Macbeth

Play by William Shakespeare. Unnatural forces feed the Macbeths' dark ambition in Shakespeare's savage thriller. Macbeth and Banquo, generals in the service of Duncan, King of Scotland, are returning victorious from battle when they are hailed by three witches who offer a prophesy. The first part of the prophesy is soon fulfilled and encouraged by this, and playing on her husband's ambition, Lady Macbeth persuades him to murder Duncan while he is a guest at their castle.

An anatomy of the relationship between ambition and corruption, this is one of Shakespeare's most bloody and fear-filled tragedies, the sstory of a man who murders king and comrade in his quest for the crown, only to lose it all. The play has the same resonance for today's audience as when it was first performed, reminding us that the aphrodisiac of power is as potent today as it has ever been.

1968 Aldwych Theatre with Paul Scofield and Vivien Merchant

1972 Old Vic Theatre (NT) with Anthony Hopkins and Diana Rigg

1975 Aldwych Theatre (RSC) with Nicol Williamson and Helen Mirren

1977 / 1978 Warehouse Theatre / Young Vic (RSC) with Ian McKellen and Judi Dench

1978 Olivier Theatre (NT) with Albert Finney and Dorothy Tutin

1980 Old Vic Theatre with Peter O'Toole and Frances Tomelty

1983 Cottesloe Theatre (NT) with Peter Needham and Yvonne Bryceland

1983 Barbican Theatre (RSC) with Bob Peck and Sara Kestelman

1987 Barbican Theatre (RSC) with Jonathan Pryce and Sinead Cusack

1987 Donmar Warehouse (Cheek by Jowl) with Keith Bartlett and Leslee Udwin

1989 Barbican Theatre (RSC) with Miles Anderson and Amanda Root

1991 Open Air Theatre with Peter Woodward and Nicola McAuliffe

1993 Olivier Theatre (NT) with Alan Howard and Anastasia Hille

1993 Barbican Theatre (RSC) with Derek Jacobi and Cheryl Campbell

1996 Barbican Theatre (RSC) with Roger Allam and Brid Brennan

1999 Queen's Theatre with Rufus Sewell and Sally Dexter

2001 Shakespeare's Globe Theatre with Jasper Britton and Eve Best

2003 Albery Theatre with Sean Bean and Samantha Bond

2005 Almeida Theatre with Simon Russell Beale and Emma Fielding

2005 Noel Coward Theatre (RSC) with Greg Hicks and Sian Thomas

2007 Gielgud Theatre with Patrick Stewart and Kate Fleetwood

2010 Shakespeare's Globe Theatre with Elliot Cowan and Laura Rogers

2012 Shakespeare's Globe Theatre with Michal Majnicz and Judyta Paradzinska

2013 Trafalgar Studios with James McAvoy and Claire Foy

2013 Shakespeare's Globe Theatre with Joseph Millson and Samantha Spiro

2015 Shakespeare's Globe Theatre with Ng Wai Shek and Rosa Maria Velasco

2016 Shakespeare's Globe Theatre with Ray Fearon and Tara Fitzgerald

2017 Dorfman Theatre (NT) with Nana Amoo-Gottfried and Madeline Appiah

Shakespeare's other plays seen recently on the London stage include All's Well That Ends Well, Antony and Cleopatra, As You Like It, The Comedy of Errors, Hamlet, Henry V, Julius Caesar, King Lear, Labour of Love, Love's Labour's Lost, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Much Ado About Nothing, Othello, Richard II, Richard III, Romeo and Juliet, The Taming of the Shrew, The Tempest, Twelfth Night, The Winter's Tale and Thomas More.

Adaptations and associated stage productions include Being Shakespeare, The Bomb-itty of Errors, The Boys From Syracuse, The Complete Works of Shakespeare (Abridged), Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Shakespeare In Love and West Side Story.


1968 Aldwych Theatre with Paul Scofield and Vivien Merchant

Opened 4 January 1968, Closed 10 April 1968 (in repertory) at the Aldwych Theatre

The cast featured Paul Scofield in the title role and Vivien Merchant as 'Lady Macbeth' with Sebastian Shaw as 'Duncan', Ian Richardson as 'Malcolm', Brewster Mason as 'Banquo' and Patrick O'Connell as 'Macduff'.

Directed by Peter Hall with sets by John Bury, costumes by Ann Curtis, lighting by John Bradley and music by Guy Woolfenden.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1972 Old Vic Theatre (NT) with Anthony Hopkins and Diana Rigg

Previewed 7 November 1972, Opened 9 November 1972, Closed 30 June 1973 (in repertory) at the Old Vic Theatre

The original cast featured Anthony Hopkins in the title role and Diana Rigg as 'Lady Macbeth' with Alan MacNaughtan as 'Duncan', Ronald Pickup as 'Malcolm', Denis Quilley as 'Banquo' and Gawn Grainger as 'Macduff'.

At the end of March there was a partial cast change with Denis Quilley taking over the title role, Jeremy Clyde as 'Malcolm', John Shrapnel as 'Banquo' and Paul Gregory as 'Malcolm'.

Directed by Michael Blakemore with movement by Karen Bell-Kanner, designs by Michael Annals, lighting by David Hersey, and music and sound by Marc Wilkinson.

Presented by the National Theatre.


1975 Aldwych Theatre (RSC) with Nicol Williamson and Helen Mirren

Previewed 4 March 1975, Opened 5 March 1975, Closed 29 March 1975 at the Aldwych Theatre

The cast featured Nicol Williamson in the title role and Helen Mirren as 'Lady Macbeth' with Frank Thornton as 'Duncan', Eric Allan as 'Malcolm', Gordon Jackson as 'Banquo' and Malcolm Tierney as 'Macduff'.

Directed by Trevor Nunn with designs by John Napier, lighting by Andy Phillips and music by Guy Woolfenden.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1977 / 1978 Warehouse Theatre / Young Vic (RSC) with Ian McKellen and Judi Dench

Previewed 5 August 1977, Opened 13 September 1977, Closed 18 February 1977 (in repertory) at the Warehouse Theatre (now Donmar Warehouse)
Transferred 4 April 1978, Closed 6 May 1978 at the Young Vic Theatre

The cast featured Ian McKellen in the title role and Judi Dench as 'Lady Macbeth' with Griffith Jones as 'Duncan', Roger Rees as 'Malcolm', John Woodvine as 'Banquo' and Bob Peck as 'Macduff'.

Directed by Trevor Nunn with designs by John Napier, lighting by Leo Leibovici and music by Guy Woolfenden.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1978 Olivier Theatre (NT) with Albert Finney and Dorothy Tutin

Previewed 27 May 1978, Opened 6 June 1978, Closed 13 January 1979 (in repertory) at the NT Olivier Theatre

The cast featured Albert Finney in the title role and Dorothy Tutin as 'Lady Macbeth' with Nicholas Selby as 'Duncan', Nicky Henson as 'Malcolm', Robin Bailey as 'Banquo' and Daniel Massey as 'Macduff'.

Directed by Peter Hall with designs and lighting by John Bury, music by Dominic Muldowney and sound by Julian Beech.

Presented by the National Theatre.


1980 Old Vic Theatre with Peter O'Toole and Frances Tomelty

Previewed 2 September 1980, Opened 3 September 1980, Closed 10 December 1980 at the Old Vic Theatre

The cast featured Peter O'Toole in the title role and Frances Tomelty as 'Lady Macbeth' with Bernard Archard as 'Duncan', Clive Wood as 'Malcolm', Brian Blessed as 'Banquo' and Dudley Sutton as 'Macduff'.

Directed by Bryan Forbes with designs by Keith Wilson and lighting by Brian Harris.

Presented by the Old Vic Theatre Company.

Despite notoriously terrible reviews, the audience flocked to see this production - the West End run at the Old Vic Theatre averaged 92 per cent over the 72 performances, and was thus a resounding financial success. Likewise, the short regional tour that followed was also very well attended. Full artistic control of the production was given to Peter O'Toole and the production was described as a 'full-blooded, old fashioned production in the tradition of Edmund Kean, the nineteenth-century tragedian'. The Artistic Director of the Old Vic Theatre, Timothy West, said at the time: "I think that possibly because Peter O'Toole and Bryan Forbes are people who work mostly in another medium they perhaps haven't quite kept pace with the way that classical theatre is moving."


1983 Cottesloe Theatre (NT) with Peter Needham and Yvonne Bryceland

Opened 16 May 1983, Closed 23 June 1983 (in repertory) at the NT Cottesloe Theatre (now Dorfman Theatre)

The cast featured Peter Needham in the title role and Yvonne Bryceland as 'Lady Macbeth' with Michael Beint, John Darrell, Roger Gartland, James Hayes, Greg Hicks, Derek Hollis, Janet Whiteside and Bev Willis.

Directed by Michael Bogdanov with Justin Greene and Alan Cohen.

Presented by the National Theatre as a NT Education Workshop touring production.


1983 Barbican Theatre (RSC) with Bob Peck and Sara Kestelman

Previewed 10 August 1983, Opened 16 August 1983, Closed 24 November 1983 (in repertory) at the Barbican Theatre

The cast featured Bob Peck in the title role and Sara Kestelman as 'Lady Macbeth' with David Waller as 'Duncan', Chris Hunter as 'Malcolm', Pete Postlethwaite as 'Banquo' and Malcolm Storry as 'Macduff'.

Directed by Howard Davies with sets by Chris Dyer, costumes by Poppy Mitchell, lighting by Howard Eaton and music by George Fenton.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1987 Barbican Theatre (RSC) with Jonathan Pryce and Sinead Cusack

Previewed 26 March 1987, Opened 1 April 1987, Closed 3 July 1987 (in repertory) at the Barbican Theatre

The cast featured Jonathan Pryce in the title role and Sinead Cusack as 'Lady Macbeth' with Alfred Burke as 'Duncan', Nicholas Woodeson as 'Malcolm', Hugh Quarshie as 'Banquo' and Peter Guinness as 'Macduff'.

Directed by Adrian Noble with designs by Bob Crowley, lighting by Mark Henderson and music by by Geoffrey Burgon.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1987 Donmar Warehouse (Cheek by Jowl) with Keith Bartlett and Leslee Udwin

Previewed 11 November 1987, Opened 16 November 1987, Closed 5 December 1987 at the Donmar Warehouse

The cast featured Keith Bartlett in the title role and Leslee Udwin as 'Lady Macbeth' with Des McAleer as 'Duncan', Timothy Walker as 'Malcolm', Raymond Sawyer' as 'Banquo', Des McAleer as 'Macduff'.

Directed by Declan Donnellan with designs by Nick Ormerod and lighting by Nick Kidd with Nick Ormerod.

Presented by Cheek By Jowl.


1989 Barbican Theatre (RSC) with Miles Anderson and Amanda Root

Previewed 27 April 1989, Opened 4 May 1989, Closed 31 August 1989 (in repertory) at the Barbican Theatre

The cast featured Miles Anderson in the title role and Amanda Root as 'Lady Macbeth' with Nicholas Selby as 'Duncan', Duncan Bell as 'Malcolm', Tony Armatrading as 'Banquo', Colin McCormack as 'Macduff'.

Directed by Adrian Noble with movement by Jane Gibson, designs by Bob Crowley, lighting by Mark Henderson with Chris Parry and Clive Morris, and music by Geoffrey Burgon.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1991 Open Air Theatre with Peter Woodward and Nicola McAuliffe

Previewed 24 May 1991, Opened 12 June 1991, Closed 3 September 1991 (in repertory) at the Open Air Theatre Regent's Park

The cast featured Peter Woodward in the title role and Nicola McAuliffe as 'Lady Macbeth' with Ian Mullins as 'Duncan', Guy Scantlebury as 'Malcolm', Bill Homewood as 'Banquo' and Keith Osborn as 'Macduff'.

Directed by William Gaunt with designs by Bruno Santini.

Presented by the Open Air Theatre.


1993 Olivier Theatre (NT) with Alan Howard and Anastasia Hille

Previewed 26 March 1993, Opened 1 April 1993, Closed 21 August 1993 (in repertory) at the NT Olivier Theatre

The cast featured Alan Howard in the title role and Anastasia Hille as 'Lady Macbeth' with Robin Bailey as 'Duncan', Simon Coates as 'Malcolm', Clive Wood as 'Banquo' and James Laurenson as 'Macduff'.

Directed by Richard Eyre with movement by Jane Gibson, designs by Bob Crowley, lighting by Jean Kalman, music by Dominic Muldowney and sound by Paul Groothuis.

Presented by the National Theatre.


1993 Barbican Theatre (RSC) with Derek Jacobi and Cheryl Campbell

Previewed 10 December 1993, Opened 16 December 1993, Closed 26 February 1994 (in repertory) at the Barbican Theatre

The cast featured Derek Jacobi in the title role and Cheryl Campbell as 'Lady Macbeth' with Denys Hawthorne as 'Duncan', Jason Durr as 'Malcolm', Christopher Ravenscroft as 'Banquo' and Michael Siberry as 'Macduff'.

Directed by Adrian Noble with designs by Ian Macneil, lighting by Alan Burrett and music by by David Bedford.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1996 Barbican Theatre (RSC) with Roger Allam and Brid Brennan

Previewed 31 October 1996, Opened 6 November 1996, Closed 27 March 1997 (in repertory) at the Barbican Theatre

The cast featured Roger Allam in the title role and Brid Brennan as 'Lady Macbeth' with Arthur Cox as 'Duncan', Sebastian Harcombe as 'Malcolm', Philip Quast as 'Banquo' and Colum Convey as 'Macduff'.

Directed by Tim Albery with designs by Stewart Laing and lighting by Mimi Jordan Sherin.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1999 Queen's Theatre with Rufus Sewell and Sally Dexter

Previewed 24 February 1999, Opened 3 March 1999, Closed 5 June 1999 at the Queen's Theatre in London

The cast featured Rufus Sewell in the title role and Sally Dexter as 'Lady Macbeth' with Simon Chandler as 'Duncan', Billy Carter as 'Malcolm', Martin Marquez as 'Banquo' and Declan Conlon as 'Macduff'.

Directed by John Crowley with sets by Jeremy Herbert, costumes by Laura Hopkins, lighting by Rick Fisher, and sound by John Owens and Fergus O'Hare

Presented by Thelma Holt and Karl Sydow.

"John Crowley's production is direct, fluent, pacey, but so spare that one wonders why Rufus Sewell's Macbeth covets its contents. On he stomps, like Mike Tyson entering the ring, a glowering, hoarse-voiced figure in faded black leather. He is so much the ambitious soldier that his first great soliloquy comes across not as a tussle with his conscience but a debate about his military preparedness... It is a bold, watchable but terribly narrow interpretation that is not deepened even by his bond with Sally Dexter. She is a sensual, at times almost feral, Lady Macbeth, given to rubbing at her breasts, her hips, her crotch and her husband; but, judging by the way she pushes him and he tugs at her hair, its basis is rough sex. No wonder, perhaps, that he is soon ignoring her and she has become a stiff, waxen near-zombie. Their bond is as unsentimentally handled as almost everything else... Maybe my eyes were affected by the murk, but I saw no jewel, no handover. You will find nothing rich or exotic in this neo-brutalist production." The Times

"All hail to this bold, brave project in the West End: a commercial production of the gory poetic shocker in which a young war hero and his tipsy queen bludgeon their way to the throne of blood and fall apart at the marital seams. Rufus Sewell and Sally Dexter are the criminal couple, and they are tremendous. Sewell's romantic good looks are matched by a parched, expressive voice. Once the killing starts, he sees daggers and visions at all corners, jumps at all noise, drifts away from his wife. Unusually, this monster has a musical soul and speaks accordingly. Meanwhile Miss Dexter's buxom Lady M hits the booze, turns rigid in a mauve gown at the banquet and finally retreats to her consoling fantasies in the dark castle at Dunsinane. This progress, with the mention of a lost baby opening painful emotional sores, is beautifully charted in John Crowley's production, which is full of sighs, rumbling, a creaking drawbridge and giant shadows... Sewell has a good gallows humour as he despatches a penultimate foe after emerging from the enclosing cage where the petty pace of life creeps in from day to day. The second half splutters a little. But the magic outweighs the misery. Mr Crowley is particularly good at eliding the scenes with a cross fade technique." The Daily Mail

"What on earth do Thelma Holt - one of the canniest, boldest, most valuable producers in theatre - and Karl Sydow think they are about in presenting the new West End Macbeth? Rufus Sewell, who has little experience in acting Shakespeare, is Macbeth; John Crowley, who has even less experience in directing Shakespeare, directs... It was predictable that neither Sewell nor Crowley - talented, important artists both - would be up to the job; and so it proves. Many of us who admire them both feel that it would have been kinder never to have thrown them into so perilous and exposed a venture... Sewell's voice is virile, dark, gravelly, and forceful; but it is also extremely limited, in range and timbre, and he delivers the lines as if he were forever trying to force it way beyond its capacity. As a result, he sounds frequently hoarse, and he compounds the damage by shouting about half the role... Even though he brings to Shakespeare bags of sincerity and energy, Sewell seems far more fatally inhibited and constricted by the verse than our super-skilled verse-speakers do. And Crowley has none of the experience to help Sewell show light within the unvaried darkness of his style, to find suspense within the pell-mell speed, to find delicacy within the relentless force... This is not a terrible Macbeth. It is merely a Macbeth in which nobody involved knows how to show why this is a great play. Sewell fans (of whom there are, rightly, many) will be disappointed by Shakespeare. Shakespeare fans (of whom there are more) will be, rightly, disappointed in Sewell." The Financial Times

Mabeth in London at the Queen's Theatre previewed from 24 February 1999, opened on 3 March 1999 and closed on 5 June 1999


2001 Shakespeare's Globe Theatre with Jasper Britton and Eve Best

Previewed 27 May 2001, Opened 5 June 2001, Closed 22 September 2001 (in repertory) at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The cast featured Jasper Britton in the title role and Eve Best as 'Lady Macbeth' with Terry McGinity as 'Duncan', Chu Omambala as 'Malcolm', Patrick Brennan as 'Banquo' and Liam Brennan as 'Macduff'.

Directed by Tim Carroll with choreography by Sian Williams, designs by Laura Hopkins and music by Claire van Kampen.

Presented by the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre.

"Critics have complained that the populist Globe Theatre lacks 'conceptual' interpretations (as if we didn't have enough of those already, thanks all the same). Well, Tim Carroll's production is as conceptual as you like, but to very good effect. The witches' chants are done to jazz and rap rhythms. Blood flows in the form of golden tinsel. Killings are signified by the throwing of pebbles into pails. Stones in their buckets, you might say. Such devices make you listen to the text anew, and in Jasper Britton and Eve Best as the murderous Macbeths we have two of the most talented and watchable young actors around." The Daily Mail

"Like the rest of the cast, the three witches, with their shattered specs, are in black tie. The programme makes the good point that Macbeth is a celebrated warrior, but in this stylised account, with its jazz and diagrammatic groupings on bentwood chairs, Jasper Britton's Macbeth looks as though he's emerged from nothing more stressful than the first half of a production at Glyndebourne. There's an impressive creepy integrity to the almost abstract concept Carroll has created here, and some genuinely unnerving moments, as when Eve Best's glamorous Lady Macbeth sleepwalks on a dangling marble slab that tilts under her tread. But the emotional temperature is too cool throughout. Britton gives a deeply intelligent performance, but like this Macbeth as a whole, it remains too cerebral." The Independent

"It's a black-tie affair, with lots of jazz and jazzy choreography and with the witches kitted out in the same Moss Bros style as everyone else. Characters clamber over chairs and perform on a table suspended in mid-air. Deaths are signalled by stones being tossed into buckets. The banquet at which Banquo's ghost appears may be described as 'a solemn supper', but the guests wear silly paper hats, and Lady Macbeth shrieks out her farewell to them while she lies writhing on the floor. Jasper Britton's Macbeth offers glimpses of the intelligent performance he might have given under more favourable conditions, but it is an evening of tricks and gimmicks, signifying very little." The Sunday Telegraph

"This is one of the most witless and pretentious productions of this play, indeed of any Shakespeare play, I've ever seen. Everyone is in evening dress, and the music is softcore 1950s jazz. Shakespeare can take such things. But Tim Carroll's production is like a schoolboy's spoof of an old Pinewood B feature... Macbeth (Jasper Britton), smooth and affable, hears of the fulfilment of their prophecy as if it were good news from the stock exchange, and contemplates Duncan's murder like a hostile takeover bid. He deflates some of the greatest speeches with bland understatement or funny voices. Lady M (Eve Best) goes around like a dreary nightclub hostess who fancies herself as a socialite. Evil? Terror? Forget it. A send-up by the Reduced Shakespeare Company would at least be funny, and a lot shorter. In my dreams! This production is a piece of worthless, arrogant rubbish." The Sunday Times

Mabeth in London at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre previewed from 27 May 2001, opened on 5 June 2001 and closed on 22 September 2001 (in repertory)


2003 Albery Theatre with Sean Bean and Samantha Bond

Previewed 7 November 2002, Opened 14 November 2002, Closed 1 March 2003 at the Albery Theatre (now Noel Coward Theatre) in London

The cast featured Sean Bean in the title role and Samantha Bond as 'Lady Macbeth' with Julian Glover as 'Duncan', Adrian Schiller as 'Malcolm', Barnaby Kay as 'Banquo' and Mark Bazeley as 'Macduff'.

Directed by Edward Hall with movement by Ian Spink, designs by Michael Pavelka, lighting by Ben Ormerod, music by Simon Slater and sound by Matt McKenzie.

Presented by Sonia Friedman Prodcutions, Old Vic Productions, Mark Rubinstein and TEG Productions.

The last time they worked together she was Miss Moneypenny and he was 007's enemy 006 in the James Bond movie Goldeneye. But in their latest joint endeavour Samantha Bond and Sean Bean discover there is no such thing as a licence to kill. As the misguided Macbeths, they equip themselves with distinction while leading us through Shakespeare's macabre journey into hell and murderous madness. Nowadays Bean is known for his TV drama roles... but in the West End, he went back to his classically-trained roots. I thought that at times he failed to capture the necessary cruelty inherent in Macbeth's craven character. He preferred to portray a decent man led astray. But as the chaos caused by his vile crimes derail him, Bean's Macbeth succeeds in dominating Edward Hall's production. Miss Bond also took time to come into her own. As the woeful wife unravels and plummets into suicidal lunacy, Samantha proves she is capable of more than casting doe-eyes at 007... For all its unevenness and occasional tendency towards pop video garishness, this Macbeth had me on the edge of my seat. As Macbeth's slayer Macduff, Mark Bazeley was a revelation. His tears on learning of the slaughter of his family provoked mine." The Daily Mirror

Though it reads so thrillingly on the page, Macbeth succeeds remarkably rarely on stage... So it is a relief, as well as a pleasure, to report that Sean Bean acquits himself remarkably well in the role, especially since it is 13 years since the actor, best known as the eponymous star of the television series Sharpe, and as Boromir in The Lord of the Rings, last trod the boards. He finds himself in one of the best productions I have ever seen of the play, directed with a wealth of bright ideas and a real instinct for theatrical excitement by Edward Hall, son of Sir Peter. And Samantha Bond proves once again that M's secretary in the Bond movies is also one of the finest classical actresses of her generation. The piece is staged in modern military dress, which makes a bit of a nonsense of all the excellent sword fight routines, but we'll let that pass... All credit to Hall & Co. In this gripping, hurtling-paced production, the curse of Macbeth has been lifted." The Daily Telegraph

"I have seen quite a few worse productions of this difficult play, but the current account is still a crude and disappointing venture from a director of the calibre of Edward Hall... The setting here is the bombed-out ruins of some unspecified Balkan-style region. With his craggy, virile demeanour, Sean Bean certainly looks the part of the warrior, but his unvaried, four-square delivery of the speeches suggest an uncomplicated Yorkshire lad whose most insomnia-inducing idea of terror is the Sheffield United football team getting thrashed... It's just too unsubtle to have Samantha Bond - who could be a first-rate Lady Macbeth - read out her husband's letter while lingering on their double bed. The sexuality of this couple is vital to the meaning of the play, because it has, for some reason, had to be channelled into the desire for power. But you don't convey this by suggesting that their erotic life could be an example to us all. The best performance comes from Mark Bazeley as Macduff, who gives you an electrifying portrayal of the character's torment at hearing news of the murder of his family and of his dismay when, in Hall's shrewd interpretation of the last scene, masked gunmen arrest the prospective earls - indicating that the new King Malcolm's regime may not be much healthier than Macbeth's... Sean Bean's screen credits may assure the production's success. But it doesn't give you the desired balance between the warrior and the poet, the killer and the sensitive metaphysician. It's nobody's finest hour." The Independent

Mabeth in London at the Albery Theatre (now Noel Coward Theatre) previewed from 7 November 2002, opened on 14 November 2002 and closed on 1 March 2003


2005 Almeida Theatre with Simon Russell Beale and Emma Fielding

Previewed 13 January 2005, Opened 20 January 2005, Closed 5 March 2005 at the Almeida Theatre

The cast featured Simon Russell Beale in the title role and Emma Fielding as 'Lady Macbeth' with William Gaunt as 'Duncan', Tom Burke as 'Malcolm', Silas Carson as 'Banquo' and Paul Higgins as 'Macduff'.

Directed by John Caird with designs by Christopher Oram, lighting by Neil Austin and sound by John Leonard.

Presented by the Almeida Theatre.

"Simon Russell Beale may not have done enough film or television to be a household name, but he is widely hailed as one of the greatest stage actors of his generation. He has the rare knack of making you think a role must have been written specially for him. That would be a tall order for the Scottish play, 400 years old this year. Nevertheless, his eagerly awaited Macbeth is a disappointment. He has flashes of greatness as the tyrannical Scottish king drenched in the blood of his enemies. He is mesmerising when he persuades two disenchanted peasants to murder his former friend and ally, Banquo, and he brings a memorable quiet madness to Macbeth's last lonely hours in his fortress at Dunsinane. The problem is that he does not convince us early on that he is a victorious general, the hero of the hour as Scotland fights the Norwegians... Emma Fielding as wicked Lady M does not do much to spur him on. These Macbeths have so little chemistry, and she has such little drive, that you can scarcely imagine her persuading her husband to wear a vest, let alone kill the king. Laid on such poor foundations, it is hard for the production to build itself up... There are plenty of good performances, notably from William Gaunt as a teary Duncan, Tom Burke as his dashing son Malcolm, and from Sarah Powell, who is impressive in her brief scene as the doomed Lady Macduff. But John Cairns' cold production, on designer Christopher Oram's near-empty stage, is clearly relying on the central performance to carry the show, which sadly it doesn't." The Daily Express

"In John Caird's quietly intense, if too slowly paced, production, Simon Russell Beale seems to be as much in his element with the part as a haggis on Burns' Night... Brilliantly filling in the gaps on what it is about their marriage that makes the Macbeths so murderously responsive to temptation, Russell Beale and the splendid Emma Fielding show you a couple who have fallen into the co-dependency trap after the death of their baby. You feel that they love, but do not like, one another and that the relationship has a hermetic, stifling quality because they are ill-at-ease in courtly circles and lack the safety valve of friends. He wants the crown for her, she for him - a ghastly crossed-wires situation which is bound to lead to desperate recriminations afterwards... Not a great production, but a masterly Macbeth." The Independent

"Why is this the most powerful, chilling, evil-feeling Macbeth we've seen since McKellen and Dench performed the play (RSC 1977) for Trevor Nunn? It has something to do with the intimacy of the Almeida, with its black pockmarked back wall, and something with the dark, haunted Scotland John Caird's admirable simple, lucid production evokes. But it has most to do with Simon Russell Beale with his stealthy vowels, echoing silences and infinite inwardness. From the first, people seem not to trust his quiet, withdrawn Macbeth. William Gaunt's tougher-than-usual Duncan flinches from him, sensing his danger, and Silas Carson's Banquo is quick to see through him. More importantly, Russell Beale does not trust himself. He acknowledges his impulses with dread, submits to them half-knowing the consequences, and watches himself destroying himself in a long suicide of the soul. A double suicide, of course, since Emma Fielding's Lady Macbeth, superficially so strong and collected, kills herself after a sleepwalking scene memorably packed with anguish." The Times

Mabeth in London at the Almeida Theatre previewed from 13 January 2005, opened on 20 January 2005 and closed on 5 March 2005


2005 Noel Coward Theatre (RSC) with Greg Hicks and Sian Thomas

Previewed 10 February 2005, Opened 16 February 2005, Closed 5 March 2005 at the Noel Coward Theatre

The cast featured Greg Hicks in the title role and Sian Thomas as 'Lady Macbeth' with Richard Cordery as 'Duncan', Pal Aron as 'Malcolm', Louis Hilyer as 'Banquo' and Clive Wood as 'Macduff'.

Directed by Dominic Cooke with movement by Liz Ranken, sets by Robert Innes Hopkins, costumes by Tania Spooner, lighting by Peter Mumford, music by Gary Yershon and sound by Andrea J Cox.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.

"Macbeth has always worked best as a fast-paced thriller, and as the production which launches new RSC boss Michael Boyd's ambition to get back to a semi-permanent ensemble company, it flows smoothly enough, despite one or two problems in the casting. The main one is that in the title role Greg Hicks is thoughtful but surprisingly lightweight, so that when troubles first come he seems to be having a hissy fit rather than a serious breakdown. Sian Thomas as Lady Macbeth is so reminiscent of Margaret Thatcher that I even began to wonder if the drama would in fact work better with her taking the lead . But Hicks grows in stature as he crumbles in kingship, so that by the final battle he is indeed powerful enough... At worst, the production is somewhat un-involving, lacking in the requisite black magic, but it drives its way through with immense power while showcasing what this new company can achieve as a whole. In that sense, it is in stark contrast to the starrier RSC shows of recent years, where the supporting cast was just that. Now they are themselves the stars, and that of course is what the RSC was always meant to be about. The Daily Express

"An absolutely bog-standard RSC production on the point of death. It has every symptom - long military overcoats, Ruritanian king-wear, manly roars and manly hugs, bawdy pelvic thrusts, a spooky raking light, stupid fanfares, subfusc costume varied by completely random items of colour, continuous dry-ice. The speeches are puffed and chanted and gabbled. The actors troop on, assemble in a rough arc, stand there, and troop off in an orderly manner... The acting resorts to defensive/desperate self-parody, with extravagantly meaningless gesture from Sian Thomas, unintelligible stresses and pauses from Greg Hicks. Those thrilling panicky starts and fidgets in their dialogue are all smothered. It's good when, off to murder, Macbeth has to push his whole body weight very slowly against the great door at the back of the set, and as it opens bright light pours out of it. But the cast is bored. They know it's hopeless. They're just mucking about. You may say it was only ever meant for tourists and school-parties who will know no better, but it won't do." The Sunday Telegraph

"Part of the RSC's Tragedies season, orchestrated under the guidance of the new artistic director, Michael Boyd, Dominic Cooke's interval-free production chases relevance in a world of political corruption, leadership struggles, terror tactics and needless conflicts... The whole production seems too clean, from the flat, school-play castle-wall set to the curious choice of first world war style military costume... In the quest to grab relevance, you might as well put your money where your mouth is and set the whole thing in modern-day LA. This generic militarism feels like a halfway house, modern dress for the sake of it. It feels lukewarm. It's not the only thing. Admittedly, Greg Hicks's Macbeth is deliberately weak: too feeble to shake off an idea once it's lodged in his head, and so insecure about his manhood that it can be undermined by his wife... Except for the deep-red blood dripping impressively off his hands after Duncan's slaughter, however, he lacks vivid colour. Sian Thomas's Lady Macbeth, meanwhile, is exactly like Lady Macbeth, with all the breast-clutching, glowering sexuality and mad hair anyone could desire. She gets herself unsexed and attacks damned spots with a stirring grandeur, but it's never quite startling, never strange enough. The rest of the cast are equally fine. This is Marks & Spencer Shakespeare - indisputably high-quality ready meals, but unlikely to take you off into Michelin-starred delight." The Sunday Times

Mabeth in London at the Noel Coward Theatre previewed from 10 February 2005, opened on 16 February 2005 and closed 5 March 2005


2007 Gielgud Theatre with Patrick Stewart and Kate Fleetwood

Previewed 24 September 2007, Opened 26 September 2007, Closed 1 December 2007 at the Gielgud Theatre

The cast featured Patrick Stewart in the title role and Kate Fleetwood as 'Lady Macbeth' with Paul Shelley as 'Duncan', Scott Handy as 'Malcolm', Michael Turner as 'Banquo' and Michael Feast as 'Macduff'.

Directed by Rupert Goold with movement by Georgina Lamb, designs by Anthony Ward, video by Lorna Heavey, lighting Howard Harrison, and music and sound by Adam Cork.

A transfer from the Chichester Festival Theatre.

"It amazes me that Patrick Stewart and Kate Fleetwood give such fine performances when (for instance) one is required to uncork and pour wine for his guests during a major soliloquy and the other to dive and quake beneath a trolley just after Duncan's murder. It's all gloriously inventive. Expect unsettling figures, including the blood-boltered Banquo, to emerge from the sinister industrial lift at the back... But Goold's production is more notable for fitful brilliance than for consistency of approach or fidelity to the text's demands. Yet maybe we should blame Shakespeare, not Goold, if we can't fully understand why Fleetwood, at first as splendidly fearsome a Lady Macbeth as I've seen, ends up washing her hands with bleach beneath a tap spouting blood. The hints of vulnerability in between can't explain so huge a transition. As for Stewart... It's a remarkable performance: sucessively wry, watchful, grieving, angry, astonished, agonised, dangerous, exhausted, bitter, nihilistic. But the suggestion that he's another Stalin is another example of over-clever direction. Stewart is a lot more interesting than that." The Times

"A modern production of Shakespeare's tragedy is taking the West End by storm after a raving by the critics. It is the scariest, creepiest, most exciting event on the London stage in ages... It stars Patrick Stewart of Star Trek fame, who goes through the Scottish play like a dose of salts. No less good is his Lady Macbeth, a raven-haired psycho played by the glamorous Kate Fleetwood. But the stars are just part of the reason to see the show. It's the sheer power of the play that is so striking. The story looms at you out of the darkness, like a dripping dagger, and never lets up. There are moments when, like in all good horror films, you laugh nervously just to remind yourself it's not real. The set is a kitchen or a possibly a grubby, white-tiled abattoir. The witches are disguised as the sort of vicious nurses you absolutely do not want in the NHS. People come and go via a sinister service lift. When the doors slide open you wonder what on earth's coming out next... The use of fear has of course never gone out of fashion, making Macbeth and his descent from hero to tyrant as applicable as ever... It's a reminder, too, that Shakespeare, when you do him right, is still our sharpest contemporary commentator." The Daily Express

"Those who know Patrick Stewart best as Professor Xavier from the X-Men movies or Star Trek's Captain Jean-Luc Picard may not be aware of his classical pedigree. He was a major star with the Royal Shakespeare Company long before being wooed by Hollywood. Which is why he slipped back effortlessly into Shakespearean roles after making a welcome return home. But no matter what stage triumphs litter his past career, Stewart hits new professional heights with his portrayal of the murderous Thane of Cawdor. Director Rupert Goold's electrifying production is located in Stalinist Russia. The mesmerising Stewart is so accomplished he makes and eats a ham sandwich while delivering a vital speech. And he inspires terrific performances, too, from his Lady Macbeth (Kate Fleetwood) and the three weird witches... It's the most exciting slice of Shakespeare I've ever seen. Catch it if you can." The Sun

Mabeth in London at the Gielgud Theatre previewed from 24 September 2007, opened on 26 September 2007 and closed on 1 December 2007


2010 Shakespeare's Globe Theatre with Elliot Cowan and Laura Rogers

Previewed 23 April 2010, Opened 29 April 2010, Closed 27 June 2010 (in repertory) at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The cast featured Elliot Cowan in the title role and Laura Rogers as 'Lady Macbeth' with James Clyde as 'Duncan', James McArdle as 'Malcolm', Christian Bradley as 'Banquo' and Keith Dunphy as 'Macduff'.

Directed by Lucy Bailey with choreography by Javier De Frutos, designs by Katrina Lindsay and music by Orlando Gough.

Presented by the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre.

"In the title role, Elliot Cowan has a remarkable physical presence. It's wholly convincing that, as we're told before we see him, he could have 'carved out his passage' through the carnage of the battlefield. He's virile and menacing, and his relationship with Lady Macbeth (Laura Rogers) is charged with combustible sexuality. Where Cowan convinces less is in his verse-speaking. There are some pleasing details, yet he fails to persuade us of Macbeth's descent into the abyss of madness, and there's a nagging feeling that his diction could be better - as though he's recovering from a cold. Rogers is effective as the cool manipulator who inspires Macbeth's bloody craving for power, but her collapse in the later stages disappoints. And while there's solid work in supporting roles, Keith Dunphy's Macduff lacks the 'noble passion' the text specifies. This is a production full of nice touches. It's at times disturbing, and a couple of scenes are very funny. However, humour seeps into areas where it has no place, and some of the pathos and power of the play's closing phase are lost. The Globe Theatre's space is used well and the imagination Bailey and designer Katrina Lindsay have brought to it provides some beguiling moments. Yet the inventiveness is fitful, and the second half sags. We're entertained, but not mesmerised." The London Evening Standard

"To enter the Globe is to get quite a shock. The stage has been extended into the theatre's well, becoming a vast blackcloth with slits through which the heads of groundlings protrude, giving the impression that they have been decapitated by a battalion of Salomes. The hint of violence is apt, because blood-streaked soldiers appear through openings beside them, followed by three cackling witches with marked necrophiliac tastes. Corpses appear more often than usual in Lucy Bailey's production, and these women crouch beside them, slavering and licking their gore... Scotland's soldiery, clothed in period chain mail, is loud and menacing. The fighting, with the surprising exception of that between Macbeth and Macduff, is fierce. And Elliot Cowan's Macbeth is impressively monstrous by the end... He is variously wary, restless, excitable, jumpy, desperate, formidable and sweatily, scarily nihilistic. You believe that, as he says, his mind teems with scorpions and that, as he also says, he has to harden to survive. There's the production's central irony, for Laura Rogers's Lady Macbeth has encouraged regicide by calling Macbeth less than a man, only to find that the man she creates frightens, alienates and destroys her... Oh, and Frank Scantori's Porter is a bloated troll who throws what is supposed to be his urine at the groundlings. They duck and gasp. I was content just to nod, in appreciation at maybe the strongest opener to a Globe season I have seen." The Times

"Hell is ever present in Lucy Bailey's evocative new staging of Macbeth. Katrina Lindsay's set draws on Gustav Doré's illustrations for Dante's Divine Comedy. A huge black canopy spreads across the Globe courtyard, dotted with holes through which spectators slot their heads, like the damned souls trapped in the lowest circle of Hell. As prologue to the play, bloody bodies surge up through the canopy and writhe in agony, while the weird sisters busy themselves below - plenty of hurly-burly beneath the blanket. It is playful, original and powerful. Bailey's staging seizes on the circular nature of the Globe to suggest that we are all trapped in this hellish tale of spiralling ambition... Elliot Cowan is a strapping, handsome Macbeth: he brings vigour and charisma to the part but also conveys the torment of an unquiet mind. Laura Rogers starts less strongly but is deeply affecting in the sleepwalking scene. The production is flecked with imaginative touches... Not all of them work - the ghost of Banquo emerging from the banquet is a bit Hammer Horror. More importantly, what eludes the staging is a real chill and a sense of the horror closing in round Macbeth, and the pace sags dangerously in the second half. But still, this brooding production launches the new season strongly. And no one will forget Frank Scantori's grotesque porter, who brings a new meaning to the phrase "comic relief'." The Financial Times

Mabeth in London at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre previewed from 23 April 2010, opened on 29 April 2010 and closed on 27 June 2010 (in repertory)


2012 Shakespeare's Globe Theatre with Michal Majnicz and Judyta Paradzinska

Opened 8 May 2012, Closed 10 May 2012 at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The cast featured Michal Majnicz in the title role and Judyta Paradzinska as 'Lady Macbeth' with Grzegorz Minkiewicz as 'Duncan', Adam Ciolek as 'Malcolm', Przemyslaw Kozlowski as 'Banquo' and Miroslaw Bednarek as 'Macduff'.

Directed by Maja Kleczewska with lighting by Piotr Pawlik and music by Waldemar Wróblewski.

Performed in Polish by Teatr im. Kochanowskiego, from Opole, Poland.

Presented by the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre as part of the 2012 Globe to Globe Festival.


2013 Trafalgar Studios with James McAvoy and Claire Foy

Previewed 9 February 2013, Opened 19 February 2013, Closed 27 April 2013 at the Trafalgar Studio 1

The cast featured James McAvoy in the title role and Claire Foy as 'Lady Macbeth' with Hugh Ross as 'Duncan', Mark Quartley as 'Malcom', Forbes Masson as 'Banquo' and Jamie Ballard as 'Macduff'.

Directed by Jamie Lloyd with movement Director Ann Yee, designs by Soutra Gilmour, lighting Designer Adam Silverman, and music and sound Alex Baranowski.

Presented by the Jamie Lloyd Company as part of the 2013 'Trafalgar Transformed' season.


2013 Shakespeare's Globe Theatre with Joseph Millson and Samantha Spiro

Previewed 22 June 2013, Opened 2 July 2013, Closed 13 October 2013 (in repertory) at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The cast featured Joseph Millson in the title role and Samantha Spiro as 'Lady Macbeth' with Gawn Grainger as 'Duncan', Phil Cumbus as 'Malcolm', Billy Boyd as 'Banquo' and Stuart Bowman as 'Macduff'.

Directed by Eve Best with choreography by Charlotte Broom and Sian Williams, designs by Mike Britton and music by Olly Fox.

Presented by the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre.

"This is one of the funniest productions of 'The Scottish Play' I've seen... Macbeth is littered with jarring lines which actors must speak at moments of extreme emotion. Witness Macbeth and wife trying to busk innocence when the king Duncan is discovered slaughtered at their house party ("What, inmy house?" says Lady M, with middle-class horror). As a director you either try to gloss over such moments, or embrace the gallows humour and make a virtue of it. The latter is Best's approach, and by and large it is successful. But there is a cost... Sometimes we find ourselves laughing where we should be carried away by the blood-and-guts narrative. But this is a fresh, intelligent examination of Shakespeare's awkward, uneven script and should divide opinion strongly." The Sunday Telegraph

In between all the scheming and the slaughtering, the plotting and the paranoia, sometimes it's hard to remember that Lord and Lady Macbeth were ever - what's the word? - ordinary... At the Globe Theatre in London, it's Joseph Millson and Samantha Spiro starring in Eve Best's utterly absorbing, unusually amusing staging, which shows us a loving couple whose souls blacken as marriage frays. When Malcolm decries them as a 'dead butcher' and a 'fiend-like queen' at the end, we know just how inadequate his words are for these greedy, ruthless, vulnerable opportunists. Best's production is awake to irony, but it's not gimmicky, despite the odd tweaked or added line and despite a banquet scene that takes tragedy close to farce. And they make that almost Fawlty Towers-ish scene exciting rather than risible because Millson and Spiro root their extreme behaviour in the painful choices they made in order to seize power... They give performances to relish of clarity and intimacy. Mike Britton's Elizabethan design appears at first too bland, but in tandem with Olly Fox's Scottish folk music the tension evolves slowly... Best is a fine, daring actor who looks set to be a fine, daring director. She makes sure that all her cast evolve, whether it's Philip Cumbus's Malcolm going awkwardly from fop to figurehead or Stuart Bowman's gruff Macduff turning vengeful. And she uses the space cannily, venturing away from the stage so that the characters enclose us in their ambition and desperation. This Journey to the dark side has rarely been so refreshing." The Times

"At Shakespeare's Globe Theatre in London they have come up with a production from debutant director Eve Best. Miss Best is one of our great actresses but is she any cop on the other side of the stage?... Samantha Spiro is Lady Macbeth. Miss Spiro is normally cast in gushier roles and she starts like that. Then we see ambition and greed take grip. Macbeth is played self-consciously by Joseph Millson. He is tall and handsome in a male-model way, but Macbeth's political hesitation comes across as wetness and is not balanced by enough of the swashbuckling warrior. His 'tomorrow and tomorrow' speech is overly mannered, beset by so many thespy checks and delays that it lacks rhythm... Maybe this is a Globe thing. The outdoor audiences here are always determined to have a jolly time and that can complicate the task of the tragedian. It is unusual to have an audience laugh at Banquo's ghost scene. How the groundlings giggled as Macbeth searched under the banqueting table to check that the ghost was not there. There may well have been tourists who left this production thinking Macbeth was a comedy. That's a first. We must give Miss Best that. But she should perhaps stick to the acting." The Daily Mail

Macbeth in London at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre previewed from 22 June 2013, opened on 2 July 2013 and closed on 13 October 2013 (in repertory)


2015 Shakespeare's Globe Theatre with Ng Wai Shek and Rosa Maria Velasco

Opened 17 August 2015, Closed 23 August 2015 at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The cast featured Ng Wai Shek in the title role and Rosa Maria Velasco as 'Lady Macbeth' with Chang Wing Chuen, Lo Chun Ho, Yuen Fu Wah, Wong Siu Fai Masu, Ata Wong Chun Tat, Tang Chi Kin, Guthrie Yip, Wong Kwok Kei, Cheng Ka Chun, Franky McNugget, Leung Pui Yee Amanda and Chan Ting Hin Henry.

Directed by Tang Shu-wing with sets by Chan Chi Kuen Ricky, costumes by Tam Ka Yee and music by Heidi Wai Yee Chan.

Performed in Cantonese by the Tang Shu-wing Theatre Studio from Hong Kong.

Presented, in a co-commissioned with Hong Kong Arts Festival, by the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre as part of the 2015 Globe to Globe Festival.


2016 Shakespeare's Globe Theatre with Ray Fearon and Tara Fitzgerald

Previewed 18 June 2016, Opened 23 June 2016, Closed 1 October 2016 (in repertory) at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The cast featured Ray Fearon in the title role and Tara Fitzgerald as 'Lady Macbeth' with Sam Cox as 'Duncan', Freddie Stewart as 'Malcolm', Jermaine Dominique as 'Banquo' and Jacob Fortune-Lloyd as 'Macduff'.

Directed by Iqbal Khan with movement by Coral Messam, sets and lighting by Ciaran Bagnall, costumes by Joan O'Clery and music by Jocelyn Pook.

Presented by the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre.

"The Globe has reinvigorated Shakespeare's comedies this season, but the Scottish tragedy flounders in Iqbal Khan's production: it's crammed with underworked ideas. The play shows how an ardent concern for the future produces a bloody here and now, so prophesy is a burning issue... A blind old man occasionally wanders over the stage, while a solemn small boy appears, mostly visible to the Macbeths alone. They play tiddlywinks with their imaginary heir, give him a piggyback; he seems to represent both their dead child and the mockery of all human hopes. The murderous couple, though strongly cast, perform in jarringly different registers. Ray Fearon's resonant, anguished thane rarely connects with Tara Fitzgerald's lady, who is husky, humorous, matter of fact... Everything unravels after their coronation — they emerge from the back of the stage in a puff of hell-mouth smoke to what sounds like a dragon's growl, but take their own separate paths to torment." The Sunday Times

"A funeral dirge marks time on Macbeth's blood-soaked bid for power from the moment the wretched figures of the most famous witches in the English language reveal themselves. The contorted trio, wreathed in severed body parts, send a chill through the air. A palpable sense of foreboding fills the theatre as Ray Fearon's Macbeth and Tara Fitzgerald's Lady Macbeth start to give in to their ruthless ambitions. Their sexual chemistry makes the early scenes feel like foreplay as Lady Macbeth seduces her once noble husband into killing his king, Duncan... Many still believe the 'Scottish Play' to be cursed, but this powerful version is a blessing." The Sunday Mirror

"Staging Macbeth at the Globe Theatre is no easy task. The evening sunlight and aircraft noise all undermine the intense, claustrophobic and pitch-black spell the play needs to cast. And with this latest one, director Iqbal Khan's 'inventive' production, in which we get four weird sisters all waving dismembered body parts, doesn't help. Ray Fearon's macho Macbeth looks the part but lacks conviction and any chemistry with his missus. Tara Fitzgerald's drippy, social-worker Lady Macbeth is largely inaudible, and Sam Cox's King Duncan can't say a line without throwing his arms up and grinning like an escaped lunatic. His murder is a huge relief... I rather liked Banquo's ghost (a low-tech job involving a rubber sheet), and Nadia Albina's female Porter is lively. But do we really need Donald Trump jokes? Here Shakespeare's shortest tragedy is a comedy stretched out to three hours. Except that it feels like four." The Mail on Sunday

Macbeth in London at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre previewed from 18 June 2016, opened on 23 June 2016 and closed on 1 October 2016 (in repertory)


2017 Dorfman Theatre (NT) with Nana Amoo-Gottfried and Madeline Appiah

Opened 6 February 2017, Closed 20 February 2017 (in repertory) at the Dorfman Theatre

The cast featured Nana Amoo-Gottfried in the title role and Madeline Appiah as 'Lady Macbeth' with Ashley Gerlach as 'Duncan', Ronak Patani as 'Malcolm', Kayla Meikle as 'Banquo' and Jay Saighal as 'Macduff'.

Directed and adapted by Justin Audibert with designs by Lucy Sierra, lighting by Paul Knott, music by Jonathan Girling and sound by Mike Winship.

Presented by the National Theatre as part of the NT Education Program.