Bianca', James Bree as 'Tranio', Peter Jeffrey as 'Lucentio', and George Murcell as 'Hortensio', with Roy Dotrice as 'Christopher Sly'.

Directed by Maurice Daniels with choreography by Pauline Grant, designs by Alix Stone, lighting by John Wyckham, and music by Brian Priestman.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1964 London Revival with Dinsdale Landen and Shelia Ballantin

Opened 15 July 1964, Closed 22 August 1964 at the Open Air Theatre in Regent's Park

The cast featured Dinsdale Landen as 'Petruchio', Shelia Ballantine as 'Katherina', David King as 'Baptista', Amanda Reiss as 'Bianca', Richard Kane as 'Tranio', John Castle as 'Lucentio', and Christopher Burgess as 'Hortensio'.

Directed by Vladek Sheybal with sets by Henry Bardon, and costumes by David Walker.


1967 West End London Revival with Michael Williams, Janet Suzman, Frances De La Tour, Patrick Stewart and Ben Kingsley

Opened 3 August 1967, Closed 21 December 1967 (in repertory) at the Aldwych Theatre

The cast featured Michael Williams as 'Petruchio', Janet Suzman as 'Katharina', Roy Kinnear as 'Baptista', June Watts as 'Bianca', Charles Thomas as 'Tranio', Robert Lloyd as 'Lucentio', and Tim Wylton as 'Hortensio', with Frances De La Tour as 'Nicholas' / 'Widow', Patrick Stewart as 'Grumio', Ben Kingsley as 'Huntsman', and Roger Rees as 'Huntsman'.

Directed by Trevor Nunn with designs by Christopher Morley, lighting by John Bradley, and music by Guy Woolfenden.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1970 London Revival with Jim Dale and Jane Lapotaire

Previewed 13 November 1970, Opened 18 November 1970, Closed 25 September 1971 (in repertory) at the Young Vic Theatre

The original cast featured Jim Dale as 'Petruchio', Jane Lapotaire as 'Katherina', Ken Mackintosh as 'Baptista', Annabel Leventon as 'Bianca', Richard Kaye as 'Tranio', Seymour Matthews as 'Lucentio', and Gavin Reed as 'Hortensio'.

Directed by Frank Dunlop with designs by Carl Toms.

This production continued in repertory up to 31 July 1971 before returning on 24 and 25 September 1971 to start the new season at the Young Vic Theatre.


1974 London Revival with Nicky Henson and Susan Hampshire

Previewed 3 October 1974, Opened 7 October 1974, Closed 30 November 1974 at the Shaw Theatre

The cast featured Nicky Henson as 'Petruchio', Susan Hampshire as 'Katherina', Douglas Milvain as 'Baptista', Susan Penhaligon as 'Bianca', Richard Howard as 'Tranio', Anthony Corlan as 'Lucentio', and Derek Seaton as 'Hortensio'.

Directed by James Roose-Evans with designs by Bruno Savtini, lighting by Mick Hughes, and music by Stephen Oliver.

Presented by the Dolphin Theatre Company.


1975 London Revival with Jeremy Irons and Zoe Wanamaker

Opened 3 June 1975, Closed 5 July 1975 at the Roundhouse

The cast featured Jeremy Irons as 'Petruchio', Zoe Wanamaker as 'Katherina', Larry Noble as 'Baptista', Elizabeth Romilly as 'Bianca', Charles Nowosielski as 'Tranio', Christopher Guard as 'Lucentio', and Geoffrey Bateman as 'Hortensio'.

Directed by Mervyn Willis, with designs by Bob Ringwood, and lighting by Brian Benn.

Presented by the New Shakespeare Company at the Roundhouse while their home at the Open Air Theatre in Regent's Park was being rebuilt. Unfortunately the building of the new auditorium was delayed, thus while this production was expected to close at the Roundhouse Theatre on Saturday 21 June 1975, and then transfer to the Open Air Theatre from Monday 23 June for it's final two weeks, it stayed at the Roundhouse to complete it's run. This therefore meant that the first production to be staged at the newly rebuilt Open Air Theatre was not, as had originally been scheduled, this show, but A Midsummer Night's Dream from 16 July 1975.


1977 London Revival with David Henry and Joanna McCallum

Previewed 3 November 1977, Opened 11 November 1977, Closed 25 January 1977 (in repertory) at the Young Vic Theatre

The cast featured David Henry as 'Petruchio', Joanna McCallum as 'Katherina', Hugh Hastings as 'Baptista', Natasha Pyne as 'Bianca', Teddy Green as 'Tranio', Malcolm Reynolds as 'Lucentio', and Job Stewart as 'Hortensio'.

Directed by Frank Dunlop with designs by Carl Toms, and lighting by Mike Alvey.


1979 West End London Revival with Jonathan Pryce, Paola Dionisotti, Zoe Wanamaker, Juliet Stevenson and David Suchet

Previewed 24 April 1979, Opened 27 April 1979, Closed 23 June 1979 (in repertory) at the Aldwych Theatre

The cast featured Jonathan Pryce as 'Petruchio', Paola Dionisotti as 'Katherina', Paul Brooke as 'Baptista', Zoe Wanamaker as 'Bianca', Ian Charleson as 'Tranio', Anthony Higgins as 'Lucentio', and David Lyon as 'Hortensio', with Juliet Stevenson as 'Widow' / 'Curtis', and David Suchet as 'Grumio'. The ensemble included Ruby Wax.

Directed by Michael Bogdanov with designs by Chris Dyer, lighting by Chris Ellis, and music by Tony Haynes.


1982 London Revival with Christopher Neame, Kate O'Mara and Douglas Hodge

Previewed 4 June 1982, Opened 7 June 1982, Closed 27 August 1982 (in repertory) at the Open Air Theatre in Regent's Park

The cast featured Christopher Neame as 'Petruchio', Kate O'Mara as 'Katherina', James Cairncross as 'Baptista', Janet Spencer-Turner as 'Bianca', Michael Remick as 'Tranio', William Relton as 'Lucentio', and Ian Barritt as 'Hortensio', with Douglas Hodge as 'Tailor'.

Directed by Richard Digby Day with designs by Hugh Durrant, and lighting by Ian Callander.

Presented by the New Shakespeare Company in association with the Nottingham Playhouse.


1983 London Revival with Alun Armstrong, Sinead Cusack and Mark Rylance

Previewed 7 April 1983, Opened 28 April 1983, Closed 7 July 1983 (in repertory) at the Barbican Theatre

The cast featured Alun Armstrong as 'Petruchio', Sinead Cusack as 'Katherina', David Waller as 'Baptista', Alice Krige as 'Bianca', John Bowe as 'Tranio', Mark Rylance as 'Lucentio', and Ian Talbot as 'Hortensio', with Pete Postlethwaite as 'Grumio'. The ensemble also included Lesley Sharp.

Directed by Barry Kyle with choreography by Doreen Hermitage, designs by Bob Crowley, lighting by Brian Harris, and music by Nick Bicat.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1986 West End London Revival with Timothy Dalton and Vanessa Redgrave

Previewed 4 June 1986, Opened 10 June 1986, Closed 23 July 1986 (in repertory) at the Haymarket Theatre

The cast featured Timothy Dalton as 'Petruchio', Vanessa Redgrave as 'Katherina', Gerald James as 'Baptista', Kika Markham as 'Bianca', Sylvester McCoy as 'Tranio', Delaval Astley as 'Lucentio', and Martin Chamberlain as 'Hortensio'.

Directed by Toby Robertson and Christopher Selbie, with choreography by Terry John Bates, designs by Simon Higlett, lighting by Pat Nelder, and music by Robert Stewart.

Presented by the Theatr Clwyd Company in repertory with Antony and Cleopatra.


1988 London revival with Brian Cox and Fiona Shaw

Previewed 1 September 1988, Opened 6 September 1988, Closed 23 February 1989 (in repertory) at the RSC Barbican Theatre

The cast featured Brian Cox as 'Petruchio', Fiona Shaw as 'Katherina', George Raistrick as 'Baptista', Felicity Dean as 'Bianca', Barrie Rutter as 'Tranio', Alex Jennings as 'Lucentio', and James Fleet as 'Hortensio'.

Directed by Jonathan Miller with designs by Stephanos Lazaridis, costumes by Martin Chitty, lighting by Davy Cunningham, music by Stephen Oliver and sound by Paul Slocombe.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1993 London Revival with Geordie Johnson, Cathy Tyson and Bernard Bresslaw

Previewed 28 May 1993, Opened 1 June 1993, Closed 10 September 1993 (in repertory) at the Open Air Theatre in Regent's Park

The original cast featured Geordie Johnson as 'Petruchio', Cathy Tyson as 'Katherina', Jonathan Adams as 'Baptista', Catherine Terry as 'Bianca', Clive Carter as 'Tranio', Rupert Wickham as 'Lucentio', and, Ivor Danvers as 'Hortensio', with Bernard Bresslaw as 'Grumio'.

Directed by Tony Robertson with designs by Paul Edwards, lighting by Jason Taylor, and sound by Simon Whitehorn.

Bernard Bresslaw - probably best known for his roles in the Carry On... series of films - was taken ill a couple of hours before the performance on Friday 11 June 1993. Paramedics took him to University College Hospital where he died from a heart attack.


1993 London Revival with Anton Lesser and Amanda Harris

Previewed 15 July 1993, Opened 20 July 1993, Closed 25 November 1993 (in repertory) at the Barbican Theatre

The cast featured Anton Lesser as 'Petruchio', Amanda Harris as 'Katherina', Trevor Martin as 'Baptista', Rebecca Saire as 'Bianca', Richard McCabe as 'Tranio', John McAndrew as 'Lucentio', and Graham Turner as 'Hortensio'.

Directed by Bill Alexander with choreography by Sue Lefton, designs by Tim Goodchild, lighting by Brian Harris, music by Jonathan Goldstein, and sound by Paul Slocombe.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1996 London Revival with Michael Siberry and Josie Lawrence

Previewed 4 April 1996, Opened 9 April 1996, Closed 15 June 1996 (in repertory) at the RSC Barbican Theatre

The cast featured Michael Siberry as 'Petruchio', Josie Lawrence as 'Katherina', Clifford Rose as 'Baptista', Tilly Blackwood as 'Bianca', Mark Lockyer as 'Tranio', Dermot Kerrigan as 'Lucentio', and Timothy Davies as 'Hortensio'.

Directed by Gale Edwards with choreography by Emma Rice, sets by Russell Craig, costumes by Marie-Jeanne Lecca, lighting by Hugh Vanstone, music by Stephen Warbeck, and sound by Paul Slocombe.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1999 London Revival with Stuart McQuarrie and Monica Dolan

Previewed 20 October, Opened 27 October 1999, Closed 20 November 1999 at the Barbican Pit Theatre

The cast featured Stuart McQuarrie as 'Petruchio', Monica Dolan as 'Katherina', Colin McCormack as 'Baptista', Charlotte Randle as 'Bianca', Louis Hilyer as 'Tranio', Jo Stone-Fewings as 'Lucentio', and Simon Coates as 'Hortensio'.

Directed by Lindsay Posner with choreography by Sue Lefton, designs by Ashley Martin-Davis, lighting by Peter Mumford, music by Gary Yershon, and sound by Mic Pool.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company as a 'small-scale' touring production.


2003 London Revival with Janet McTeer and Kathryn Hunter

Previewed 10 August 2003, Opened 21 August 2003, Closed 28 September 2003 at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The cast featured Janet McTeer as 'Petruchio', Kathryn Hunter as 'Katherina', Anna Healy as 'Baptista', Laura Rogers as 'Bianca', Amanda Harris as 'Tranio', Meredith MacNeill as 'Lucentio', and Yolanda Vazquez as 'Hortensio', with Linda Bassett as 'Grumio', Penelope Beaumont as 'Vincentio', Louise Bush as 'Tailor', Penelope Dimond as 'Gremio', Liza Hayden as 'Biondello', Liz Kettle as 'Pedant', Jules Melvin as 'Curtis', Ann Ogbomo as 'Joseph', and Rachel Sanders as 'Widow'.

Directed by Phyllida Lloyd with choreography by Sian Williams, movement by Glynn MacDonald, sets by Jenny Tiramani, costumes by Imogen Ross and Jenny Tiramani, and music by Claire van Kampen.

An all-female production presented by the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre Company.


2004 West End London Revival with Jasper Britton and Alexandra Gilbreath

Previewed 14 January 2004, Opened 15 January 2004, Closed 6 March 2004 (in repertory) at the Queen's Theatre

The cast featured Jasper Britton as 'Petruchio', Alexandra Gilbreath as 'Katherina', Ian Gelder as 'Baptista', Eve Myles as 'Bianca', Rory Kinnear as 'Tranio', Daniel Hawksford as 'Lucentio', and Paul Chahidi as 'Hortensio', with Tom Anderson as 'Nicholas' / 'Haberdasher', Esther Ruth Elliott as 'Sugarsop' / 'Widow', Christopher Godwin as 'Gremio', Christopher Harvey as 'Philip' / 'Tailor', John Lightbody as 'Curtis', Oliver Maltman as 'Peter', Bill Nash as 'Nathaniel', Keith Osborn as 'Rafe' / 'Pedant', David Peart as 'Adam' / 'Vincentio', Nicolas Tennant as 'Grumio', Simon Trinder as 'Biondello', and Beth Vyse as 'Maid'.

Directed by Gregory Doran with movement by Michael Ashcroft, designs by Stephen Brimson Lewis, lighting by Tim Mitchell, music by Paul Englishby, and sound by Martin Slavin.

This production comes into London's West End following a season at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon in April 2003, and is performed in London's West End in repertory with John Fletcher's The Tamer Tamed (performed on Wednesdays and Saturdays).

"Everybody enjoyed Gregory Doran's revival of The Shrew at Stratford last year... so, had Doran done what clever-clever directors often do nowadays and forcibly transformed a sexist comedy into a politically correct tract? No. On the contrary, Doran's production explained why The Shrew counts Germaine Greer, of all people, among its admirers; and all without distorting Shakespeare. In his reading, as in Greer's, Kate longs for a strong, passionate man, not another dull Paduan wimp. But she's trapped in a vicious circle. The more her father fusses over her sister Bianca, the more needy and angry she gets, the more the paternal rejections intensify, and she becomes what Alexandra Gilbreath was at Stratford and is again in London: a raging termagant. Then comes relief and rescue in the form of Jasper Britton's Petruchio. Like her, he's more insecure and vulnerable than his brash manner suggests." The Times

"The Taming of the Shrew is the RSC's latest production to come into the West End. The company manages to make this usually tedious Tudor comedy about a wife with a ferocious temper being brought to heel by her husband not only funny but deeply romantic with it. The two leads are brilliant: Jasper Britton is a hoot as the slob Petruchio, and as his bride, Alexandra Gilbreath is the funniest, maddest, most endearing Kate I've ever seen. The two of them cook up a storm in director Gregory Doran's production, lovingly staged in period costume. With a crack cast, this is a real feelgood company show in which everyone on stage also seems to be having a ball." The Daily Express

"Greg Doran's sensitive, sexy take on The Taming Of The Shrew makes Kate more weird and wild than I've ever seen her to be. Straggly-haired, sociopathic, she shouts and screams and hates everything and everyone, especially herself, which is a vicious circle to be stuck in... Doran makes an unpalatable play palatable by making this a marriage of two misfits; each recognises something in the other which marks them as different, more extreme than those around them. The approach works, and he's helped by the fact that Jasper Britton and Alexandra Gilbreath in the lead roles clash so explosively that sparks fly, igniting a truly erotic relationship. Kate's famous final speech vowing obedience to her husband is probably more politically incorrect than anything currently to be heard in the West End, but the way she says it, so smouldering and breathy and come hither, leaves you in little doubt that, for this pair, it's a bit of foreplay they obviously relish. Hot stuff." The Mail on Sunday

RSC The Taming of the Shrew in London at the Queen's Theatre previewed from 14 January 2004, opened on 15 January 2004, closed on 6 March 2004.


2006 London Revival with John Hodgkinson, Sirine Saba and Sheridan Smith

Previewed 29 June 2006, Opened 5 June 2006, Closed 10 September 2006 (in repertory) at the Open Air Theatre in Regent's Park

The cast featured John Hodgkinson as 'Petruchio', Sirine Saba as 'Katherina', Timothy Kightley as 'Baptista', Sheridan Smith as 'Bianca', David Partridge as 'Tranio', Dominic Marsh as 'Lucentio', and James Wallace as 'Hortensio', with Thomas Aldridge as 'Curtis', James Bisp as 'Haberdasher', David Burrows as 'Tailor', Gerard Carey as 'Grumio', Leo Conville as 'Biondello', Michael Medwin as 'Vincentio', Andrew Melville as 'Gremio', Stuart Nurse as 'Pendant', and Billie-Claire Wright as 'Widow', with Selina Chilton, Matt Dempsey, Haley Flaherty, Helen Owen and Martin McCarthy.

Directed by Rachel Kavanaugh with designs by Kit Surray, lighting by Jason Taylor, sound by Colin Pink, choreography by Jenny Arnold, and music by Terry Davies.


2007 West End London Revival with Dugald Bruce-Lockhart and Simon Scardifield

Previewed 6 January 2007, Opened 17 January 2007, Closed 17 February 2007 (in repertory) at the Old Vic Theatre

The cast featured Dugald Bruce-Lockhart as 'Petruchio' / 'Christopher Sly', Simon Scardifield as 'Katherina', Bob Barrett as 'Baptista', Jon Trenchard as 'Bianca', Tony Bell as 'Tranio', Tam Williams as 'Lucentio', and Jack Tarlton as 'Hortensio', with Jason Baughan as 'Grumio' / 'Pedant', Alasdair Craig as 'Biondello', Joe Flynn as 'Curtis', Chris Myles as 'Gremio' / 'Vincentio', and Dominic Tighe as 'Tailor' / 'Widow'.

Directed by Edward Hall with designs by Michael Pavelka, and lighting by Mark Howland and Ben Ormerod.

An all-male production presented by the Propeller Theatre Company in repertory with Twelfth Night.

In The Taming of the Shrew, a man playing a boy dresses up as a girl, which confuses Christopher Sly. Over the course of the play, Shakespeare takes us on a journey that constantly reminds us that the opposite is always true. The Propeller Theatre Company have previously presented A Midsummer Night's Dream at the Harold Pinter Theatre in 2003.

"Edward Hall brings his all-male company, Propellor, to bear on two Shakespeare plays at the Old Vic... The pick of the pair is The Taming of the Shrew, by far the more difficult play to pull off because of its bluntly sexist theme... But triumph as Petruchio may, what Hall creates at the end is a sense of grief for the passing of the female spirit. This is both a triumph of acting and of Hall's tweaking of the script. He uses the troublesome introduction about a trick played on the drunken Christopher Sly to cunning effect." The Sunday Telegraph

"Playing Shakespeare is hard enough. Playing with his plays is a dangerous game, because you can end up reinterpreting him out of recognition. But relax: with Edward Hall and his all-male company, Propeller, the national treasure is in safe hands. The key to Hall's reading of these plays is simple but subtle. To see a play is not unlike having a dream: you watch, but you are also involved. You are both spectator and participant. And so Christopher Sly, drunken spectator, becomes macho Petruchio, the hero of his own dream." The Sunday Times

"Director Edward Hall and his all-male Propeller company plays it, as it were, straight, with the emphasis on this trickiest of tales as a play within a play staged for the drunk tinker Christopher Sly who segues seamlessly into the character of Petruccio. At the end, Sly wakes from his stupor and thinks it's all been a dream, but one which leaves him confident that he, too, could tame a shrew. Nevertheless, neither the insistence that this is a male fantasy, nor Hall's slapstick staging (which drains the play of every last drop of humour), can disguise the fact that Kate's mental and physical torture into subjugation is no laughing matter. Indeed, the spectacle of Simon Scardifield's hairy-chested Kate, subdued, exhausted, defeated and sullenly obeying Dugald Bruce-Lockhart's swaggering, macho but ultimately pervy Petruccio, is as pitiful and pathetic as that of a dancing bear. When Petruccio turns up to his wedding drunk and wearing nothing but a jockstrap and cowboy boots, his contempt has clearly gone into overdrive and, dream or not, the play suddenly looks like male pornography. If it was called The Taming Of The Jew, it would have been banned years ago." The Mail on Sunday

Propeller Theatre Company The Taming of the Shrew in London at the Old Vic Theatre previewed from 6 January 2007, opened on 17 January 2007 and closed on 17 February 2007.


2009 West End London Revival with Stephen Boxer and Michelle Gomez

Previewed 12 February 2009, Opened 17 February 2009, Closed 7 March 2009 at the Novello Theatre

The cast featured Stephen Boxer as 'Petruchio' / 'Christopher Sly', Michelle Gomez as 'Katherina' / 'Marion Hackett', David Hargreaves as 'Baptista', Amara Karan as 'Bianca' / 'Cicely Hackett', Keir Charles as 'Tranio', Patrick Moy as 'Lucentio', and Sean Kearns as 'Hortensio', with Arsher Ali as 'Philip' / 'Huntsman', Jade Anouka as 'Nicholas' / 'Lady's PA', William Beck as 'Grumio', John Paul Connolly as 'Tailor' / 'Bouncer', Simon Darwen as 'Haberdasher' / 'Huntsman', Adrian Decosta as 'Nathaniel' / 'Huntsman', Leonard Fenton as 'Vincentio', James Garnon as 'Curtis' / 'Player', Amanda Hadingue as 'Widow' / 'Lady', Jack Laskey as 'Biondello', Will Sharpe as 'Joseph' / 'Bartholomew', Peter Shorey as 'Gremio' / 'Player', and Larrington Walker as 'Merchant'.

Directed by Conall Morrison with choreography by Joyce Henderson, sets by Francis O'Connor, costumes by Joan O'Clery, lighting by Paul Keogan, music by Conor Linehan, and sound by Mike Compton.

The Royal Shakespeare Company present William Shakespeare's play The Taming of the Shrew in London directed by Conall Morrison.

The flamboyant Petruchio wins the unruly Kate's hand in marriage. Will his unconventional methods succeed in curing her temper and scolding tongue? Shakespeare explores the sexual politics of marriage in one of his earliest and most controversial comedies. Conall Morrison's iconoclastic take on one of Shakespeare's most problematic comedies sees Stephen Boxer and Michelle Gomez head the cast as the warring Petruchio and the 'Shrew' Kate.

This production comes into London's West End following a season at the Courtyard Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon in May 2008.

"Thunderflashes, lots of simulated sexual intercourse, thudding post Elizabethan house music, lines delivered at 140 beats per minute... come on, you know where we are. It has to be the RSC, doing its familiar and well-loved Carry on Shakespeare routine. And thoroughly enjoyable it is, too... Conall Morrison's production of The Taming of the Shrew works well because this mayhem is meticulously choreographed, and the impressive cast - youngish, in the main, and previously untested in at least one case - somehow possess the chutzpah to bring it off." The Sunday Times

"Moving between the modern day and a cardboard fantasy Italy, the production has a ribald pantomime humour that`s never as funny as it thinks, reaching a nadir with Larrington Wa|ker's 'comedy' Jamaican merchant. Conall Morrison's desolate view of marriage as akin to prostitution (Katherina's limp body at the end echoes the blow-up doll tossed around by the stags) offers few rewards in an evening that's simultaneously dreary and savage." The London Metro

The Royal Shakespeare Company's The Taming of the Shrew previewed from 12 February 2009, opened on 17 February 2009 and closed on 7 March 2009.


2012 London Revival with Simon Paisley Day and Samantha Spiro

Previewed 23 June 2012, Opened 4 July 2012, Closed 13 October 2012 (in repertory) at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The cast featured Simon Paisley Day as 'Petruchio', Samantha Spiro as 'Katherina', Pip Donaghy as 'Baptista', Sarah MacRae as 'Bianca', Jamie Beamish as 'Tranio', Joseph Timms as 'Lucentio', and Rick Warden as 'Hortensio', with Tom Anderson as 'Curtis', David Beames as 'Vincentio' / 'Tailor', Michael Bertenshaw as 'Gremio', Patrick Driver as 'Pedant', Tom Godwin as 'Biondello' / 'Page', Christopher Keegan as 'Nathaniel' / 'Servant', Pearce Quigley as 'Grumio', and Helen Weir as 'Widow'.

Directed by Toby Frow with designs by Mike Britton, and music by Richard Hammarton.


2013 London Revival with Leah Whitaker and Kate Lamb

Opened 10 June 2013, Closed 21 June 2013 (in repertory) at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The cast featured Leah Whitaker as 'Petruchio', Kate Lamb as 'Katherina', Kathryn Hunt as 'Baptista' / 'Grumio', Olivia Morgan as 'Bianca' / 'Biondello', Remy Beasley as 'Tranio', Becci Gemmell as 'Lucentio', and Nicola Sangster as 'Hortensio', with Joy Richardson as 'Gremio' / 'Vincentio' / 'Widow'.

Directed by Joe Murphy with designs by Hannah Clark, and music by Corin Buckeridge.

An all-female production presented by the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre Company.


2016 London Revival with Edward MacLiam and Aoife Duffin

Previewed 13 May 2016, Opened 3 June 2016, Closed 6 August 2016 (in repertory) at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The cast featured Edward MacLiam as 'Petruchio', Aoife Duffin as 'Katherina', Gary Lilburn as 'Baptista', Genevieve Hulme-Beaman as 'Bianca', Imogen Doel as 'Tranio', Aaron Heffernan as 'Lucentio', and Colm Gormley as 'Hortensio', with Amy Conroy as 'Widow' / 'Haberdasher', Louis Dempsey as 'Vincentio', Raymond Keane as 'Gremio', Molly Logan as 'Biondello', and Helen Norton as 'Grumio', with Sean Fox and Ayoola Smart.

Directed by Caroline Byrne with movement by Joe Dieffenbacher, sets by Chiara Stephenson, costumes by Emma Martin, lighting by Natasha Chivers, music by Bill Barclay, and sound by George Dennis.

Kathy Rose O'Brien was originally scheduled to play the role of 'Katherina' in this production but, unfortunately, she broke her foot and had to withdraw from the production, and Aoife Duffin took over the role at short notice. Due to this the 'Opening Night' was delayed, from the original 20 May 2016 date, to the 3 June 2016.


2018 London Revival with Colm Gormley and Rhianna McGreevy

Previewed 11 May 2018, Opened (see note below), Closed 7 September 2018 (in repertory) at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The cast featured Colm Gormley as 'Petruchio', Rhianna McGreevy as 'Katherina', Cynthia Emeagi as 'Baptista', Sarah Finigan as 'Bianca' / 'Grumio', Russell Layton as 'Tranio' / 'Widow', Luke Brady as 'Lucentio', and Steffan Cennydd as 'Hortensio' / 'Pedant', with Jacqueline Phillps as 'Gremio' / 'Vincentio'.

Directed by Brendan O'Hea with choreography by Sian Williams, designs by Andrew D Edwards, and music by Bill Barclay.

This production did not officially 'Open'. Following a two week season in repertory at the Globe Theatre, this production went on a regional tour between 25 May to 18 August 2018, before returning to the Globe Theatre for it's last two weeks as part of the repertory season.