Fame the Musical

This show has now closed, click here for a listing of current and future London shows

Opened 27 June 1995, closed 28 September 1996 at the Cambridge Theatre
Returned 11 November 1997, closed 17 January 1998 at the Victoria Palace Theatre
Returned 15 October 1998, closed 16 January 1999 at the Prince of Wales Theatre
Returned 3 October 2000, closed 8 September 2001 at the Victoria Palace Theatre
Transferred 20 September 2001, closed 31 August 2002 at the Cambridge Theatre
Transferred 6 September 2002, closed 29 April 2006 at the Aldwych Theatre
Returned 8 May 2007, closed 1 September 2007 at the Shaftesbury Theatre in London

Fame! I'm Gonna Live Forever!

The hit West End show Fame The Musical returns to the London stage for a strictly limited summer season. Over the last 12 years Fame The Musical has established itself as one of the country's most successful theatrical productions. Premiered in the West End in June 1995 at The Cambridge Theatre it was nominated for two Olivier Awards, the stage spectacular enjoyed a hugely successful run in London at various theatres.

"Dance dynamite" The Express

Over four million people have already enjoyed the eternally inspiring story of the kids from New York's School for the Performing Arts. Always recruiting the freshest young talent, each cast in Fame The Musical of over 30 electric performers has wowed the crowds as they rocket through phenomenal dance routines and unforgettable songs, including the legendary Fame.

The cast for Fame the Musical in London at the Shaftesbury Theatre features Natalie Casey and Ian 'H' Watkins. Natalie Casey is best known for her starring roles as 'Donna' in the BBC television series Two Pints of Larger & A Packet of Crisps. She also played the role of 'Carol Groves' in the tv series Hollyoaks. Ian 'H' Watkins is best known as a member of the pop group Steps. After the group disbanded H went on to appear in the musical Joseph and the Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat in London's West End. He was recently seen as a housemate in the 2007 television series of Celebrity Big Brother on Channel 4.

Fame in London is directed by Olivier Award winner Karen Bruce. The show follows one group of students from auditions to their graduation ceremony, taking audiences through the highs, lows, friendships, romances and sheer hard work that is daily life for the star-struck pupils in their quest for success. For some it is too much, but ultimately tragedy and triumph combine in a spectacular finale that has prompted standing ovations around the world.

"Breathtaking... The energy is astounding" The Independent

Did You Know? Fame The Musical has played at five West End theatres? The Cambridge Theatre from June 1995 to September 1996, The Victoria Palace Theatre from November 1997 to January 1998, The Prince of Wales Theatre from October 1998 to January 1999, returning to The Victoria Palace Theatre from October 2000 to September 2001, returning to The Cambridge Theatre from September 2001 to August 2002, The Aldwych Theatre from September 2002 to April 2006 and now, The Shaftesbury Theatre from May 2007; over 7,500 actors and actresses have auditioned for the production. The show has played at more than 50 regional theatres. Over the years the cast have been through 5,000 pairs of tights, 2,500 pairs of legwarmers, 1,000 leotards, 250 sweatbands... and four bright yellow NYC cabs! In addition there are some 200 costumes in Fame the Musical, with 100 costume changes at each performance.

"Wild horses couldn't have dragged me away from Fame The Musical, though it must be said that afterwards it felt like I'd been trampled by some. Fame The Musical is the tale of a batch of dramatic art students who want FAME! at any cost, and race about in decrepit leotard-and-shorts ensembles to prove it... Despite this, Fame The Musical is a feel-good triumph." The Mail on Sunday

"Fame is already famous as a film and a television series. Now it has been turned into a stage musical... What we are left with is calculated compassion, fabricated uplift, cast-iron, reinforced-concrete sentimentality - and, to be fair, some skilful bounding around and lots and lots of energy. Most of the young cast show talent; let us hope they go on to apply it to better things." The Sunday Telegraph

"An energetic cast auditions for our favour, somehow suspended between Sondheim's Merrily We Roll Along and Hamlisch's A Chorus Line (both musicals of intellect, vigour and genius) with feeble nods towards such crappy, ersatz rock and roll imposters as Grease and Saturday Night Fever. The kids are in training for 'the hardest profession in the world'. They leave you limp with indifference and anxious to discover what might be the softest." The Observer

"The rock and gospel version of the television series cloned from the original movie is full of the insatiable yearning that drives so many modern musicals... The relentless enthusiasm is tempered by a little conflict: the nominal leads in a company show are a pupil who goes to the bad, and another who nearly does. A teacher stands up for the values of an all-round education. There is, however, a sense of diminishing returns as each emotional and musical climax gets more frenetic. To judge by the screaming, this is the perfect sixth-form treat." The Sunday Times