Romeo and Juliet

See also: the new stage musical & Juliet in London which asks: What happened after Shakespeare's Romeo And Juliet finished?

Play by William Shakespeare. The world's most famous story of love and loss. Despite a long-standing feud between the Montagues and the Capulets when Romeo, only son of the Montagues, meets Juliet, the Capulets' only daughter, he falls in love with her and she with him. With the help of Juliet's Nurse, they are married in secret by Friar Lawrence.

Two actors have played the title role/s twice in London in different productions: Zubin Varla in 1993 at the Open Air Theatre, and three years later in 1996 at the Barbican Theatre; and Richard Madden in 2007 at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre, and then nine years later in 2016 at the Garrick Theatre. Also of note are Eduardo Moreira and Fernanda Vianna who have played the title roles, opposite each other, twice in the same production, twelve years apart, presented by Grupo Galpao, Brazil at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre firstly in 2000, and then in 2012.

West End 1956 with John Neville and Claire Bloom - Old Vic Theatre

West End 1960 with John Stride and Judi Dench - Old Vic Theatre

London 1971 with Hugh Ross and Marilyn Taylerson - Open Air Theatre

London 1972 with Simon Ward and Sinead Cusack - Shaw Theatre

West End 1974 with Peter Frith, Michael Kitchen, Veronica Quilligan and Beryl Reid - NT Old Vic Theatre

West End 1977 with Ian McKellen and Francesca Annis - RSC Aldwych Theatre

West End 1979 with Michael Thomas and Janet Maw - Old Vic Theatre

West End 1981 with Anton Lesser and Judy Buxton - RSC Aldwych Theatre

London 1986 with Ralph Fiennes and Sarah Woodward - Open Air Theatre

London 1986 with Kenneth Branagh and Samantha Bond - Hammersmith Lyric Studio

London 1987 with Sean Bean and Niamh Cusack - RSC Barbican Theatre

London 1990 with Mark Rylance and Georgia Slowe - RSC Barbican Pit Theatre

London 1992 with Michael Maloney and Clare Holman - RSC Barbican Theatre

London 1993 with Zubin Varla and Rebecca Callard - Open Air Theatre

London 1994 with Matthias Leja and Caroline Ebner - Barbican Theatre

London 1994 with the Itim Theatre Ensemble / Carmeri Theatre of Tel Aviv - Barbican Pit Theatre

London 1996 with Zubin Varla and Lucy Whybrow - RSC Barbican Theatre

London 1997 with Ray Fearon and Zoe Waites - RSC Barbican Pit Theatre

London 2000 with Eduardo Moreira and Fernanda Vianna - Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

London 2000 with Chiwetel Ejiofor and Charlotte Randle - NT Olivier Theatre

London 2001 with David Tennant and Alexandra Gilbreath - RSC Barbican Theatre

London 2002 with Alan Westaway, Laura Main and Benedict Cumberbatch - Open Air Theatre

West End 2002 Romeo And Juliet The Musical - Piccadilly Theatre

London 2003 Shakespeare R & J - Arts Theatre

West End 2004 with Gisli Orn Gardarson and Nina Dogg Filippusdottir - Playhouse Theatre

London 2004 with Tom Burke and Kananu Kirimi - Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

West End 2004 with Matthew Rhys and Sian Brooke - RSC Albery Theatre

London 2006 with Kim Byung Cheol and Kim Mun Jung - Barbican Pit Theatre

London 2007 with Richard Madden and Ellie Piercy - Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

London 2008 with Nicholas Shaw and Laura Donnelly - Open Air Theatre

London 2009 with Adetomiwa Edun and Ellie Kendrick - Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

London 2010 with Sam Troughton and Mariah Gale - RSC Roundhouse

London 2012 with Eduardo Moreira and Fernanda Vianna - Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

London 2013, 2014, 2017 with Tendayi Jembere, Natalie Dew, Sheena Bhattessa, Nana Amoo-Gottfried and Sharan Phull - NT Shed/Dorfman

West End 2013 with Niall McNamee and Aruhan Galieva - Ambassadors Theatre

London 2015 with Samuel Valentine and Cassie Layton - Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

West End 2016 with James Mace and Shalisha James-Davis - Ambassadors Theatre

West End 2016 with Richard Madden, Lily James and Freddie Fox - Garrick Theatre

London 2017 with Edward Hogg and Kirsty Bushell - Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

London 2018 with Bally Gill and Karen Fishwick - RSC Barbican Theatre

London 2019 with Nathan Welsh and Charlotte Beaumont - Shakespeare's Globe Theatre


West End 1956 with John Neville and Claire Bloom - Old Vic Theatre

Opened 12 June 1956, Closed 7 July 1956 (in repertory) at the Old Vic Theatre

The cast included John Neville as 'Romeo' and Claire Bloom as 'Juliet'.

Directed by Robert Helpmann with designs by Loudon Sainthill.

Presented by the Old Vic Company.


West End 1960 with John Stride and Judi Dench - Old Vic Theatre

Opened 4 October 1960, Closed 17 August 1961 (in repertory) at the Old Vic Theatre

The cast included John Stride as 'Romeo' and Judi Dench as 'Juliet', with Alec McCowen as 'Mercutio', Peggy Mount as 'Nurse', and Tom Courtenay as 'Abraham'.

Directed and designed by Franco Zeffirelli, with costumes by Peter J Hall, and music by Nino Rota.

Presented by the Old Vic Company.


London 1971 with Hugh Ross and Marilyn Taylerson - Open Air Theatre

Previewed 31 May 1971, Opened 2 June 1971, Closed 10 July 1971 at the Open Air Theatre

The cast included Hugh Ross as 'Romeo' and Marilyn Taylerson as 'Juliet'.

Directed by Richard Digby Day with designs by Kit Surrey.


London 1972 with Simon Ward and Sinead Cusack - Shaw Theatre

Previewed 31 January 1972, Opened 1 February 1972, Closed 18 March 1972 at the Shaw Theatre

The cast included Simon Ward as 'Romeo' and Sinead Cusack as 'Juliet', with Constance Chapman as 'Nurse'.

Directed by Michael Croft with sets by Christopher Lawrence, and costumes by John Bright.


West End 1974 with Peter Frith, Michael Kitchen, Veronica Quilligan and Beryl Reid - NT Old Vic Theatre

Opened 28 August 1974, Closed 14 September 1974 (in repertory) at the Old Vic Theatre

The cast included Peter Frith as 'Romeo', Michael Kitchen as 'Romeo' from 5 September 1974, Veronica Quilligan as 'Juliet', and Beryl Reid as 'Nurse'.

Directed by Bill Bryden with designs by Hayden Griffin.

Presented by the National Theatre.


West End 1977 with Ian McKellen and Francesca Annis - RSC Aldwych Theatre

Previewed 5 July 1977, Opened 6 July 1977, Closed 15 October 1977 (in repertory) at the Aldwych Theatre

The cast included Ian McKellen as 'Romeo', Francesca Annis as 'Juliet', with Michael Pennington as 'Mercutio', John Woodvine as 'Lord Caplet', Roger Rees as 'Benvolio', and Greg Hicks as 'Balthazer'.

Directed by Trevor Nunn with designs by Chris Dyer.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


West End 1979 with Michael Thomas and Janet Maw - Old Vic Theatre

Previewed 14 August 1979, Opened 17 August 1979, Closed 22 December 1979 (in repertory) at the Old Vic Theatre

The cast included Michael Thomas as 'Romeo' and Janet Maw as 'Juliet', with Ian Richardson as 'Mercutio', and Barbara Jefford as 'Nurse'.

Directed by Toby Robertson and Christopher Selbie, with designs by Robin Archer.

Presented by the Old Vic Theatre Company.


West End 1981 with Anton Lesser and Judy Buxton - RSC Aldwych Theatre

Previewed 6 October 1981, Opened 9 October 1981, Closed 31 October 1981 (in repertory) at the Aldwych Theatre

The cast included Anton Lesser as 'Romeo' and Judy Buxton as 'Juliet'.

Directed by Ron Daniels with designs by Ralph Koltai.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


London 1986 with Ralph Fiennes and Sarah Woodward - Open Air Theatre

Previewed 30 May 1986, Opened 2 June 1986, Closed 30 August 1986 (in repertory) at the Regent's Park Open Air Theatre

The cast included Ralph Fiennes as 'Romeo' and Sarah Woodward as 'Juliet', with Hugh Bonneville as 'Abram'.

Directed by Declan Donnellan with designs by Nick Ormerod.


London 1986 with Kenneth Branagh and Samantha Bond - Hammersmith Lyric Studio

Previewed 13 August 1986, Opened 14 August 1986, Closed 6 September 1986 at the Lyric Studio, Hammersmith

The cast included Kenneth Branagh as 'Romeo' and Samantha Bond as 'Juliet'.

Directed by Kenneth Branagh with designs by Kate Burnett.


London 1987 with Sean Bean and Niamh Cusack - RSC Barbican Theatre

Previewed 9 April 1987, Opened 14 April 1987, Closed 1 October 1987 (in repertory) at the Barbican Theatre

The cast included Sean Bean as 'Romeo' and Niamh Cusack as 'Juliet'.

Directed by Michael Bogdanov with choreography by Kenn Oldfield, sets by Chris Dyer, and costumes by Alan Watkins, Ginny Humphries and Chris Dyer.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


London 1990 with Mark Rylance and Georgia Slowe - RSC Barbican Pit Theatre

Previewed 13 December 1990, Opened 4 January 1990, Closed 8 March 1990 (in repertory) at the Barbican Pit Theatre

The cast included Mark Rylance as 'Romeo' and Georgia Slowe as 'Juliet'.

Directed by Terry Hands with choreography by Anthony Van Laast, designs by Abd'Elkader Farrah, and music by Claire Van Kampen.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


London 1992 with Michael Maloney and Clare Holman - RSC Barbican Theatre

Previewed 18 June 1992, Opened 24 June 1992, Closed 28 November 1992 (in repertory) at the Barbican Theatre

The cast included Michael Maloney as 'Romeo' and Clare Holman as 'Juliet', with Sheila Reid as 'Nurse'.

Directed by David Leveaux with movement by Sue Lefton, designs by Alison Chitty, lighting by Alan Burrett, music by Ilona Sekacz, and sound by Paul Slocombe.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


London 1993 with Zubin Varla and Rebecca Callard - Open Air Theatre

Previewed 14 June 1993, Opened 16 June 1993, Closed 11 September 1993 (in repertory) at the Regent's Park Open Air Theatre

The cast included Zubin Varla as 'Romeo' and Rebecca Callard as 'Juliet', with Janie Dee as 'Lady Capulet'.

Directed by Judi Dench with assistant director Rachel Kavanaugh, choreography by Lindsay Dolan, designs by Jack Notman, lighting by Jason Taylor, music by Mark Emney, and sound by Simon Whitehorn.


London 1994 with Matthias Leja and Caroline Ebner - Barbican Theatre

Opened 2 November 1994, Closed 5 November 1994 at the Barbican Theatre

Presented by Dusseldorfer Schauspielhaus, Germany, as part of the Everyone's Shakespeare International Fetival.

Performed in German, translated by Frank Gunther.

The cast included Matthias Leja as 'Romeo' and Caroline Ebner as 'Juliet'.

Directed by Karin Beier.


London 1994 with the Itim Theatre Ensemble / Carmeri Theatre of Tel Aviv - Barbican Pit Theatre

Opened 8 November 1994, Closed 12 November 1994 at the Barbican Pit Theatre

Presented by the Itim Theatre Ensemble in association with the Carmeri Theatre of Tel Aviv, as part of the Everyone's Shakespeare International Festival.

Performed in Hebrew, translated by Raphael Eliaz, in an adaptation by Rina Yerushalmi.

The cast included Tchernovitz Gil, Ben-Azar Noam and Chefetz Raanan as 'Romeo', and Pardo Amichal, Wolpe Iyar, Gaathon Yael and Giladi Yiffatt as 'Juliet'.

Directed by Rina Yerushalmi.

Note: Multiple actors played or said the words of Romeo and Juliet during the performance.


London 1996 with Zubin Varla and Lucy Whybrow - RSC Barbican Theatre

Previewed 18 April 1996, Opened 23 April 1996, Closed 27 August 1996 in repertory) at the Barbican Theatre

The cast included Zubin Varla as 'Romeo' and Lucy Whybrow as 'Juliet'.

Directed by Adrian Noble with choreography by Sue Lefton, designs by Kendra Ullyart, lighting by Hugh Vanstone, music by Shaun Davey, and sound by Paul Slocombe.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


London 1997 with Ray Fearon and Zoe Waites - RSC Barbican Pit Theatre

Previewed 29 October 1997, Opened 5 November 1997, Closed 15 November 1997 at the Barbican Pit Theatre

The cast included Ray Fearon as 'Romeo' and Zoe Waites as 'Juliet'.

Directed by Michael Attenborough with choreography by Terry John Bates, designs by Robert Jones, lighting by Tim Mitchell, music by Stephen Warbeck, and sound by John A Leonard.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


London 2000 with Eduardo Moreira and Fernanda Vianna - Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

Previewed 11 July 2000, Opened 12 July 2000, Closed 23 July 2000 (in repertory) at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre.

Presented by Grupo Galpao, Brazil, and performed in Brazilian.

The cast included Eduardo Moreira as 'Romeo' and Fernanda Vianna as 'Juliet'.

Directed and concieved by Gabriel Villela.

This production returned to the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre in 2012.


London 2000 with Chiwetel Ejiofor and Charlotte Randle - NT Olivier Theatre

Previewed 4 September 2000, Opened 3 October 2000, Closed 4 December 2000 (in repertory) at the NT Olivier Theatre

The cast featured Chiwetel Ejiofor as 'Romeo' and Charlotte Randle as 'Juliet', with Patrick O'Kane as 'Mercutio', Andy Williams as 'Tybalt', Paul Hickey as 'Paris', Beverley Klein as 'Nurse', Lloyd Hutchinson as 'Friar Laurence', Jason Rose as 'Lord Montague', Susan Aderin as 'Lady Montague', Ronald Pickup as 'Lord Capulet', Olwen Fouere as 'Lady Capulet', Kolade Agboke as 'Balthasar', Adrian Irvine as 'Benvolio', Craig Conway as 'Gregory', Victor Power as 'Escalus', Anthony Renshaw as 'Samson' / 'Apothecary', Adrian Sarple as 'Peter', Andrew Ufondu as 'Abram', Benny Young as 'Friar John', John Burgess, Ruairi Conaghan, Jeff Diamond, Branwell Donaghey, Fritha Goodey, Christopher John Hall, Sophie James, Adam Jones, Melanie MacHugh, Anita McCann, Marcella Riordan, Amanda Symonds, Anthony Taylor, Hannah Watkins, and Oliver Williams.

Directed by Tim Supple with choreography by Jane Gibson, designs by Robert Innes Hopkins, lighting by Paule Constable, music by Adrian Lee, and sound by Paul Groothuis.


London 2001 with David Tennant and Alexandra Gilbreath - RSC Barbican Theatre

Previewed 11 January 2001, Opened 17 January 2001, Closed 8 March 2001 (in repertory) at the Barbican Theatre

The cast featured David Tennant as 'Romeo' and Alexandra Gilbreath as 'Juliet', with Adrian Schiller as 'Mercutio', Keith Dunphy as 'Tybalt', Nicholas Khan as 'Paris', Eileen McCallum as 'Nurse', Des McAleer as 'Friar Lawrence', Vincent Brimble as 'Montague', Helen Weir as 'Lady Montague', Ian Hogg as 'Capulet', Caroline Harris as 'Lady Capulet', Christian Mahrle as 'Balthasar', Anthony Howell as 'Benvolio', Alfred Burke as 'Escalus', Sam Cox as 'Cousin Capulet', Robert Goodale as 'Peter', Jalaal Hartley as 'Abram', Andrew Pointon as 'Gregory', Tim Treloar as 'Sampson', Claire Adamson, Paul Ewing, and Graeme Mearns.

Directed by Michael Boyd with movement by Liz Ranken, designs by Tom Piper, lighting by Chris Davey, music by Stephen Warbeck, and sound by Mic Pool.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


London 2002 with Alan Westaway, Laura Main and Benedict Cumberbatch - Open Air Theatre

Previewed 28 May 2002, Opened 5 June 2002, Closed 5 September 2002 (in repertory) at the Regent's Park Open Air Theatre

The cast featured Alan Westaway as 'Romeo' and Laura Main as 'Juliet', with John Hodgkinson as 'Mercutio', Adam Levy as 'Tybalt', Ben Goddard as 'Paris', Carol Macready as 'Nurse', Timothy Kightly as 'Friar Laurence', Jon Cartwright as 'Lord Montague', Audrey Palmer as 'Lady Montague', Christopher Godwin as 'Lord Capulet', Liza Sadovy as 'Lady Capulet', Dominic Marsh as 'Balthasar', Benedict Cumberbatch as 'Benvolio', Daniel Crossley as 'Abram', Michael Medwin as 'Cousin Capulet', Tam Mutu as 'Sampson', Harry Peacock as 'Peter', Michael Sadler as 'Escalus', Guy Vincent as 'Gregory', Alicia Davies, Abigail Langham, and Caitlin Mottram.

Directed by Dominic Hill with choreography by Lisa Kent, designs by Francis O'Connor, lighting by Jason Taylor, music by Terry Davies, and sound by Simon Whitehorn and Emma Laxton.


West End 2002 Romeo And Juliet The Musical - Piccadilly Theatre

Previewed 12 October 2002, Opened 4 November 2002, Closed 8 February 2003 at the Piccadilly Theatre

The hugely popular French musical - based on Shakespeare's play of the same name - comes to London.

Musical with music by Gerard Presgurvic, lyrics by Don Black, and book by Don Black and David Freeman, with original concept by Gerard Presgurvic.

The cast featured Andrew Bevis 'Romeo', Lorna Want as 'Juliet', Zara Dawson as 'Juliet' at certain performances, with Rachid Sabitri 'Mercutio', Alexis James 'Tybalt', Tim Walton 'Paris', Jane McDonald 'Nurse', Sevan Stephan 'Friar Lawrence', James Graeme 'Lord Montague', Louise Davidson 'Lady Montague', David Bardsley 'Lord Capulet', Michele Hooper 'Lady Capulet', Matt Dempsey 'Benvolio', Michael Cormick 'Escalus', along with Simon Bailey, David Christopher, Amy Creighhton, Stuart Dawes, Zara Dawson, Hadrian Delacey, Lez Dwight, Magnus Engqvist-James, Susie Fenwick, Chris Middlebrook, Ebony Molina, Tamsin Stewart, Carly Tancredi, Melanie Tate, Gary Tushaw, Tamara Wall and Matthew Wolfenden, along with Chloe Ball, Jo Cavanagh, Nic Ineson and Martin Matthias.

Directed by David Freeman with choreography by Christine Hassid, designs by David Roger, lighting by Durham Marenghi, and sound by Whizz.

"There are even faint but persistent echoes of Alain Boubill's and Claude-Michel Schonberg's Les Miserables. The murder of Rachid Sabitri's stodgy Mercutio only thrills because of the menace of the fatal fight scene that Malcolm Ranson organised. Sexual desire, the play's goading factor, hardly looms large or vigorous. The teenage stars put up valiant, committed performances. And Miss Want's timid, put-upon, childlike Jullet is as affecting as inept songs and dialogue allow" The London Evening Standard

"Pitifully poor, witless and lacklustre Romeo And Juliet - The Musical which opened this week and is, I fear, doomed to an early death as surely as Shakespeare's young star-crossed lovers. The show begins with these fateful words: 'If you think you've seen it all, then you had better think again. Don't care how many books you've read. Or how many lands you've seen. You're still not prepared for this.' You bet. I couldn't have said it better myself. Having survived Lautrec and Notre Dame de Paris, I thought I was armed for the worst that even a French musical could throw at me. Nothing, however, can prepare you for the awesome banality of Don Black's lyrics, matched only by Gerard Presgurvic's vapid Europop score. It's like being clubbed to death with wet wallpaper. One of the most hideous lines - 'Fools, fools, men are like stubborn mules' - has become embedded in my head like an insidious piece of shrapnel. Try as I might, I can find nothing positive to say about this show which was, staggeringly, a huge hit in Paris... Not surprisingly, given the material, little Lorna Want's Juliet sings with no passion whatsoever... Andrew Bevis's Romeo suffers similarly and comes across as a cutie-pie with a personality bypass who could slot nicely into a new boy band. Jane McDonald attempts (fitfully) to give Juliet's Nurse some Northern brass, but even a voice as strong as hers cannot infuse this flat, colourless drivel with any heart. The rest of the youngsters, in low-rise sequinned jeans and leather jackets, look like the Kids From Fame struggling through a Seventies Pan's People dance class, a hopeless, uncomfortable and ill-considered clash of styles... Oh, for a blast of Bernstein's West Side Story or a scrap of Sondheim's lyrical talent to relieve this mercifully forgettable tosh." The Mail on Sunday

"Sitting through this show is a depressing and bizarre experience. It's as though someone had translated the play, precised it, and then translated that synopsis back into English. The plot is there, but all the original words have vanished, along with character development, dramatic insight, subtlety and depth. The music, bland, loud Europop, attempts to give the story a modern feel... Romeo and Juliet at least look sweet, Andrew Bevis wielding those boy-band good looks and a strong voice, and Lorna Want, who is only 15, making Juliet a feisty, not to say stroppy teenager." The Financial Times

Romeo And Juliet The Musical in London at the Piccadilly Theatre previewed from 12 October 2002, opened on 4 November 2002 and closed on 8 February 2003


London 2003 Shakespeare R & J - Arts Theatre

Previewed 3 September 2003, Opened 8 September 2003, Closed 8 November 2003 at the Arts Theatre

Presented by The Splinter Group in an adaptation by Joe Calarco.

The cast featured Matthew Sincell as 'Student 1' ('Romeo' and others), Jason Michael Spelbring as 'Student 2' ('Juliet' and others), Jeremy Beck as 'Student 3' ('Mercutio' and others), and Jason Dubin as 'Student 4' ('Nurse' and others).

Directed by Joe Calarco with sets by Michael Fagin, costumes by Amela Baksic, lighting by Chris Lee, and sound by Brian Keating.

A school. Four school boys. A smuggled copy of the forbidden Shakespearean play Romeo and Juliet. A secret enactment.


West End 2004 with Gisli Orn Gardarson and Nina Dogg Filippusdottir - Playhouse Theatre

Previewed 26 September 2003, Opened 1 October 2003, Closed 8 November 2003 at the Young Vic Theatre
Previewed 13 November 2004, Opened 18 November 2004, Closed 9 January 2005 at the Playhouse Theatre

This production of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet is subtitled Love is in the Air and is a circus-orientated version of the classic play using acrobatic, aerobatic and clown-esque techniques, all without losing the tragic fundaments of the play. Inspired by the world of circus performance, this production of Romeo and Juliet explores the devotion of the two young lovers using stunning aerial and acrobatic choreography. Passionate and dangerous, wrapped in silk, this is a high-octane, part-romantic, part clowning, encounter between Shakespeare's 'star-cross'd lovers'.

Presented by Vesturport Theatre, Iceland, in an adaptation by Gisli Orn Garoarsson, Tanya Ronder and Hallgrimur Helgason.

The cast at London's Young Vic Theatre in 2003 featured Gisli Orn Gardarson as 'Romeo' and Nina Dogg Filippusdottir as 'Juliet', with Stefan Hristov Dermendjiev, Olafur Egill Egilsson, Erlendur Eiriksson, Arni Petur Gudjonsson, Tomas Aron Gudmundsson, Bjorn Hlynur Haraldsson, Vikingur Kristjansson, Olafur Darri Olafsson, Ingvar E Sigurdsson, Johannes Niels Sigurdsson, and Margret Vilhjalmsdottir.

The cast at the Playhouse Theatre in London's West End in 2004 featured Gisli Orn Gardarson as 'Romeo' and Nina Dogg Filippusdottir as 'Juliet', with Krisjan Arsaelsson, Erlendur Eiriksson, Tomas Aron Gudmundsson, Arni Petur Guojonsson, Bjorn Hlynur Haraldsson, Thor Kristinssone, Vikingur Kristjansson, Olafur Darri Olafsson, Gotti Sigurdarson, Johannes Niels Sigurdsson, and Margret Vilhjalmsdottir.

Directed by Gisli Orn Gardarson with choreography by Katrin Hall, sets by Borkur Jonsson, and costumes by Thorunn Elisabet Sveinsdottir. At Young Vic: lighting by Paul Russell and sound by Crispin Covell. At the Playhouse House: lighting by Tim Mitchell and sound by Karl Olgeirsson.

For the West End Playhouse Theatre run, a short six-line epilogue was spoken live on stage by a special guest star which included Vanessa Redgrave, Sean Connery, Joanna Lumley, Jonathan Pryce, Dawn French, Derek Jacobi and Jenny Seagrove.

"European directors often approach Shakespeare with an entirely fresh eye, unhampered in the way their English counterparts are by too much textual reverence. But while this circus-style production by Icelandic theatre company Vesturport certainly belongs in the theatre rather than the church, it is too much about showmanship and not enough about basic storytelling... The problem is that the production is so in love with itself and its own little kitsch jokes - some good; and some terrible - that it forgets to tell the story until after the interval. Shakespeare wrote more than enough of Romeo and Juliet without adding lots of entirely unnecessary bits." The Guardian

"The holiday season gets off to a flying start with the return of this eye-catching Icelandic version of Romeo and Juliet, first seen at the Young Vic last year, and now laying mischievous, muscular siege to the West End. Bringing a defiantly physical spin to a text too often associated with desk-bound scholarship and dewy-eyed conventionality, Reykjavik ensemble Vesturport liberate the play's youthful zest through big-top acrobatics and a fire-breathing, anarchic sense of fun... What the 13-strong cast lack in verbal prowess, they make up for with a visual ingenuity that marries Shakespeare's imagery with breathtaking spectacle... What had risked seeming like a gravity-defying Nordic novelty act has magically acquired the necessary gravitas of a timeless tragedy." The Daily Telegraph

An Icelandic Romeo and Juliet seems as incongruous as a tropical Snow Queen or a Saharan revival of Ibsen's Brand. The dramatic temperature both of torrid Verona and of Shakespeare's most feverish tragedy will surely be wrong; or so we thought when we first saw Theater Vesturport's English-language adaptation at the Young Vic last year. Well, we couldn't have been more mistaken then, and anyone who brings similar prejudices to Gisli Orn Gardarsson's circus-style revival at the Playhouse this year couldn't be more mistaken now. My purist side naturally disapproves of an evening in which Romeo is so literally head over heels in love that he holds an airborne Juliet while hanging upside down from one of Capulet's chandeliers... My more open self remembers that the Young Vic was created for audiences yet to graduate to middle-aged events at the Old Vic, and, though the Playhouse's proscenium stage is less suited to the antics of these big-top Icelanders, still admires their fizz and inventiveness... Eccentric? Yes. Striking and even a little moving? Yes, too." The Times

Vesturport's Romeo and Juliet in London at the Playhouse Theatre previewed from 13 November 2004, opened on 18 November 2004 and closed on 9 January 2005.


London 2004 with Tom Burke and Kananu Kirimi - Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

Previewed 7 May 2004, Opened 19 May 2004, Closed 26 September 2004 (in repertory) at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The cast featured Tom Burke as 'Romeo' and Kananu Kirimi as 'Juliet', with James Garnon as 'Mercutio', Simon Muller as 'Tybalt', Callum Coates as 'Paris' / 'Gregory', Bette Bourne as 'Nurse', John McEnery as 'Friar Lawrence', Terry McGinity as 'Lord Montague' / 'Apothecary', Julia Marsen as 'Lady Montague', Bill Stewart as 'Lord Capulet', Melanie Jessop as 'Lady Capulet', Tas Emiabata as 'Balthasar', Rhys Meredith as 'Benvolio' / 'Friar John', John Paul Connolly as 'Peter', and Joel Trill as 'Escalus'.

Directed by Tim Carroll with movement by Glynn MacDonald, choreography by Sian Williams, costumes by Jenny Tiramani, and music by William Lyons.


West End 2004 with Matthew Rhys and Sian Brooke - RSC Albery Theatre

Previewed 16 December 2004, Opened 21 December 2004, Closed 8 January 2005 at the Albery Theatre (now Noel Coward Theatre)

The Royal Shakespeare Company present Romeo and Juliet in London directed by Peter Gill.

The cast featured Matthew Rhys as 'Romeo' and Sian Brooke as 'Juliet', with Gideon Turner as 'Mercutio', Tam Mutu as 'Tybalt', Jonathan Forbes as 'Paris', June Watson as 'Nurse', Peter Bygott as 'Friar Laurence', Sion Tudor Owen as 'Lord Montague', Anita Booth as 'Lady Montague', David Hargreaves as 'Lord Capulet', Emily Raymond as 'Lady Capulet', Samuel Clemens as 'Balthasar', Trystan Gravelle as 'Benvolio', Caolan Byrne as 'Abram' / 'Friar John', Edward Clarke as 'Gregory', Matt Cross as 'Peter', James Curran as 'Apothecary' / 'Old Capulet', Jessica Tomehak as 'Lady', Leo Wringer as 'Escalus', and Anatol Yusef as 'Sampson'.

Directed by Peter Gill with sets by Simon Daw, costumes by Deirdre Clancy, lighting by Hartley T A Kemp, music by Terry Davies, and sound by Jeremy Dunn.

"The great novelty of this new Romeo and Juliet is that it's staged with chaps in tights. Usually with this play it's updated with youths in bomber jackets and carrying mobiles... The trouble with Peter Gill's in period production is that it's emotionally a bit sedate. The early infatuation between the lovers never quite develops into teenage passion at its most heart-tearing and hormonal. The set - Verona as seen on a tourist tea towel - doesn't help. Sian Brooke's Juliet is lovely but she sounds a little too mature and confident. Matthew Rhys is an appealing, meat-and-potatoes Romeo. But while the pair go through the motions, the sparks don't fly." The Daily Express

"Peter Gill's productions are rightly celebrated for their precise attention to detail and a passionate intensity, especially when the play is one of his own family dramas. Romeo and Juliet is a family drama of tragic intensity, but on his return to directing for the RSC, Gill's sure touch seems to have left him. A cool simplicity shapes his production: too cool... The setting is uncluttered, but somehow generalised, as is the acting. The young men are very young and, judging from their verse-speaking, in a hurry. Matthew Rhys is an intelligent Romeo... He falls in love with Sian Brooke's equally young, but much more innocent Juliet with remarkable speed... Looking for clarity, Gill has evened out the shadows, losing specificity and complexity to create an oddly uneventful evening." The Sunday Times

Romeo and Juliet in London at the Noel Coward Theatre previewed from 16 December 2004, opened on 21 December 2004 and closed on 8 January 2005.


London 2006 with Kim Byung Cheol and Kim Mun Jung - Barbican Pit Theatre

Opened 23 November 2006, Closed 9 December 2006 at the Barbican Pit Theatre

Presented by the Mokhwa Reperty Theatre, South Korea, in an adaptation by Oh Tae-Suk.

The cast included Kim Byung Cheol as 'Romeo' and Kim Mun Jung as 'Juliet'.

Directed by Oh Tae-Suk with choreography by Bae Jung Hae, sets by Cho Eun A, costumes by Lee Seung Moo, lighting by Aikawa Masaaki, music by Hwang Gang Rok, and sound by Kim Byung Cheol.

Performed in Korean with English surtitles.


London 2007 with Richard Madden and Ellie Piercy - Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

Opened 17 June 2007, Closed 17 June 2007 (one performance only) at Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The cast featured Richard Madden as 'Romeo' and Ellie Piercy as 'Juliet', with Tas Emiabata, Tyne Rafaeli, Eliot Shrimpton, Mark Springer, Julian Stolzenberg, and Paul Woodson.

Directed by Edward Dick with designs by Anthony Lamble, and music by Dominic Muldowney.

Presented by the Globe Theatre, this was a small-scale touring production which started it's tour with a special one-off performance at the Globe Theatre.


London 2008 with Nicholas Shaw and Laura Donnelly - Open Air Theatre

Previewed 2 June 2008, Opened 9 June 2008, Closed 2 August 2008 (in repertory) at the Regent's Park Open Air Theatre

The cast featured Nicholas Shaw as 'Romeo' and Laura Donnelly as 'Juliet', with Oscar Pearce as 'Mercutio', Ben Joiner as 'Tybalt', Neet Mohan as 'Paris', Claire Benedict as 'Nurse', Richard O'Callaghan as 'Friar Lawrence', David Whitworth as 'Lord Montague', Jennifer Bryden as 'Lady Montague', Tim Woodward as 'Lord Capulet', Annette McLaughlin as 'Lady Capulet', Ben Ingles as 'Balthasar', Leon Williams as 'Benvolio', Richard Cotton as 'Escalus', Andy Cryer as 'Gregory', Matthew Hart as 'Sampson', Dale Superville as 'Peter', Marcello Walton as 'Abram' / 'Apothecary', Harry Myers as 'Friar John', and Annalisa Rossi as 'Bianca'.

Directed by Timothy Sheader with movement by Liam Steel, sets by Robert Innes Hopkins, costumes by Fotini Dimou, lighting by Simon Mills, music by David Shrubsole, and sound by Fergus O'Hare.


London 2009 with Adetomiwa Edun and Ellie Kendrick - Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

Previewed 23 April 2009, Opened 30 April 2009, Closed 23 August 2009 (in repertory) at Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The cast featured Adetomiwa Edun as 'Romeo' and Ellie Kendrick as 'Juliet', with Phil Cumbus as 'Mercutio', Ukweli Roach as 'Tybalt', Tom Stuart as 'Paris', Penny Layden as 'Nurse', Rawiri Paratene as 'Friar Lawrence', Michael O'Hagan as 'Lord Montague', Holly Atkins as 'Lady Montague', Ian Redford as 'Lord Capulet', Miranda Foster as 'Lady Capulet', Fergal McElherron as 'Balthazar' / 'Peter' / 'Gregory', Jack Farthing as 'Benvolio', James Lailey as 'Sampson'/ 'Friar John', Graham Vick as 'Abraham' / 'Apothecary', Andrew Vincent as 'Escalus', Lucy Conway, Jason Carter, Rhoda Ofori-Attah, and Stevie Raine.

Directed by Dominic Dromgoole with choreography by Sian Williams, designs by Simon Daw, and music by Nigel Hess.


London 2010 with Sam Troughton and Mariah Gale - RSC Roundhouse

Previewed 30 November 2010, Opened 2 December 2010, Closed 1 January 2011 (in repertory) at the Roundhouse

The cast featured Sam Troughton as 'Romeo' and Mariah Gale as 'Juliet', with Jonjo O'Neill as 'Mercutio', Joseph Arkley as 'Tybalt', James Howard as 'Paris', Noma Dumezweni as 'Nurse', Forbes Masson as 'Friar Laurence', David Rubin as 'Lord Montague', Simone Saunders as 'Lady Montague', Richard Katz as 'Lord Capulet', Christine Entwisle as 'Lady Capulet', Gruffudd Glyn as 'Balthasar', Oliver Ryan as 'Benvolio', David Carr as 'Escalus', Dyfan Dwyfor as 'Peter', Debbie Korley as 'Lady', Dharmesh Patel as 'Gregory', Peter Peverley as 'Abraham' / 'Friar John', Patrick Romer as 'Cousin Capulet' / 'Apothecary', James Traherne as 'Sampson', and Kirsty Woodward as 'Lady'.

Directed by Rupert Goold with choreography by Georgina Lamb, movement by Struan Leslie, designs by Tom Scutt, video by Lorna Heavey, lighting by Howard Harrison, and music and sound by Adam Cork.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


London 2012 with Eduardo Moreira and Fernanda Vianna - Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

Opened 19 May 2012, Closed 20 May 2012 at Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

Presented by Grupo Galpao from Brazil, as part of the Globe to Globe 2012 Shakespeare Festival.

The cast included Eduardo Moreira as 'Romeo' and Fernanda Vianna as 'Juliet'.

Directed and concieved by Gabriel Villela.

Performed in Brazilian. This production was previously seen at the Shakespeare's Globe in 2000.


London 2013, 2014, 2017 with Tendayi Jembere, Natalie Dew, Sheena Bhattessa, Nana Amoo-Gottfried and Sharan Phull - NT Shed/Dorfman

Opened 24 July 2013, Closed 2 August 2013 (in repertory) at the NT Shed Theatre (now demolished)
Returned 29 October 2014, Closed 14 November 2014 (in repertory) at the NT Shed Theatre (now demolished)
Returned 11 February 2017, Closed 24 February 2017 (in repertory) at the NT Dorfman Theatre

Presented by the National Theatre in a new adaptation for young people (aged 8 to 12) by Ben Powers.

The 2013 NT Shed Theatre cast featured Tendayi Jembere as 'Romeo' and Natalie Dew as 'Juliet', with Esh Alladim, Ashley Chin, Lashana Lynch, Bunmi Mojekwuas, Umar Pasha, and Archana Ramaswarmy.

The 2014 NT Shed Theatre cast featured Tendayi Jembere as 'Romeo' and Sheena Bhattessa as 'Juliet', with Vanessa Babirye, Joanna Burnett, Ashley Chin, Bunmi Mojekwu, Umar Pasha, and Mitesh Soni.

The 2017 NT Dorfman Theatre cast featured Nana Amoo-Gottfried as 'Romeo' and Sharan Phull as 'Juliet', with Madeline Appiah, Ashley Gerlach, Kayla Meikle, Ronak Patani, Jay Saighal, and Tripti Tripuraneni.

Directed by Bijan Sheibani with designs by Becs Andrews, lighting Paul Knott, music Soumik Datta, and sound Mike Winship.

The National Theatre's Shed Theatre was a temporary studio-style theatre that was erected in front of the NT South Bank home for use while the Cottesloe Theatre (now Dorfman Theatre) was having a major renovation and rebuild.

This was a National Theatre education production that toured schools, both before and after short seasons at the NT's London home.

The 2017 staging was filmed and has been released on DVD.


West End 2013 with Niall McNamee and Aruhan Galieva - Ambassadors Theatre

Previewed 25 September 2013, Opened 2 October 2013, Closed 29 November 2013 (in repertory) at the Ambassadors Theatre

Presented in an adaptation by Lolita Chakrabarti by the National Youth Theatre.

The cast featured Niall McNamee as 'Romeo' and Aruhan Galieva as 'Juliet', with Louisa Beadel, Miguel Brooking, Sope Dirisu, Sophie Ellerby, Aaron Gordon, Zaniab Hasan, James Laurence Hunter, Simon Lennon, Tom Prior, Abigail Rose, Anna Spearpoint, Tom Thompson, and Daisy Whalley.

Directed by Paul Roseby with sets by James Button, costumes by Richard Gellar, lighting by Ian Fincher, music by Tristan Parkes, and sound by Mick Livermore.

This adaptation was originally created for the BBC2 television documentary "When Romeo Met Juliet" (3 x 60 minute episodes) that was broadcast on Friday evenings, 4, 11 and 18 June 2010.


London 2015 with Samuel Valentine and Cassie Layton - Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

Opened 27 April 2015, Closed 8 May 2015 at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The cast featured Samuel Valentine as 'Romeo' and Cassie Layton as 'Juliet', with Matt Doherty, Steffan Donnelly, Steven Elder, Sarah Higgins, Tom Kanji, and Hannah McPake.

Directed by Dominic Dromgoole and Tim Hoare with designs by Andrew D Edwards, and music by Bill Barclay.

This was a small-scale Globe Theatre Education Production, performed by a small ensemble cast, which toured extensively during the year.


West End 2016 with James Mace and Shalisha James-Davis - Ambassadors Theatre

Previewed 20 September 2016, Opened 28 September 2016, Closed 23 November 2016 (in repertory) at the Ambassadors Theatre

Presented in an adaptation by Owen Horsley by the National Youth Theatre.

The cast featured James Mace as 'Romeo' and Shalisha James-Davis as 'Juliet', with Arianna Beadie, Seraphina Beh, Chinenye Ezeudu, Daisy Fairclough, Natasha Heliotis, Shiv Jalota, Michael Kinsey, Charlotte Law, Joshua Lyster-Downer, Felix Mackenzie-Barrow, Kwami Odoom, Joe Pierson, Nathaniel Wade, and Catrin Walker-Booth.

Directed by Kate Hewitt with movement by Polly Bennett, designs by Cecilia Carey, lighting by Elliot Griggs, and music and sound by Dom James and Tommy Antonio.


West End 2016 with Richard Madden, Lily James and Freddie Fox - Garrick Theatre

Previewed 12 May 2016, Opened 25 May 2016, Closed 13 August 2016 at the Garrick Theatre

Kenneth Branagh and Rob Ashford direct a major revival of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet in London starring Lily James and Richard Madden in the title roles.

The cast featured Richard Madden as 'Romeo', Freddie Fox as 'Romeo' from Tuesday 26 July 2016, and Lily James as 'Juliet', with Derek Jacobi as 'Mercutio', Ansu Kabia as 'Tybalt', Tom Hanson as 'Paris', Meera Syal as 'Nurse', Samuel Valentine as 'Friar Laurence', Chris Porter as 'Lord Montague', Zoe Rainey as 'Lady Montague', Michael Rouse as 'Lord Capulet', Marisa Berenson as 'Lady Capulet', Nikki Patel as 'Balthasar', Jack Colgrave Hirst as 'Benvolio', Matthew Hawksley as 'Anthony' / Friar John', Taylor James as 'Prince', Pip Jordan as 'Potpan', Rachael Ofori as 'Sampson' / 'Page', and Kathryn Wilder as 'Peter' / 'Apothecary'.

Lily James and Richard Madden recently starred as 'Cinderella' and 'Prince Kit' in Kenneth Branagh's live-action remake of Cinderella for Disney. Lily James' other credits include the role of Lady Rose in the BBC TV series Downton Abbey. Richard Madden played the role of 'Robb Stark' in the HBO TV series Game of Thrones. Kenneth Branagh's West End directing credits include William Shakespeare's Hamlet starring Jude Law in the title role (2009) and Hamish McColl and Sean Foley's Ducktastic! (2005).

Directed by Kenneth Branagh and Rob Ashford with designs by Christopher Oram, lighting by Howard Hudson, music by Patrick Doyle, and sound by Christopher Shutt.

Unfortuntely during the run Richard Madden, who was playing the role of 'Romeo', suffered am ankle injury. He was initially replaced by his understudy, Tom Hanson, but unfortunately he too then suffered a leg injury. Freddie Fox was then brought in to play the role and it was initially thought that Richard Madden would be able to recover enough to return to the production and 'share' the role with Fox during the last couple of weeks of the play's run, though very quickly it was deemed that Madden would not be able to recover sufficiently enough in time to rejoin the production, and therefore Fox effectively took over the role.

When this production opened here at the Garrick Theatre in May 2016, Ann Treneman in The Times thought that "this production by Kenneth Branagh's company may sound like Shakespeare but it looks like a Fellini film... Lily James is the absolute star here... Kenneth Branagh and his co-director Rob Ashford have shown a terrific attention to detail here, adding gestures, little asides, jokes that add meaning and make the whole production seem fresh... Still, with Christopher Oram's beautiful set, this production is gorgeous to look at. The final scene is stunning." Emma Brankine in The Sun hailed Lily James' "triumphant return to the theatre... This is Shakespeare with a silly, stroppy edge." Neil Norman in The Daily Express thought that, "modishly set on the cusp of the 1960s, it looks terrific... It is a pity the production does not match its framing architecture... The surprisingly pedestrian direction does not help. Branagh’s theatrical gifts appear to have deserted him here with actors addressing the audience like rank amateurs when they should be talking to each other." Alice Jones in The i Newspaper described it as a "star-laden but fatally leaden production... It all looks very stylish but it never feels authentic... Too often, it's played at a fever pitch. Everyone shouts, all of the time; emotions are signalled lavishly but feeling is thin on the ground," concluding that while Lily James is "a luminous heroine but even she cannot revive this production. A tale of woe, indeed." Michael Billington in The Guardian commented that "there are many ways of approaching Shakespeare’s youthful tragedy: Rob Ashford and Kenneth Branagh take the scenic route in this new production. We are plunged into a vividly imagined 1950s Italy of dark-suited men, petticoated women, bicycling friars, patriarchal oppression and frantic partying... But the production is staged with great fluency... There is also good work from a strong supporting cast... The whole thing is done with a speed and vigour that ensures we are never bored." Henry Hitchings in The London Evening Standard said that it is "a safe and old-fashioned account of Shakespeare's great portrait of 'star-crossed lovers'. There are some flashes of wit but it is often slow going and its chief redeeming feature is Lily James as Juliet... This interpretation is not romantic or deeply moving. Though it is stylish, accessible and illuminated by Lily James, it misses the passionate intensity of the tragedy." Quentin Letts for the Daily Mail wrote that "Sir Kenneth Branagh directs Shakespeare with a seriousness and opulence not much seen in British theatre at present. And in luminous Lily James he has found the perfect Juliet... She has the beauty of a Keira Knightley but buckets more stage ability and charm. Bravo." Ian Shuttleworth in The Financial Times explained that "there is, in short, a lot of casting baggage in evidence here. Which may be just as well, as there isn't a great deal of dynamism or passion on show in its own right. It may be time to say the hitherto unsayable: that although KennethBranagh is a pre-eminent actor and director, having largely made his reputation in Shakespeare, he’s not actually all that great shakes (no pun intended) at directing the Bard’s work... This is a conventional presentation only with reference to conventions now thoroughly outdated." Dominic Cavendish in The Daily Telegraph said that "Lily James is the damsel riding to the rescue of a West End production in distress... You feel the creative team were more interested in the picturesque over-view than detailed character work."

"Anyone who knows Lily James solely from War And Peace or Downton Abbey will be astounded by the maturity of her performance in Rob Ashford and Kenneth Branagh's production of Romeo And Juliet. Not only does she chart every step of Juliet's progression from champagne-swigging adolescent to self-possessed wife but her mastery of the verse is as remarkable as her mastery of the mood. Richard Madden's Romeo is virile and intense but prosaic, leaving James the undoubted star of this elegant, fast-moving but superficial production... Patrick Doyle's jarring music underscores and undercuts the action. The balcony scene is clumsily staged." The Sunday Express

"This new production from the Kenneth Branagh Theatre Company sparkles with two of the fairest stars in all telly heaven: Lily James as Juliet and Richard Madden as her Romeo... It's co-directed by Branagh and Rob Ashford, and the designer Christopher Oram has devised an austere, slightly fascistic set for the 1950s Verona setting... It's an entertaining production in many ways, with the comedy played up to the hilt - the light that shapes the shadow of the tragedy - and plenty of bold mucking around with the script... This is an efficient and good-looking production that comes nowhere near your heartstrings." The Sunday Times

"Images of stars glitter through Shakespeare’s youthful tragedy of terrible haste and pitiful waste. To which directors Sir Kenneth Branagh and Rob Ashford have added another cluster to their exuberant, monochrome, Fifties, Fellini-style, dolce vita staging... Derek Jacobi sparkles because his verse speaking is red-hot. But Lily James's Juliet dazzles. When she falls in love, a glowing, cartwheeling innocent finds focus and radiance, lit from within by an erotic passion she has never felt before. By contrast, Richard Madden's hunky Romeo is a low-voltage lover – even his voice sounds flat and strained... The story unravels with impressive clarity and terrific urgency on Christopher Oram's granite-and-pillar set... In a play filled with doom and gloom, stars blaze, none more brightly than Lily James." The Mail on Sunday

Romeo and Juliet in London at the Garrick Theatre previewed from 12 May 2016, opened on 25 May 2016 and closes on 13 August 2016.


London 2017 with Edward Hogg and Kirsty Bushell - Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

Previewed 22 April 2017, Opened 27 April 2017, Closed 9 July 2017 (in repertory) at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The cast featured Edward Hogg as 'Romeo' and Kirsty Bushell as 'Juliet', with Golda Rosheuvel as 'Mercutio', Ricky Champ as 'Tybalt', Tim Chipping as 'Paris', Blythe Duff as 'Nurse', Harish Patel as 'Friar Lawrence', Sian Martin as 'Lady Montague', Martina Laird as 'Lady Capulet', Gareth Snook as 'Lord Capulet', Jonathan Livingstone as 'Benvolio', Keith Gilmore as 'Escalus', Jac Adu-Sarkodie, Siobhan Athwal, and Keith Gilmore.

Directed by Daniel Kramer with choreography by Tim Claydon, designs by Soutra Gilmour, lighting by Charles Balfour, music by Ben de Vries, and sound by Paul Groothuis.


London 2018 with Bally Gill and Karen Fishwick - RSC Barbican Theatre

Previewed 2 November 2018, Opened 6 November 2018, Closed 19 January 2019 (in repertory) at the Barbican Theatre

The cast featured Bally Gill as 'Romeo' and Karen Fishwick as 'Juliet', with Charlotte Josephine as 'Mercutio', Raphael Sowole as 'Tybalt', Afolabi Alli as 'Paris', Ishia Bennison as 'Nurse', Andrew French as 'Friar Laurence', Paul Dodds as 'Lord Montague', Sakuntala Ramanee as 'Lady Montague', Michael Hodgson as 'Lord Capulet', Mariam Haque as 'Lady Capulet', Tom Padley as 'Balthasar', Josh Finan as 'Benvolio', Donna Banya as 'Gregory', Stevie Basaula as 'Sampson', Katy Brittain as 'Friar John' / 'Apothecary', Raif Clarke as 'Peter', Beth Cordingly as 'Escalus', John Macaulay as 'Cousin Capulet', and Nima Taleghani as 'Abraham'.

Directed by Erica Whyman with designs by Tom Piper, lighting by Charles Balfour, music by Sophie Cotton, and sound by Jeremy Dunn.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


London 2019 with Nathan Welsh and Charlotte Beaumont - Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

Opened 28 February 2019, Closed 23 March 2019 at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

An especially adapted version for young people presented as part of the Globe Theatre's Playing Shakespeare education series.

The cast featured Nathan Welsh as 'Romeo' and Charlotte Beaumont as 'Juliet', with Ned Derrington as 'Mercutio', Ayoola Smart as 'Tybalt', Christopher Chung as 'Paris' / 'Escalus', Debbie Chazen as 'Nurse' / 'Lady Montague', Jeff Alexander as 'Friar Laurence' / 'Lord Montague', Stuart Bowman as 'Lord Capulet', Hermione Gulliford as 'Lady Capulet', and Shalisha James-Davis as 'Benvolio'.

Directed by Michael Oakley.