Cyrano De Bergerac

Playhouse Theatre
Northumberland Avenue, London

Public Previews: 27 November 2019
Opens: 6 December 2019
Closes: 29 February 2020

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Theatre seating plan

Show times
Monday at 7.30pm
Tuesday at 7.30pm
Wednesday at 7.30m
Thursday at 2.30pm and 7.30pm
Friday at 7.30pm
Saturday at 2.30pm and 7.30pm
Sunday no shows

Note:
Thu 28 Nov at 7.30pm only
Sat 30 Nov at 7.30pm only
Mon 2 Dec no shows
Fri 6 Dec at 7.00pm only
Mon 16 Dec no shows
Mon 23 Dec no shows
Tue 24 Dec no shows
Wed 25 Dec no shows
Thu 26 Dec no shows
Fri 27 Dec no shows
Sat 28 Dec no shows
Tue 31 Dec at 2.30pm only
Wed 1 Jan no shows
Thu 2 Jan at 7.30pm only
Mon 6 Jan no shows
Thu 16 Jan at 7.30pm only
Mon 20 Jan no shows
Thu 30 Jan at 7.30pm only
Mon 3 Feb no shows
Thu 13 Feb at 7.30pm only
Mon 17 Feb no shows
Thu 27 Feb at 7.30pm only

Runs ? hours and ? minutes

Seat prices
? to ?
(plus booking fees if applicable)

Cyrano De Bergerac

A major revival of Edmond Rostand's play Cyrano de Bergerac in London starring James McAvoy in the title role.

"My life story - cloaked in the dark, a man whom no-one sees, while someone else ascends the jasmine trees and claims the wonderful, the ultimate prize." Swordsman, poet, philosopher, Cyrano de Bergerac. His musketeer-heroics combine with rapier wit, but the bravado belies a passionate love for his exquisite cousin, Roxane. Too ugly to win her for himself, or so he thinks, he agrees to woo her on behalf of another. His tender verse gives voice to the inarticulate, dashing Christian, gaining him her heart just before both men depart for war. A wildly romantic story laced with swagger, gallantry and sacrifice.

Presented in a free adaptation by Martin Crimp. PLEASE NOTE: Suitable for ages 12 and above. This production contains swearing and full frontal nudity.

The cast features James McAvoy as 'Cyrano de Bergerac' - other cast to be announced. Directed by Jamie Lloyd with designs by Soutra Gilmour, lighting by Jon Clark, and music and sound by Ben and Max Ringham.

James McAvoy's West End theatre credits include the roles of 'Jack Gurney' in the revival of Peter Barnes' The Ruling Class at the Trafalgar Studios in 2015; the title role in the revival of William Shakespeare's Macbeth at the Trafalgar Studios in 2013; and 'Walker' and 'Ned' in the revival of Richard Greenberg's Three Days of Rain at the Apollo Theatre in 2009 - which where all directed by Jamie Lloyd.

Edmond Rostand wrote his verse play for the celebrated French actor Benoit-Constant Coquelin who played the title role at the Premiere at the Theatre de la Porte St. Martin in Paris on 28 December 1897. The play was an immediate success and the play - with the original cast - was transferred to London's Lyceum Theatre in the West End for a two week run, performed in French, in July 1898. Benoit-Constant Coquelin would return to London, with his company, to perform the play a number of times over the next ten years. The first English language staging in the West End took place in April 1900 with Charles Wyndham starring in the title role opposite his wife, Mary Moore, as 'Roxanne'. In 1919 the actor Robert Loraine scored a considerable success in the title role, since when the role has been played in London by Ralph Richardson, Edward Woodward, Derek Jacobi, Edward Petherbridge, Robert Lindsay and Antony Sher, amongst others.

Cyrano De Bergerac in London at the Playhouse Theatre, public previews from 27 November 2019, opens on 6 December 2019, and closes on 29 February 2020


West End London Premiere 1898 (in French) with Benoit-Constant Coquelin

1st West End London Revival 1899 with Benoit-Constant Coquelin

2nd West End London Revival 1900 (English Language Premiere) with Charles Wyndham and Mary Moore

3rd West End London Revival 1901 with Benoit-Constant Coquelin and Sarah Bernhardt

4th West End London Revival with Benoit-Constant Coquelin

5th West End London Revival with Benoit-Constant Coquelin

6th West End London Revival 1907 with Benoit-Constant Coquelin

7th West End London Revival with Benoit-Constant Coquelin

8th West End London Revival 1919 with Robert Loraine

9th West End London Revival 1927 with Robert Loraine

10th West End London Revival 1946 with Ralph Richardson, Margaret Leighton and Alec Guinness

11th West End London Revival 1967 with David Buck

12th West End London Revival 1970 with Edward Woodward and Anna Carteret

London Revival 1983 with Derek Jacobi

London Revival 1990 with Edward Petherbridge and Jemma Redgrave

13th West End London Revival 1992 with Robert Lindsay, Stella Gonet and Julian Glover

London Revival 1995 with Naseeruddin Shah

14th West End London Revival with Antony Sher and Alexandra Gilbreath

London Revival 2004 with Stephen Rea

London Revival 2016 with Kathryn Hunter


West End London Premiere 1898 (in French) with Benoit-Constant Coquelin

Opened 4 July 1898, Closed 19 July 1898 at the Lyceum Theatre

The cast featured Benoit-Constant Coquelin as 'Cyrano de Bergerac', Maurice Volny as 'Baron Christian de Neuvillette', Marie Legault as 'Roxanne', and Maxime Desjardins as 'Comte de Guiche'.

Performed in French. A transfer of the original production from the Porte St Martin Theatre, Paris, with the original cast.


1st West End London Revival 1899 with Benoit-Constant Coquelin

Opened 26 June 1899, Closed 13 July 1899 (in repertory) at the Adelphi Theatre

The cast featured Benoit-Constant Coquelin as 'Cyrano de Bergerac', Maurice Volny as 'Baron Christian de Neuvillette', Marguerite Esquilar as 'Roxanne', and Maxime Desjardins as 'Comte de Guiche'.

Performed in French as part of a short 'Coquelin' season.


2nd West End London Revival 1900 (English Language Premiere) with Charles Wyndham and Mary Moore

Opened 19 April 1900, Closed 1 June 1900 at the Wyndham's Theatre

Translated by Stuart Ogilvie and Louis N Parker.

The cast featured Charles Wyndham as 'Cyrano de Bergerac', Alfred Kendrick as 'Baron Christian de Neuvillette', Mary Moore as 'Roxanne', and Jerrold Robertshaw as 'Comte de Guiche'.

This was the London West End English language Premiere.


3rd West End London Revival 1901 with Benoit-Constant Coquelin and Sarah Bernhardt

Opened 9 July 1901, Closed 11 July 1901 at Her Majesty's Theatre

The cast featured Benoit-Constant Coquelin as 'Cyrano de Bergerac', Georges Deneubourg as 'Baron Christian de Neuvillette', Sarah Bernhardt as 'Roxanne', and Henri Deschamps as 'Comte de Guiche'/

Performed in French as part of a short 'Coquelin' season.


4th West End London Revival with Benoit-Constant Coquelin

Opened 30 June 1902, Closed 5 July 1902 at the Garrick Theatre

The cast featured Benoit-Constant Coquelin as 'Cyrano de Bergerac', Maurice Volny as 'Baron Christian de Neuvillette', Marguerite Esquilar as 'Roxanne', and Rozenberg as 'Comte de Guiche'.

Performed in French as part of a short 'Coquelin' season.


5th West End London Revival with Benoit-Constant Coquelin

Opened 12 June 1906, Closed 16 June 1906 at the Royalty Theatre (now demolished)

The cast featured Benoit-Constant Coquelin as 'Cyrano de Bergerac', Rene d'Auchy as 'Baron Christian de Neuvillette', Suzanne Devoyod as 'Roxanne', and Maxime Desjardins as 'Comte de Guiche'.

Performed in French as part of a short 'Coquelin' season.

The Royalty Theatre was located at 73 Dean Street, Soho.


6th West End London Revival 1907 with Benoit-Constant Coquelin

Opened 31 January 1907, Closed 2 February 1907 at the Royalty Theatre (now demolished)

The cast featured Benoit-Constant Coquelin as 'Cyrano de Bergerac', Rene d'Auchy as 'Baron Christian de Neuvillette', Carmen de Raisy as 'Roxanne', and Monteux as 'Comte de Guiche'.

Performed in French as part of a short 'Coquelin' season.

The Royalty Theatre was located at 73 Dean Street, Soho.


7th West End London Revival with Benoit-Constant Coquelin

Opened 26 June 1908, Closed 10 July 1908 (in repertory) at His Majesty's Theatre (now Her Majesty's Theatre)

The cast featured Benoit-Constant Coquelin as 'Cyrano de Bergerac', Rene d'Auchy as 'Baron Christian de Neuvillette', Gilda Darthy as 'Roxanne', and Monteux as 'Comte de Guiche'.

Performed in French as part of a short 'Coquelin' season.


8th West End London Revival 1919 with Robert Loraine

Opened 28 March 1919, Closed 3 May 1919 at the Garrick Theatre
Transferred 5 May 1919, Closed 28 June 1919 at the Theatre Royal Drury Lane
Transferred 30 June 1919, Closed 13 September 1919 at the Duke of York's Theatre
Transferred 15 September 1919, Closed 10 October 1919 at the Savoy Theatre

Translated by Gladys Thomas and Mary F Guillemard.

The original cast featured Robert Loraine as 'Cyrano de Bergerac', Nicholas Hannen as 'Baron Christian de Neuvillette', Stella Mervyn-Campbell as 'Roxanne', and Gerald Lawrence as 'Comte de Guiche'.

Directed by Robert Loraine.


9th West End London Revival 1927 with Robert Loraine

Opened 7 November 1927, Closed 10 December 1927 at the Apollo Theatre

Translated by Gladys Thomas and Mary F Guillemard.

The cast featured Robert Loraine as 'Cyrano de Bergerac', Francis Lister as 'Baron Christian de Neuvillette', Winifred Wynne as 'Roxanne', and John Wyse as 'Comte de Guiche'.

Directed by Robert Loraine.


10th West End London Revival 1946 with Ralph Richardson, Margaret Leighton and Alec Guinness

Opened 24 October 1946, Closed 31 May 1947 (in repertory) at the New Theatre (now Noel Coward Theatre)

Translated by Brian Hooker.

The cast featured Ralph Richardson as 'Cyrano de Bergerac', Michael Warre as 'Baron Christian de Neuvillette', Margaret Leighton as 'Roxanne', and Alec Guinness as 'Comte de Guiche'.

Directed by Tyrone Guthie with designs by Tanya Moiseiwitsch.

Presented by the Old Vic Company.


11th West End London Revival 1967 with David Buck

Opened 12 July 1967, Closed 19 August 1967 at the Regent's Park Open Air Theatre

Translated by James Forsyth.

The cast featured David Buck as 'Cyrano de Bergerac', Christopher Gable as 'Baron Christian de Neuvillette', Gabrielle Drake as 'Roxanne', and Edgar Wreford as 'Comte de Guiche'.

Directed by Richard Digby Day with sets by Henry Bardon, and costumes by Tim Goodchild.


12th West End London Revival 1970 with Edward Woodward and Anna Carteret

Opened 27 October 1970, Closed 1 April 1971 (in repertory) at the Cambridge Theatre

Translated by Patrick Garland.

The cast featured Edward Woodward as 'Cyrano de Bergerac', James Fagan as 'Baron Christian de Neuvillette', Anna Carteret as 'Roxanne', and Charles Kay as 'Comte de Guiche'.

Directed by Patrick Garland with movement by Claude Chagrin, designs by Carl Toms, lighting by Robert Ornbo, and music by Marc Wilkinson.

Presented by the National Theatre.


London Revival 1983 with Derek Jacobi

Previewed 21 July 1983, Opened 27 July 1983, Closed 24 March 1984 (in repertory) at the Barbican Theatre

Translated by Anthony Burgess.

The cast featured Derek Jacobi as 'Cyrano de Bergerac', Floyd Bevan as 'Baron Christian de Neuvillette', Alice Krige as 'Roxanne', and John Carlisle as 'Comte de Guiche'.

Directed by Terry Hands with sets by Ralph Koltai, and costumes by Alexander Reid.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


London Revival 1990 with Edward Petherbridge and Jemma Redgrave

Previewed 21 September 1990, Opened 24 September 1990, Closed 3 November 1990 at the Greenwich Theatre

Translated by Patrick Garland.

The cast featured Edward Petherbridge as 'Cyrano de Bergerac', Jason Connery as 'Baron Christian de Neuvillette', Jemma Redgrave as 'Roxanne', and Ian Barritt as 'Comte de Guiche'.

Directed by Matthew Francis with designs by Stewart Laing, lighting by Rick Fisher, music by Mia Soteriou, and sound by Steve Huttly.


13th West End London Revival 1992 with Robert Lindsay, Stella Gonet and Julian Glover

Previewed 30 November 1992, Opened 14 December 1992, Closed 12 June 1993 at the Theatre Royal Haymarket

Translated by John Wells.

The cast featured Robert Lindsay as 'Cyrano de Bergerac', Gary Cady as 'Baron Christian de Neuvillette', Stella Gonet as 'Roxanne', and Julian Glover as 'Comte de Guiche'.

Directed by Elijah Moshinsky with choreography by Eleanor Fazan, designs by Michael Yeargan, lighting by David Hersey, music by Jason Carr, and sound by Paul Arditti.

The performance on Monday 30 November 1992, attended by The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh, accompanied by Prince Edward and Princess Margaret, was a Special Performance in aid of the Combined Theatrical Charities Appeals Council to mark the Fortieth Anniversary of Her Majesty's Accession.


London Revival 1995 with Naseeruddin Shah

Previewed 19 October 1995, Opened 25 October 1995, Closed 13 January 1996 (in repertory) at the National Theatre's Cottesloe Theatre

Adapted by Jatinder Verma from a verse translation by Ranjit Bolt.

The cast featured Naseeruddin Shah as 'Cyrano Danmull Barchha', Andrew Mallett as 'Kishan' (Christian), and Kumiko Mendl as 'Rukhsaan' (Roxanne), with Yogesh Bhatt, Vinny Dhillon, Vincent Ebrahim, Nizwar Karanj, John Leary, Richard Santhiri and Vidya Rao.

Directed by Anuradha Kapur with choreography by Shobana Jeyasingh, designs by Magdalen Rubalcava, lighting by Paul O'Leary, music by Vandraj Bhatia, and sound by Sue Patrick.

The setting was moved to a provincial Indian theatre company in the 1930s.

Presented as a co-production between Tara Arts and the National Theatre.


14th West End London Revival with Antony Sher and Alexandra Gilbreath

Previewed 25 November 1997, Opened 27 November 1997, Closed 14 February 1998 at the Lyric Theatre

The Royal Shakespeare Company present's Gregory Doran's revival of Rostand's play Cyrano de Bergerac in London starring Antony Sher and Geoffrey Freshwater.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company in a translation by Anthony Burgess.

The cast featured Antony Sher as 'Cyrano de Bergerac', Raymond Coulthard as 'Baron Christian de Neuvillette', Alexandra Gilbreath as 'Roxanne', and Ken Bones as 'Comte de Guiche', with Geoffrey Freshwater as 'Ragueneau', Darlene Johnson as 'Duenna', and Gary Powell as 'Le Bret', along with Nicholas Blane, Simon Chadwick, Jonathan Drysdale, Robert Goodale, Katherine Grice, Robert Horwell, Stephanie Jacob, Michael Jenn, Gerald Kyd, Alan Perrin, and Christopher Wells.

Directed by Gregory Doran with movement by Struan Leslie, designs by Robert Jones, lighting by Howard Harrison, music by Iiona Sekacz, and sound by Tim Oliver.

"There is more to this lovelorn hero than a stupendous snozzle. He is, as Anthony Burgess's brilliant translation observes, the Three Musketeers and Don Quixote rolled into one. He's a poet, a fighter, a loyal friend and a swashbuckler with more swash to buckle than the rest of the French Guards put together. Antony Sher's highly physical, ferocious yet tender performance places him amongst the great Cyranos and Alexandra Gilbreath is a sparky, funny Roxanne, the woman he adores. Gregory Doran's breathtaking production - the swordplay is sensational - tours the country later in the year. Do see it. Theatre doesn't get any better than this." The News of the World

"Greg Doran's superb production for the Royal Shakespeare Compny sees Antony Sher sporting a quite ludicrous hooter; it might be the pennant at the top of the mast of a sailing boat. But, hyperbolic as it sounds, this nose is no larger than life than the rest of the outsized personality it belongs to... If ever there was an actor who could combine the extravagant with the ludicrous and the heroic, it's Sher. He piercingly suggests that Cyrano's masochism is driven not simply by his reckless, explosive gallantry but by his personal demons, a self-loathing for what he believes is his physical repellence, a fear of failure, a pure and deeply romantic spirit and, finally, an intoxication with poetry and his own verbal artistry... His pain is made all the sharper by Alexandra Galbraith's Roxane, a truly worthy match. Clever and capricious, she too has panache, but her suffering is what I shall remember, her cry of despair when she discovers, too late, Cyrano's deception and the years of love she's been deprived of." The Mail on Sunday

"Edmond Rostand's great flamboyant, Romantic tear-jerker is, above all, a star vehicle, and it gets a superb star performance from Antony Sher. His Cyrano is bustling and scruffy, boyish still, though clearly no longer young, and with an air of boisterous, almost aggressive resignation. He is not really surprised that Roxane (Alexandra Gilbreath, giving a glamorous and impishly intelligent performance) loves somebody else, because he is really a solitary: he performs his heroic exploits and great set speeches for a rapt audience, but the performer himself is enclosed in a solitude he is all too used to... A Boulevard costume drama... brilliantly acted, a piece of enjoyable sentimental tosh." The Sunday Times

Cyrano de Bergerac in London at the Lyric Theatre previewed from 25 November 1997, opened on 27 November 1997 and closed on 14 February 1998


London Revival 2004 with Stephen Rea

Previewed 10 April 2004, Opened 19 April 2004, Closed 24 June 2004 (in repertory) at the National Theatre's Olivier Theatre

A major revival of Edmond Rostand's play Cyrano de Bergerac in London starring Stephen Rea in the title role.

Presented by the National Theatre in an adaptation by Derek Mahon from a literal translation by Christopher Campbell.

The cast featured Stephen Rea as 'Cyrano de Bergerac', Zubin Varla as 'Baron Christian de Neuvillette', Claire Price as 'Roxanne', and Malcolm Storry as 'Comte de Guiche', with Anthony O'Donnell as 'Ragueneau', Nick Sampson as 'Debray', Thomas Arnold as 'Patrick', Stephen Berkeley-White as 'Pierre', Mark Bonnar as 'Ligniere' / 'Jules', David Collings as 'Jodelet', Stephen Critchlow as 'Montfleury', Gildas Diquero as 'Martin', Joanne Fong as 'Garance', Gregory Fox-Murphy as 'Castel-Jaloux', Antonia Grove as 'Aurelia', Dermot Kerrigan as 'Brian', Pascal Langdale as 'Valvert' / 'Gus', Miranda Lind as 'Illumineuse', Katherine Manners as 'Genevieve' / 'Sister Claire', Mairead McKinley as 'Liz' / 'Sister Marguerite', Simon Merrells as 'Bill', Katy Odey as 'Marianne' / 'Sister Anne', Harry Peacock as 'Hugh', William Rycroft as 'Jacques', Trevor Thomas as 'Sentry', Daniel Tuite as 'Bertrand', and Tam Ward as 'Jean'.

Directed by Howard Davies with choreography by Christopher Bruce, sets by William Dudley, costumes by John Bright, lighting by Paul Anderson, music by Dominic Muldowney, and sound by Paul Groothuis.

"Edmond Rostand's Cyrano De Bergerac, about the poet-soldier with a huge nose and an even bigger heart, is among the most ravishingly romantic and swashbuckling plays ever written... Stephen Rea has the right panache for a pacy melodrama set during the era of the Three Musketeers but his efforts are defeated by an arty production and a tediously obscene, in-yer-face modern translation by Derek Mahon. Totally missing is the wit and romantic grandeur of the war-torn melodrama in which Cyrano secretly woos Roxane on behalf of her tongue-tied beau, Christian... Rising star Claire Price makes a lovely Roxane but, along with Rea, she is unable to redeem a disappointing three-hour show that's all nose and no heart." The Daily Express

"Stephen Rea belongs to the rough, tough tradition of Cyranos rather than the elegant, fastidious one; but he takes the interpretation surprisingly far. Yet he's capable of subtle moments. Look at Rea's glum, grieving face when he realises that Claire Price's Roxane loves boring Christian, not him, and his stricken trudge from the balcony where he's serenaded her in the boy's place. He's bold yet wry, fierce yet humble, and in his self-deprecating way impressive enough. Derek Mahon's translation supports this reading, to the point of being more colloquial than Rostand would have wished... The point is doubtless to contrast the unsentimentality of Paris and its wars with the sentimentality of Price's sweet, innocent, lovable but absurdly naive Roxane; but the rhymes vary from the clever to the strenuous and the words become surprisingly coarse for a 19th-century romance... The balletic effects in Howard Davies's production - dancing baker's girls, fencing cadets, dying Gascons - didn't add to the play's atmosphere. Nevertheless, there's energy, and narrative momentum and, at times, fun." The Times

"Stephen Rea is far from running away with the National Theatre's rough revival of Edmond Rostand's 1897 play about the man with the unfeasibly large hooter. This is very much an ensemble production, which is just as well because Rea never quite finds the extravagant charisma to carry the show as swashbuckling Parisian wit Cyrano de Bergerac... For all the tragic generosity of his character, Rea seems unmoved by Derek Mahon's freewheeling, expletive-packed translation, which matches Rostand's French poetry with three hours of florid and bawdy rhyming couplets... Here he is just a nice guy cursed with bad luck and a giant schnozzle. His Cyrano is only a reluctant extrovert who seems as bored with his rapier wit and virtuoso swordplay as he is by his celebrated snout. At times he even seems weighed down by the part and the poetry, and his disenchantment itself becomes disenchanting." The Daily Mail

Cyrano De Bergerac in London at the National Theatre's Olivier Theatre previewed from 10 April 2004, opened on 19 April 2004 and closed on 24 June 2004 - performed in repertory


London Revival 2016 with Kathryn Hunter

Previewed 18 February 2016, Opened 22 February 2016, Closed 19 March 2016 at the Southwark Playhouse

Translated Glyn Maxwell.

The cast featured Kathryn Hunter as 'Cyrano de Bergerac', Ellie Kendrick as 'Baron Christian de Neuvillette', and Sabrina Bartlett as 'Roxanne', with Holly Burn, Tina Chiang, Penelope Dimond, Tamzin Griffin, Kiran Sonia Sawar.

Directed by Russell Bolam with movement by Marcello Magni, designs by Anthony Lamble, lighting by Richard Godin, and music and sound by Harry Blake.

An all-female production.