London Theatre Breaks

The Gruffalo's Child

This show has now closed, click here for a listing of current and future London shows

Children's Show from 28 November 2007 to 6 January 2008 at the Arts Theatre in London

The Gruffalo said that no gruffalo should
Ever set foot in the deep dark wood...

The stage production of The Gruffalo's Child was presented was Tall Stories who are presenting the stage version of Room on the Broom in London at the Garrick Theatre from from 28 July to 29 August 2010.

But one wild and windy night The Gruffalo's Child ignores her father's warnings about the Big Bad Mouse and tiptoes out into the snow. En route she meets the same fox, owl and snake that her father met some years before. Each points her in a different direction, so by the time the little Gruffalo gets to the heart of the wood, she is beginning to have serious doubts about the scary mouse that her dad has told her about. Just about to give up and go home, she sees a little mouse and decides to stop for a mousey snack. But Mouse is not in the mood to be eaten and comes up with an ingenious plan to scare the little Gruffalo away. Standing on a twig as the moon shines, Mouse casts a big bad mousey shadow on the ground - and this is enough to send the Gruffalo's Child running home...

"Lovingly and simply brought to the stage" The London Evening Standard

The Gruffalo's Child in London is presented by Tall Stories and is the sequel to their hugely successful original show The Gruffalo which has played two seasons in London's West End. The Gruffalo's Child is an adaptation of the picture book by Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler.

"Fun, daft and a little scary!" Time Out

This production combines Tall Stories' unique physical storytelling style with new songs, humour and a touch of magic. In addition, puppetry is used to help create the sense of the size of the Gruffalo next to his child as well as to illustrate the scary mouse that the Gruffalo's Child thinks she has seen... For the majority of the show, a narrator (who later becomes Mouse) leads us through the tale. Most suitable for those aged 3 and up, and their adults!