As You Like It

Barbican Theatre
Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London

Public Previews: 26 October 2019
Opens: 29 October 2019
Closes: 18 January 2020

Buy tickets:

Buy tickets online

Nearest Tube: Barbican

Show times
Sat 26 Oct at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Sun 27 Oct no performances

Mon 28 Oct at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Tue 29 Oct at 7.00pm - As You Like It
Wed 30 Oct at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Thu 31 Oct at 1.15pm - As You Like It
Thu 31 Oct at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Fri 1 Nov at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Sat 2 Nov at 1.15pm - As You Like It
Sat 2 Nov at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Sun 3 Nov no performances

Mon 4 Nov no performances
Tue 5 Nov at 7.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Wed 6 Nov at 7.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Thu 7 Nov at 7.00pm - Taming of the Shrew
Fri 8 Nov at 7.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Sat 9 Nov at 1.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Sat 9 Nov at 7.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Sun 10 Nov no performances

Mon 11 Nov no performances
Tue 12 Nov at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Wed 13 Nov at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Thu 14 Nov at 7.00pm - Measure for Measure
Fri 15 Nov at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Sat 16 Nov at 1.15pm - Measure for Measure
Sat 16 Nov at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Sun 17 Nov no performances

Mon 18 Nov at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Tue 19 Nov at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Wed 20 Nov at 7.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Thu 21 Nov at 1.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Thu 21 Nov at 7.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Fri 22 Nov at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Sat 23 Nov at 1.15pm - As You Like It
Sat 23 Nov at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Sun 24 Nov no performances

Mon 25 Nov no performances
Tue 26 Nov at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Wed 27 Nov at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Thu 28 Nov at 1.15pm - Measure for Measure
Thu 28 Nov at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Fri 29 Nov at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Sat 30 Nov at 1.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Sat 30 Nov at 7.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Sun 1 Dec no performances

Mon 2 Dec at 7.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Tue 3 Dec at 7.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Wed 4 Dec at 7.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Thu 5 Dec at 1.15pm - As You Like It*
Thu 5 Dec at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Fri 6 Dec at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Sat 7 Dec at 1.15pm - Measure for Measure
Sat 7 Dec at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Sun 8 Dec no performances

Mon 9 Dec no performances
Tue 10 Dec at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Wed 11 Dec at 7.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Thu 12 Dec at 1.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Thu 12 Dec at 7.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Fri 13 Dec at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Sat 14 Dec at 1.15pm - Measure for Measure
Sat 14 Dec at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Sun 15 Dec no performances

Mon 16 Dec at 7.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Tue 17 Dec at 7.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Wed 18 Dec at 7.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Thu 19 Dec at 1.15pm - As You Like It
Thu 19 Dec at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Fri 20 Dec at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Sat 21 Dec at 1.15pm - Measure for Measure
Sat 21 Dec at 7.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Sun 22 Dec no performances

Mon 23 Dec at 1.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Mon 23 Dec at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Tue 24 Dec no performances
Wed 25 Dec no performances
Thu 26 Dec no performances
Fri 27 Dec at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Sat 28 Dec at 1.15pm - As You Like It
Sat 28 Dec at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Sun 29 Dec no performances

Mon 30 Dec at 1.15pm - Measure for Measure
Mon 30 Dec at 7.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Tue 31 Dec at 1.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Wed 1 Jan no performances
Thu 2 Jan at 1.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Thu 2 Jan at 7.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Fri 3 Jan at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Sat 4 Jan at 1.15pm - As You Like It
Sat 4 Jan at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Sun 5 Jan no performances

Mon 6 Jan at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Tue 7 Jan at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Wed 8 Jan at 1.15pm - Measure for Measure
Wed 8 Jan at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Thu 9 Jan at 1.15pm - Measure for Measure
Thu 9 Jan at 7.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Fri 10 Jan at 7.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Sat 11 Jan at 1.15pm - Measure for Measure
Sat 11 Jan at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Sun 12 Jan no performances

Mon 13 Jan at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Tue 14 Jan at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Wed 15 Jan at 1.15pm - As You Like It
Wed 15 Jan at 7.15pm - As You Like It
Thu 16 Jan at 1.15pm - As You Like It
Thu 16 Jan at 7.15pm - Measure for Measure
Fri 17 Jan at 7.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Sat 18 Jan at 1.15pm - Taming of the Shrew
Sat 18 Jan at 7.15pm - As You Like It

Note: The performance on Thursday 5 December at 1.15pm is a 'chilled / relaxed' performance

Runs ? hours and ? minutes

Seat prices
£? to £?
(plus booking fees if applicable)

As You Like It

The Royal Shakespeare Company presents Kimberley Sykes' revival of Shakespeare's As You Like It in London for a strictly limited season

Come into the forest; dare to change your state of mind. Rosalind is banished, wrestling with her heart and her head. With her cousin by her side, she journeys to a world of exile where barriers are broken down and all can discover their deeper selves. A fierce, exhilarating version of Shakespeare's romantic comedy.

Performed in repertory with Measure for Measure and Taming of the Shrew.

The cast featuresLucy Phelps as 'Rosalind', Sophie Khan Levy as 'Celia', David Ajao as 'Orlando', Leo Wan as 'Oliver', Antony Byrne as 'Duke Frederick' / 'Duke Senior', Sophie Stanton as 'Jaques', Sandy Grierson as 'Touchstone', Charlotte Arrowsmith as 'Audrey', Amelia Donkor as 'Silvia', Laura Elsworthy as 'Phoebe', with Patrick Brennan as 'Corin', Graeme Brookes as 'Charles', Richard Clews as 'Adam', Tom Dawze as 'William', Emily Johnstone as 'Amiens' / 'Monsieur Le Beau', Alex Jones as 'Lord', Karina Jones as 'Sir Oliver Martext', and Aaron Thiara as 'Jaques de Bois' / ' Dennis'.

Directed by Kimberley Sykes with movement by Ayse Tashkiran, sets by Stephen Brimson Lewis, costumes and lighting by Bretta Gerecke, music by Tim Sutton, and sound by Jonathan Ruddick. This production transfers to London following a successful season in repertory at the RSC's Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon where it previewed from 14 February 2019, opened on 21 February 2019, and closed on 31 August 2019.

Lucy Phelps' West End theatre credits include the role of 'Diamond' in Paul Garrington's production of Jennifer Saunders' 'Spice Girls' musical Viva Forever! at the Piccadilly Theatre in 2012.

Antony Byrne's London theatre credits include the role of 'Charley Malloy' in Steven Berkoff's stage adaptation of the Budd Shulberg and Stan Silverman film On The Waterfront at the Haymarket Theatre in 2009.

Sophie Stanton's West End stage credits include the roles of 'Joyce Hopkirk' and 'Muriel McKay' in Rupert Goold's production of James Graham's Ink at the Duke of York's Theatre in 2017.

Sandy Grierson's London stage credits include the roles of 'Captain' and 'Priest' in David Farr's revival of Shakespeare's Twelfth Night, for the Royal Shakespeare Company, at the Roundhouse Theatre in 2012.

Patrick Brennan's London theatre credits include the roles of 'Lieutenant Brannigan' in the original cast of Michael Grandage's revival of the Frank Loesser musical Guys and Dolls at the Piccadilly Theatre in 2005; and 'Banquo' in Tim Carroll's revival of Shakespeare's Macbeth at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre in 2001.

Richard Clews' West End theatre credits include the roles of 'Old Man' and 'Gentleman Informer' in Jonathan Munby's revival of Shakespeare's King Lear at the Duke of York's Theatre in 2018.

When this production originally opened at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon in February 2019, Dominic Cavendish in the Daily Telegraph said that Kimberley Sykes' "inventive, playful and enjoyable production of As You Like... features a sublime central performance from Lucy Phelps as Rosalind, which looks set to transform this under-known actress's reputation," adding that "the evening goes full panto at the end with a giant-faced puppet of the god Hymen. Bonkers, at times brilliant, there's a lot to like here, and a fair bit to love." Fiona Mountford in the London Evening Standard praised how "Lucy Phelps's Rosalind is, from beginning to end, a lovely, livewire performer and her bond of deep and playful friendship with Sophie Khan Levy's spirited, sometimes sceptical Celia is a joy... The shift here is marked by house lights coming up to reveal all the bustle of backstage workings, launching us into a choppy sequence of disappointingly under-connected scenes that even includes some half-baked audience participation." Sam Marlowe in The Times highlighted that "Kimberley Sykes's production offers some strong performances and a promising concept. But it never discovers a sense of purpose and is hampered by a grinding lack of pace and vim... Her direction is choppy and unfocused, with long periods of monotony punctuated by shouty histrionics. Lucy Phelps and David Ajao's Orlando generate a bantering intimacy without much romantic or erotic chemistry." Luke Jones in the Daily Mail wrote that "Lucy Phelps is mighty good as Rosalind, with an energetic, hockey sticks vibe... her command of the poetry, the wit - and the room - is something to behold. Sophie Khan Levy, too, is pure gold as co-conspirator Celia: squeezing each laugh out of the text." Miriam Gillinson in the Guardian described how "David Ajao's Orlando has the eager energy of a young pup, as he scampers through the forest and scrawls endless letters to his beloved... Lucy Phelps's Rosalind is the show's heart and focal point, and a genuinely modern heroine."

As You Like It in London at the Barbican Theatre public previews from 26 October 2019, opens on 29 October 2019, and closes on 18 January 2020 - in repertory


1936 West End London Revival with Edith Evans, Michael Redgrave and Alec Guinness

1938 London Revival with Gladys Cooper and Geoffrey Edwards

1943 London Revival with Helen Cherry and Michael Oldham

1944 London Revival with Rosalind Iden, Richard Lyndhurst and Donald Wolfit

1945 London Revival with Cicely Paget-Bowman and Michael Ingham

1946 London Revival with Vivienne Bennett and John Byron

1947 West End London Revival with Rosalind Iden, Richard Lyndhurst and Vivien Merchant

1948 London Revival with Lesley Waring and Joseph O'Conor

1949 West End London Revival with Jean Wilson and Pierre Lefevre

1952 London Revival with Mary Kerridge and Basil Hoskins

1955 West End London Revival with Virginia McKenna and John Neville

1956 London Revival with Belinda Lee and Bernard Brown

1958 London Revival with Cecilia Sonnenberg and Leonard Graham

1959 West End London Revival with Barbara Jefford, John Justin, Maggie Smith, Alec McCowan and Judi Dench

1962 West End London Revival with Vanessa Redgrave, Ian Bannen and Ian Richardson

1965 London Revival with Ann Morrish, Gary Raymond and Phyllida Law

1967 West End London Revival with Deborah Stanford, Brian Cox, Timothy Dalton and Oliver Ford-Davies

1967 West End London Revival with Dorothy Tutin, Michael Williams, Janet Suzman, Patrick Stewart, Alan Howard, Frances De La Tour and Ben Kingsley

1967 West End London Revival with Ronald Pickup, Jeremy Brett, Robert Stephens, Derek Jacobi and Anthony Hopkins

1973 London Revival with Dily Hamlett, Martin Potter and Ian Talbot

1975 London Revival with Susan Hampshire and Pip Miller

1978 West End London Revival with Charlotte Cornwell, James Laurenson, Charles Dance, Cherie Lunghi and Oliver Ford-Davies

1979 London Revival with Sara Kestelman, Simon Callow, Marjorie Yates, Michael Bryant and Greg Hicks

1981/1982 West End London Revival with Susan Fleetwood, John Bowe and Sinead Cusack

1983 London Revival with Louise Jameson, John Curry and Douglas Hodge

1985 London Revival with Juliet Stevenson, Hilton McRae, Fiona Shaw, Alan Rickman and Lesley Manville

1988 West End London Revival with Tam Hoskyns, James Larkin, Sophie Thompson, Kenneth Branagh and Samantha Bond

1989 West End London Revival with Fiona Shaw, Adam Kotz and James Fleet

1990 London Revival with Sophie Thompson, Jerome Flynn and Alan Cumming

1992 London Revival with Cathryn Harrison, Oliver Parker, Rhys Ifans and Bette Bourne

1993 London Revival with Kate Buffery, Peter De Jersey and Samantha Bond

1995 West End London Revival with Adrian Lester and Scott Handy (Cheek By Jowl)

1996 London Revival with Niamh Cusack, Liam Cunningham, David Tennant, Joseph Fiennes and Victoria Hamilton

1998 London Revival with Anastasia Hille and Paul Hilton

2000 London Revival with Alexandra Gilbreath and Anthony Howell

2002 London Revival with Rebecca Johnson and Benedict Cumberbatch

2005 West End London Revival with Helen McCrory, Sienna Miller, Dominic West, Reece Shearsmith and Sean Hughes

2006 West End London Revival with Lia Williams and Barnaby Kay

2009 London Revival with Naomi Frederick and Jack Laskey

2010 West End London Revival with Juliet Rylance, Christian Camargo and Stephen Dillane

2011 London Revival with Katy Stephens and Jonjo O'Neill

2015 London Revival with Michelle Terry and Simon Harrison

2015 London Revival with Rosalie Craig, Joe Bannister, Patsy Ferran and Mark Benton

2018 London Revival with Olivia Vinall and Edward Hogg

London Revival 2018/2019 with Jack Laskey and Bettrys Jones


1936 West End London Revival with Edith Evans, Michael Redgrave and Alec Guinness

Opened 10 November 1936, Closed 5 December 1936 at the Old Vic Theatre
Transferred 11 February 1937, Closed 13 March 1937 at the New Theatre (now Noel Coward Theatre)

The cast at both the Old Vic and New Theatres featured Edith Evans as 'Rosalind' and Michael Redgrave as 'Orlando'. At the Old Vic only the cast also included Alec Guinness as 'Le Beau' / 'William'.

Directed by Esme Church, with designs by Molly McArthur.

This production was set in the 18th Century. London's National Portrait Gallery holds Madame Yevonde's photograph of the original Old Vic Theatre cast in costume on stage.


1938 London Revival with Gladys Cooper and Geoffrey Edwards

Opened 9 September 1938, Closed 20 September 1938 at the Open Air Theatre Regent's Park

The cast featured Gladys Cooper as 'Rosalind' and Geoffrey Edwards as 'Orlando'.

Directed by Robert Atkins.


1943 London Revival with Helen Cherry and Michael Oldham

Opened 7 June 1943, Closed 21 August 1943 (in repertory) at the Open Air Theatre Regent's Park

The cast featured Helen Cherry as 'Rosalind' and Michael Oldham as 'Orlando'.

Directed by Robert Atkins.


1944 London Revival with Rosalind Iden, Richard Lyndhurst and Donald Wolfit

Opened 29 February 1944, Closed 6 May 1944 (in repertory) at the Scala Theatre (demolished)

The cast featured Rosalind Iden as 'Rosalind' and Richard Lyndhurst as 'Orlando', with Donald Wolfit as 'Touchstone'.

Directed by Donald Wolfit.

The Scala Theatre, now demolished, was located in Charlotte Street/Tottenham Court Road.


1945 London Revival with Cicely Paget-Bowman and Michael Ingham

Opened 12 June 1945, Closed 30 June 1945 at the Open Air Theatre in Regent's Park

The cast featured Cicely Paget-Bowman as 'Rosalind' and Michael Ingham as 'Orlando'.

Directed by Eric Capton.


1946 London Revival with Vivienne Bennett and John Byron

Opened 30 May 1946, Closed 26 June 1946 at the Open Air Theatre in Regent's Park

The cast featured Vivienne Bennett as 'Rosalind' and John Byron as 'Orlando'.

Directed by Robert Atkins.


1947 West End London Revival with Rosalind Iden, Richard Lyndhurst and Vivien Merchant

Opened 19 April 1947, Closed 30 May 1947 (in repertory) at the Savoy Theatre

The cast featured Rosalind Iden as 'Rosalind' and Richard Lyndhurst as 'Orlando', with Donald Wolfit as 'Touchstone', and Vivien Merchant as 'Phebe'.

Directed by Donald Wolfit.


1948 London Revival with Lesley Waring and Joseph O'Conor

Opened 8 June 1948, Closed 3 July 1948 at the Open Air Theatre in Regent's Park

The cast featured Lesley Waring as 'Rosalind' and Joseph O'Conor as 'Orlando'.

Directed by Robert Atkins.


1949 West End London Revival with Jean Wilson and Pierre Lefevre

Opened 3 January 1949, Closed 8 January 1949 at the Old Vic Theatre

The cast featured Jean Wilson as 'Rosalind' and Pierre Lefevre as 'Orlando'.

Directed by Glen Byam Shaw with designs by Motley (Margaret Harris, Sophie Harris and Elizabeth Montgomery Wilmot).


1952 London Revival with Mary Kerridge and Basil Hoskins

Opened 29 May 1952, Closed 28 June 1952 at the Open Air Theatre in Regent's Park

The cast featured Mary Kerridge as 'Rosalind' and Basil Hoskins as 'Orlando'.

Directed by Robert Atkins.


1955 West End London Revival with Virginia McKenna and John Neville

Opened 1 March 1955, Closed 7 June 1955 (in repertory) at the Old Vic Theatre

The cast featured Virginia McKenna as 'Rosalind' and John Neville as 'Orlando'.

Directed by Robert Helpmann with designs by Domenico Gnoli.


1956 London Revival with Belinda Lee and Bernard Brown

Opened 28 May 1956, Closed 21 July 1956 (in repertory) at the Open Air Theatre in Regent's Park

The original cast featured Belinda Lee as 'Rosalind' and Bernard Brown as 'Orlando'.

Directed by Robert Atkins.


1958 London Revival with Cecilia Sonnenberg and Leonard Graham

Opened 14 July 1958, Closed 9 August 1958 at the Open Air Theatre in Regent's Park

The cast featured Cecilia Sonnenberg as 'Rosalind' and Leonard Graham as 'Orlando'.

Directed by Leslie French.


1959 West End London Revival with Barbara Jefford, John Justin, Maggie Smith, Alec McCowan and Judi Dench

Opened 3 September 1959, Closed 4 February 1960 (in reperory) at the Old Vic Theatre

The cast featured Barbara Jefford as 'Rosalind', Maggie Smith as 'Celia', John Justin as 'Orlando', Jeremy Kemp as 'Oliver', David King as 'Duke Senior', Norman Scace as 'Duke Frederick', Donald Houston as 'Jacques', Alec McCowan as 'Touchstone', Moyra Fraser as 'Audrey', John Stride as 'Silvius', and Judi Dench as 'Phebe'.

Directed by Wendy Toye with designs by Malcolm Pride.


1962 West End London Revival with Vanessa Redgrave, Ian Bannen and Ian Richardson

Opened 10 January 1962, Closed 2 June 1962 (in repertory) at the Aldwych Theatre

The cast featured Vanessa Redgrave as 'Rosalind', Rosalind Knight as 'Celia', Ian Bannen as 'Orlando', David Buck as 'Oliver', Paul Hardwick as 'Duke Senior', Tony Church as 'Duke Frederick', Max Adrian as 'Jacques', Patrick Wymark as 'Touchstone', Patsy Byrne as 'Audrey', Peter Gill as 'Silvius', and Jeanne Hepple as 'Phebe', with Ian Richardson as 'Jaques de Boys' / 'Le Beau'.

Directed by Michael Elliott with choreography by Litz Pisk, designs by Richard Negri, lighting by Pilbrow Richard, and music by George Hall.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1965 London Revival with Ann Morrish, Gary Raymond and Phyllida Law

Previewed 9 June 1965, Opened 10 June 1965, Closed 14 August 1965 (straight-run) at the Open Air Theatre Regent's Park

The cast featured Ann Morrish as 'Rosalind', Phyllida Law as 'Celia', Gary Raymond as 'Orlando', Greville Hallam as 'Oliver', Michael Lynch as 'Duke Frederick', John Justin as 'Duke Senior', Alfred Burke as 'Jacques', Edward Atienza as 'Touchstone', Jennie Woodford as 'Audrey', Bernard Hopkins as 'Sylvius', and Carol MacReady as 'Phebe'.

Directed by Harold Lang with choreography by Geraldine Stephenson, designs by Peter Rice, music by Elisabeth Lutyens, and lighting by Brian Benn.

The 'preview' was a charity performance.


1967 West End London Revival with Deborah Stanford, Brian Cox, Timothy Dalton and Oliver Ford-Davies

Opened 13 June 1967, Closed 12 August 1967 at the Vaudeville Theatre

The cast featured Deborah Stanford as 'Rosalind', Alison Key as 'Celia', Brian Cox as 'Orlando', Timothy Dalton as 'Oliver', Oliver Ford-Davies as 'Duke Frederick' / 'Duke Senior', Paul Chapman as 'Jacques', Colin Farrell as 'Touchstone', Charlotte Howard as 'Audrey', Roy Herrick as 'Silvius', and Ann Penfold as 'Phebe'.

Directed by Peter Dews with designs by Pamela Howard, lighting by Michael Northen, and songs by Colin Farrell.

Presented by the Birmingham Repertory Theatre Company.


1967 West End London Revival with Dorothy Tutin, Michael Williams, Janet Suzman, Patrick Stewart, Alan Howard, Frances De La Tour and Ben Kingsley

Opened 19 July 1967, Closed 11 September 1967 (in repertory) at the Aldwych Theatre

The cast featured Dorothy Tutin as 'Rosalind', Janet Suzman as 'Celia', Michael Williams as 'Orlando', Charles Thomas as 'Oliver', Morgan Sheppard as 'Duke Frederick', Patrick Stewart as 'Duke Senior, Alan Howard as 'Jacques', Roy Kinnear as 'Touchstone', Frances De La Tour as 'Audrey', John Kane as 'Silvius', and June Watts as 'Phebe', with Ben Kingsley as '2nd Lord', and Roger Rees in the ensemble.

Directed by David Jones with choreography by Sheila Falcolner, designs by Timothy O'Brien, lighting by John Bradley, and music by William Mathias.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1967 West End London Revival with Ronald Pickup, Jeremy Brett, Robert Stephens, Derek Jacobi and Anthony Hopkins

Opened 3 October 1967, Closed 16 July 1969 (in repertory) at the Old Vic Theatre

The cast featured Ronald Pickup as 'Rosalind', Charles Kay as 'Celia', Jeremy Brett as 'Orlando', Neil Fitzpatrick as 'Oliver', Frank Wylie as 'Duke Frederick', Paul Curran as 'Duke Senior', Robert Stephens as 'Jacques', Derek Jacobi as 'Touchstone', Anthony Hopkins as 'Audrey', John McEnery as 'Silvius', and Richard Kay as 'Phebe', with Oliver Cotton as 'Sir Oliver Martext'.

Directed by Clifford Williams with designs by Ralph Koltai, and music by Marc Wilkinson.

Presented by the National Theatre.

This 'all-male' production was originally due to be directed by John Dexter (with design by Dacre Punt) at the Old Vic Theatre in the Spring of 1967, with Ronald Pickup as 'Rosalind', and John Stride as 'Orlando'.

In March 1967 John Dexter resigned as 'Associate Director' of the National Theatre, reportedly due to a dispute over both the casting, and the delayed scheduling of this production.


1973 London Revival with Dily Hamlett, Martin Potter and Ian Talbot

Previewed 18 July 1973, Opened 19 July 1973, Closed 25 August 1973 at the Open Air Theatre in Regent's Park

The cast featured Dily Hamlett as 'Rosalind', Perlita Neilson as 'Celia', Martin Potter as 'Orlando', Damien Thomas as 'Oliver', Colin Jeavons as 'Duke Frederick' / 'Duke Senior', Frank Barrie as 'Jacques', Ian Talbot as 'Touchstone', Vivienne Ross as 'Audrey', Stephen Jenn as 'Silvius', and Toni Kanai as 'Phebe'.

Directed by Richard Digby Day with designs by Sean Cavanagh, costumes by Hugh Durrant, lighting by Brian Benn, and music by Paul Laidlaw.


1975 London Revival with Susan Hampshire and Pip Miller

Previewed 29 May 1975, Opened 4 June 1975, Closed 5 July 1975 at the Shaw Theatre

The cast featured Susan Hampshire as 'Rosalind', Pip Miller as 'Orlando', John Shrapnel as 'Jacques', and Tony Haygarth as 'Touchstone'.

Directed by John David with designs by Karen Mills.

Presented by the Dolphin Theatre Company.


1978 West End London Revival with Charlotte Cornwell, James Laurenson, Charles Dance, Cherie Lunghi and Oliver Ford-Davies

Previewed 5 September 1978, Opened 15 September 1978, Closed 8 March 1979 (in repertory) at the Aldwych Theatre

The cast featured Charlotte Cornwell as 'Rosalind', Cherie Lunghi as 'Celia', James Laurenson as 'Orlando', Charles Dance as 'Oliver', John Burgess as 'Duke Frederick', Oliver Ford-Davies as 'Duke Senior', Emrys James as 'Jacques', Alan David as 'Touchstone', Ann Holloway as 'Audrey', Peter Clough as 'Silvius', and Jane Carr as 'Phebe'.

Directed by Trevor Nunn and John Caird, with choreography by Gillian Lynne, designs by John Napier adapted by Gemma Jackson and Quentin Thomas, lighting by Stewart Leviton, and music by Stephen Oliver.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.

This production was brought into the RSC's 1978/79 Repertory Season at the Aldwych Theatre at short notice to fill in the gap left in the Season following the early closure - due poor reviews and subsequent low audience attendance - of Ron Daniels' staging of Steve Gooch's new play The Women-Pirates Ann Bonney and Mary Read which had previewed from 26 July 1978, opened on 31 July 1978, and closed on 28 August 1978 after 14 performances and 3 previews.


1979 London Revival with Sara Kestelman, Simon Callow, Marjorie Yates, Michael Bryant and Greg Hicks

Previewed 27 July 1979, Opened 1 August 1979, Closed 7 May 1980 (in repertory) at the National Theatre's Olivier Theatre

The cast featured Sara Kestelman as 'Rosalind', Marjorie Yates as 'Celia', Simon Callow as 'Orlando', Dermot Crowley as 'Oliver', Nicholas Selby as 'Duke Frederick', Andrew Cruickshank as 'Duke Senior', Michael Bryant as 'Jacques', John Normington as 'Touchstone', Selina Cadell as 'Audrey', Greg Hicks as 'Silvius', and Anna Carteret as 'Phebe'.

Directed by John Dexter with sets by Hayden Griffin, costumes by Peter J Hall, lighting by Andy Philips, music by Harrison Birtwistle, and sound by Chris Jordan.


1981/1982 West End London Revival with Susan Fleetwood, John Bowe and Sinead Cusack

Previewed 21 July 1981, Opened 22 July 1981, Closed 29 August 1981 (in repertory) at the Aldwych Theatre
Returned 18 January 1982, Closed 2 February 1982 (in repertory) at the Aldwych Theatre

The original cast featured Susan Fleetwood as 'Rosalind', Sinead Cusack as 'Celia', John Bowe as 'Orlando', Jonathan Hyde as 'Oliver', Bruce Purchase as 'Duke Frederick', Trevor Baxter as 'Duke Senior', Derek Godfrey as 'Jacques', Joe Melia as 'Touchstone', Corinna Seddon as 'Audrey', Allan Hendrick as 'Silvius', and Julia Tobin as 'Phebe'.

Directed by Terry Hands with choreography by David Toguri, designs by Abd'Elkader Farrah, lighting by Terry Hands and Clive Morris, and music by Guy Woolfenden.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Following it's initial season in 1981, this production brought back the following year for a short run as part of the Royal Shakespeare Company's 'Final Season', after 21 years, at the Aldwych Theatre - the Season finished on 13 March 1982, and the RSC then moved to the Barbican Centre from 5 May 1982 (performances started in the Pit Studio Theatre on 5 May 1982, and at the Barbican Theatre on 7 May 1982).


1983 London Revival with Louise Jameson, John Curry and Douglas Hodge

Previewed 4 June 1983, Opened 6 June 1983, Closed 18 June 1983 at the Open Air Theatre in Regent's Park

The cast featured Louise Jameson as 'Rosalind', Abigail McKern as 'Celia', John Curry as 'Orlando', Stephen Rayne as 'Oliver', James Cairncross as 'Duke Frederick' / 'Duke Senior', David William as 'Jacques', Paul Raffield as 'Touchstone', Janet Moran as 'Audrey', Douglas Hodge as 'Silvius' / 'Dennis', and Julie Dawn Cole as 'Phebe'.

Directed by Richard Digby Day with designs by Hugh Durrant, choreography by Sheila Irwin, lighting by Ian Callander, and music by Ian Smith.


1985 London Revival with Juliet Stevenson, Hilton McRae, Fiona Shaw, Alan Rickman and Lesley Manville

Previewed 12 December 1985, Opened 17 December 1985, Closed 20 March 1986 (in repertory) at the Barbican Theatre

The cast featured Juliet Stevenson as 'Rosalind', Fiona Shaw as 'Celia', Hilton McRae as 'Orlando', Bruce Alexander as 'Oliver', Joseph O'Conor as 'Duke Frederick' / 'Duke Senior', Alan Rickman as 'Jacques', Nicky Henson as 'Touchstone', Mary Jo Randle as 'Audrey', Roger Hyams as 'Silvius', and Lesley Manville as 'Phebe'.

Directed by Adrian Noble with choreography by Stuart Hopps, designs by Bob Crowley, lighting by Robert Bryan, music by by Howard Blake, and sound by John A Leonard.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1988 West End London Revival with Tam Hoskyns, James Larkin, Sophie Thompson, Kenneth Branagh and Samantha Bond

Previewed 29 August 1988, Opened 31 August 1988, Closed 28 October 1988 (in repertory) at the Phoenix Theatre

The cast featured Tam Hoskyns as 'Rosalind', Sophie Thompson as 'Celia', James Larkin as 'Orlando', Richard Clifford as 'Oliver', David Lloyd Meredith as 'Duke Frederick' / 'Duke Senior', Richard Easton as 'Jacques', Kenneth Branagh as 'Touchstone', Dearbhla Molloy as 'Audrey', Shaun Prendergast as 'Silvius' / 'Le Beau', and Samantha Bond as 'Phoebe', with David Parfitt as 'Sir Oliver Martext'.

Directed by Geraldine McEwan with choreography by Julie Fell, designs by Jenny Tiramani, lighting by Brian Harris, and music by Pat Doyle.

Presented by Kenneth Branagh and David Parfitt's Renaissance Theatre Company in repertory with Hamlet and Much Ado About Nothing.


1989 West End London Revival with Fiona Shaw, Adam Kotz and James Fleet

Previewed 18 May 1989, Opened 23 May 1989, Closed 8 July 1989 at the Old Vic Theatre

The cast featured Fiona Shaw as 'Rosalind', Helen Cooper as 'Celia', Adam Kotz as 'Orlando', James Fleet as 'Oliver', John McEnery as 'Duke Frederick', Ronald Hines as 'Duke Senior', Karl Johnson as 'Jacques', David Cardy as 'Touchstone', Sarah Flind as 'Audrey', Simon Roberts as 'Silvius', and Polly Walker as 'Phebe'.

Directed by Tim Albery with designs by Antony McDonald, lighting by Peter Mumford, and music by Orlando Gough.


1990 London Revival with Sophie Thompson, Jerome Flynn and Alan Cumming

Previewed 5 April 1990, Opened 11 April 1990, Closed 15 September 1990 (in repertory) at the Barbican Theatre

The cast featured Sophie Thompson as 'Rosalind', Gillian Bevan as 'Celia', Jerome Flynn as 'Orlando', Howard Ward as 'Oliver', Clifford Rose as 'Duke Frederick' / 'Duke Senior', Hugh Ross as 'Jacques' / 'Monsieur Le Beau', Mark Williams as 'Touchstone', Joanna Mays as 'Audrey', Alan Cumming as 'Silvius', and Cassie Stuart as 'Phebe', with Jason Flemyng as 'Jaques de Boys'.

Directed by John Caird with designs by Ultz, lighting by Alan Burrett, music by Ilona Sekacz, and sound by Charles Horne.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1992 London Revival with Cathryn Harrison, Oliver Parker, Rhys Ifans and Bette Bourne

Previewed 15 June 1992, Opened 17 June 1992, Closed 8 September 1992 (in repertory) at the Open Air Theatre in Regent's Park

The cast featured Cathryn Harrison as 'Rosalind', Sarah-Jane Holm as 'Celia', Oliver Parker as 'Orlando', Ken Bones as 'Oliver', David Sumner as 'Duke Frederick' / 'Duke Senior', Bette Bourne as 'Jacques', John Kane as 'Touchstone', Samantha Spiro as 'Audrey', Nigel Hastings as 'Silvius', and Anna Patrick as 'Phebe', with Rhys Ifans as '1st Lord' / 'Jaques de Boys'.

Directed by Maria Aitken with choreography by Kenn Oldfield, designs by Bruno Santini, music by Mark Emney, and lighting by Jason Taylor.


1993 London Revival with Kate Buffery, Peter De Jersey and Samantha Bond

Previewed 15 April 1993, Opened 21 April 1993, Closed 2 September 1993 (in repertory) at the Barbican Theatre

The cast featured Kate Buffery as 'Rosalind', Samantha Bond as 'Celia', Peter De Jersey as 'Orlando', Adrian Lukis as 'Oliver', Andrew Jarvis as 'Duke Frederick', Jeffery Dench as 'Duke Senior', Michael Siberry as 'Jacques', Anthony O'Donnell as 'Touchstone', Susan Jane Tanner as 'Audrey', Andrew Cryer as 'Silvius', and Emma Gregory as 'Phebe', with Jonathan Cake as 'Charles' / 'William', and Jenna Russell as 'Hisperia'.

Directed by David Thacker with movement by Lesley Hutchison, designs by Johan Engels, lighting by Jimmy Simmons, music by Gary Yershon, and sound by Paul Slocombe.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1995 West End London Revival with Adrian Lester and Scott Handy

Previewed 23 January 1995, Opened 25 January 1995, Closed 11 February 1995 at the Albery Theatre (now Noel Coward Theatre)

The cast featured Adrian Lester as 'Rosalind', Simon Coates as 'Celia', Scott Handy as 'Orlando', Jonathan Chesterman as 'Oliver', David Hobbs as 'Duke Frederick' / 'Duke Senior', Michael Gardiner as 'Jacques', Peter Needham as 'Touchstone', Richard Cant as 'Audrey' / 'Adam', Gavin Abbott as 'Silvius', and Wayne Cater as 'Phebe', with Sean Francis as 'Jaques de Boys' / 'Monsieur Le Beau', Paul Kissaun as 'Charles' / 'Corin', Rahsan Stone as 'Amiens' / 'William', and Steve Watts as 'Sir Oliver Martext' / 'Dennis'.

Directed by Declan Donnellan with choreography by Sue Lefton, designs by Nick Ormerod, lighting by Judith Greenwood, and music by Paddy Cunneen.

Presented by Cheek By Jowl.


1996 London Revival with Niamh Cusack, Liam Cunningham, David Tennant, Joseph Fiennes and Victoria Hamilton

Previewed 18 October 1996, Opened 23 October 1996, Closed 29 March 1997 (in repertory) at the Barbican Theatre

The cast featured Niamh Cusack as 'Rosalind', Rachel Joyce as 'Celia', Liam Cunningham as 'Orlando', Sebastian Harcombe as 'Oliver', Colum Convey as 'Duke Frederick', Robert Demeger as 'Duke Senior', John Woodvine as 'Jacques', David Tennant as 'Touchstone', Susannah Elliott-Knight as 'Audrey', Joseph Fiennes as 'Silvius', and Victoria Hamilton as 'Phebe', with Brian Abbott as 'Dennis', Doreen Andrew as 'Hymen', Raymond Bowers as 'Monsieur Le Beau' / 'Sir Oliver Martext', Arthur Cox as 'Corin', Simeon Defoe as 'William', Mark Gillis as 'Jacques de Boys', Ross O'Hennessy as 'Charles', Emma Poole as 'Hisperia', John Quayle as 'Adam', and Blair Wilson as 'Amiens', along with Nathaniel Duncan, Colin Farrell and Simon Westwood.

Directed by Steven Pimlott with movement by Liz Ranken, designs by Ashley Martin-Davies, lighting by Mimi Jordan Sherin, and music by Jason Carr.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


1998 London Revival with Anastasia Hille and Paul Hilton

Previewed 19 May 1998, Opened 28 May 1998, Closed 20 September 1998 (in repertory) at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The cast featured Anastasia Hille as 'Rosalind', Tonia Chauvet as 'Celia', Paul Hilton as 'Orlando', Jonathan Bond as 'Oliver', David Rintoul as 'Duke Frederick' / 'Duke Senior', John McEnery as 'Jacques', David Fielder as 'Touchstone', Maggie Wells as 'Audrey', Guy Moore as 'Silvius' / 'Denis', and Belinda Davison as 'Phebe', with Jonathan Cecil as 'Monsieur Le Beau' / 'Corin' / 'Sir Oliver Martext', Michael Fenner as '1st Lord', Leader Hawkins as 'Adam' / 'Hymen', Martin Herdman as '2nd Lord' / 'Charles' / 'William', and Wil Johnson as 'Amiens' / 'Jacques de Boys'.

Directed by Lucy Bailey with designs by Bunny Christie, and music by Roderick Skeaping.


2000 London Revival with Alexandra Gilbreath and Anthony Howell

Previewed 12 December 2000, Opened 2 January 2001, Closed 7 February 2001 (in repertory) at the Barbican Pit Theatre

The cast featured Alexandra Gilbreath as 'Rosalind', Nancy Carroll as 'Celia', Anthony Howell as 'Orlando', Tom Smith as 'Oliver', Ian Hogg as 'Duke Frederick' / 'Duke Senior', Declan Conlon as 'Jacques', Adrian Schiller as 'Touchstone', Nina Conti as 'Audrey', Andrew Pointon as 'Silvius', and Danielle Tilley as 'Phebe', with Gavin Abbott as 'Denis' / 'William', David Acton as 'Sir Oliver Martext', Vincent Brimble as '1st Lord', Peter Copley as 'Adam', Paul Ewing as 'Amiens', Christian Mahrle as 'Jacques de Boys', David Mara as 'Monsieur Le Beau', Barry McCarthy as 'Corin', Emma Pallant as 'Hisperia', and Joshua Richards as 'Charles'.

Directed by Gregory Doran with movement by Sian Williams, designs by Kaffe Fassett and Niki Turner, lighting by Howard Harrison and Simon Kemp, music by Django Bates, and sound by Martin Slavin.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.


2002 London Revival with Rebecca Johnson and Benedict Cumberbatch

Previewed 30 May 2002, Opened 10 June 2002, Closed 7 September 2002 (in repertory) at the Open Air Theatre in Regent's Park

The cast featured Rebecca Johnson as 'Rosalind', Caitlin Mottram as 'Celia', Benedict Cumberbatch as 'Orlando', Adam Levy as 'Oliver', Jon Cartwright as 'Duke Frederick', John Conroy as 'Duke Senior', Christopher Godwin as 'Jacques', John Hodgkinson as 'Touchstone', Abigail Langham as 'Audrey', Alan Westaway as 'Silvius', and Laura Main as 'Phebe', with Daniel Crossley as 'Jacques de Boys', Alicia Davies as 'Hysperia', Ben Goddard as 'Amiens', Timothy Kightley as 'Corin', Dominic Marsh as '1st Lord', Michael Medwin as 'Adam', Tam Mutu as '2nd Lord', Harry Peacock as 'Dennis', Michael Sadler as 'Monsieur Le Beau', and Guy Vincent as 'Charles'.

Directed by Rachel Kavanaugh with choreography by Lisa Kent, designs by Francis O'Connor, lighting by Jason Taylor, music by Terry Davis, and sound by Simon Whitehorn and Emma Laxton.


2005 West End London Revival with Helen McCrory, Sienna Miller, Dominic West, Reece Shearsmith and Sean Hughes

Previewed 3 June 2005, Opened 21 June 2005, Closed 17 September 2005 at the Wyndham's Theatre

A major revival of William Shakespeare's As You Like It in London starring Helen McCrory and Sienna Miller and directed by David Lan.

Rosalind (disguised as a boy) goes into the forest in search of her father and finds Orlando, with whom she is infatuated, also fleeing tyranny. She offers to cure him of his obsession with her. Thus begins Shakespeare's great celebration of young love. The director David Lan has updated the play to the 1940s in France - the court of the Duke, exiled to the forest of Arden (the Ardennes), are philosophers and poets of Paris Cafe Society. Their songs are in the style of the music of Yves Montand and Edith Piaf. The violence in this dark romance is the memory of the Second World War.

The cast featured Helen McCrory as 'Rosalind', Sienna Miller as 'Celia', Dominic West as 'Orlando', Andrew Woodall as 'Oliver', Nigel Richards as 'Duke Frederick' / 'Hymen', Olive Rowe as 'Duke Senior', Reece Shearsmith as 'Jacques', Sean Hughes as 'Touchstone', Rebecca Jenkins as 'Audrey', Ben Turner as 'Silvus', and Denise Gough as 'Phoebe', with Andrew French as 'Charles' / 'Jacques de Boys', Michael Howcroft as 'Monsieur Le Beau', Sam Kenyon as 'Amiens', and David Killick as 'Adam' / 'Corin', along with the musician Lisa-Lee Leslie on accordion.

Directed by David Lan with movement by Ben Wright, designs by Richard Hudson, lighting by Tim Mitchell, music by Tim Sutton and sound by Paul Groothuis.

Reece Shearsmith is best known for being part of the League of Gentlemen (Drury Lane Theatre 2001).

"The production gains clarity from three strong central performances. Dominic West's Orlando is quite likeable, well muscled, prone to violence and a bit dim - just the kind of aristocratic beefcake who is supposed to send girls reaching for their biological imperative. Helen McCrory, meanwhile, is a fabulous Rosalind, the strength of her passion for Orlando never in any doubt. Giggling with Celia or ordering wine, she might start out as a kind of proto-Bridget Jones, but once she is disguised in male dress as Ganymede, she transcends all stereotypes in favour of emotional truth... McCrory, however, has form, and might have been expected to deliver. More surprising is Sienna Miller's fine performance as Celia... She portrays Celia as self-possessed and playful, full of down~to-earth merriment and perky cynicism. Miller can play tough enough to show that Celia is not just Rosalind's spaniel, while her comic abilities - imitating a regurgitating pigeon, stuffing her mouth with bread - are as robust and unpretty as they are unexpected... Like one of Cupid's arrows, this staging might not, in the long term, be completely satisfying, but with so many shots, it can't help but score." The Sunday Times

"Sienna Miller is very pretty in a conventional, blonde, Sloaney way, with small, perfect features and a petite figure. I dare say she shone in her school plays where a bit of semaphore and lots of shouting are easily overlooked when your smile is as sparkly as hers. Miller's misfortune here is to be sharing a stage with Helen McCrory, who is one of our finest actors. McCrory brings real intensity to her role as an exile from her uncle's court who dresses up as a man. Her performance comes from the inside, with every breath, gulp and sigh expressing her character; Miller wears hers like a scratchy cardigan. She is by no means the weakest link in David Lan's odd, erratic (specially in its casting) and patchy production. This is the play as Lan likes it. He's relocated it to France in the Forties for no good reason other than he wanted cafe society music. Fun as the music is - and even some of the speeches are sung - the meaningless setting proves merely distracting... McCrory and the excellent Dominic West as the rugged, wronged Orlando deserve better... In the scenes in which she pretends to be Rosalind in order to teach Orlando how to handle women, McCrory is wonderfully moving and funny. That her efforts sometimes look desperate is all too understandable." The Mail on Sunday

"What a lark, what a romp, what an entertainment is As You Like It directed by David Lan at Wyndham's Theatre. Bubbling with bright cameos, WWF-style wrestling, roundelays, and the lilting accordian music of Lisa-Lee Leslie, this is Shakespeare as a musical rom-com set in a postwar France full of the kind of stock French figures that people those Stella Artois advertisements... As Touchstone the Fool, the stand-up comedian Sean Hughes is an enjoyable buffoon. And Clive Rowe, as the exiled Duke, is infectiously jolly as he leads the chorus in the green dream-wood of Arden." The Sunday Telegraph

As You Like It in London at the Wyndham's Theatre previewed from 3 June 2005, opened on 21 June 2005 and closed on 17 September 2005


2006 West End London Revival with Lia Williams and Barnaby Kay

Previewed 2 March 2006, Opened 7 March 2006, Closed 25 March 2006 at the Novello Theatre in London

The Royal Shakespeare Company present William Shakespeare's comedy As You Like It in London featuring Lia Williams and directed by RSC Associate Director Dominic Cooke.

In the Forest of Arden boundaries between reality and fantasy merge in Shakespeare's vibrant comedy of life and love.

The cast featured Lia Williams as 'Rosalind', Amanda Harris as 'Celia', Barnaby Kay as 'Orlando', John Mackay as 'Oliver', Jonathan Newth as 'Duke Frederick' / 'Duke Senior', Joseph Mydell as 'Jacques', Paul Chahidi as 'Touchstone', Meg Fraser as 'Audrey', Jamie Ballard as 'Silvius', and Caitlin Mottram as 'Phoebe', with Peter Bygott as 'Corin', Edward Clayton as 'Sir Oliver Martext', Trystan Gravelle as 'William' / 'Jacques de Boys', Alan Morrissey as 'Dennis', Miles Richardson as 'Monsieur Le Beau', David Rogers as 'Charles', Gurpreet Singh as 'Amiens', Sally Tatum as 'Hisperia', and Patrick Waldron as 'Adam', along with Peter Bankole, Chris McGill and Barry Palmer.

Directed by Dominic Cooke with choreography by Liz Ranken, designs by Rae Smith, lighting by Paule Constable, music by Gary Yershon, and sound by Paul Arditti.

This production came into London's West End following a season at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon in August 2005.

"Lia Williams makes an impressive Stratford debut as an unusually regal Rosalind, well-partnered by Barnaby Kay as a charismatic Orlando. But around them the director Dominic Cooke has gathered some very strong support, not least Amanda Harris as the bespectacled, lovelorn Celia and Jonathan Newth doubling the good and evil Dukes. There are moments when the whole production looks as though it really ought to be a musical, but Cooke is good at colouring in the light and shade of the forest, so that we are aware of seasons changing, but a little realism is all we need... In the end there are some serious issues which concern various battles of the sexes as they are led by the cross-dressed cousins Rosalind and Celia in a patriarchal society which forces them to be men not just for disguise but also in order to have any real authority. Cooke's cast have learnt the most important of all its lessons, to live in the moment and for the moment." The Daily Express

"Toothless rustics, blood-smeared hunters, sheep excrement: this Forest of Arden is unpasteuried. Dominic Cooke's production of Shakespeare's melancholy comedy creates an unruly rural idyll where the seasons change from snow to sun and Meg Fraser's Audrey is more foot and mouth than peaches and cream. This rough, functional forest is a perfect match for Lia William's tough, touching Rosalind... But there are times here when the pace slows to an unfortunate crawl. Still, there are emotional highs and entertaining lows, creating an Arden of deep roots and green shoots." The Sunday Times

"Pale, tall Lia Williams's Rosalind is so full of life and love that we really didn't know how many fathom deep she has fallen for Barnaby Kay's bright-eyed and boyish Orlando. And Amanda Harris's spectacled Celia is so perfectly petulant about it. There are many things that make this production a joy to watch; the Narnia snow, the big, beautiful tree that stands centre stage, Paul Chahidi's funny, stand-up-style Touchstone and the hippy parody gatherings round the camp fire. But it's the relationship between Rosalind and Celia that gives most pleasure." The Sunday Telegraph

RSC As You Like It in London at the Novello Theatre previewed from 2 March 2006, opened on 7 March 2006 and closed on 25 March 2006.


2009 London Revival with Naomi Frederick and Jack Laskey

Previewed 30 May 2009, opened 9 June 2009, Closed 10 October 2009 (in repertory) at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The cast featuredNaomi Frederick as 'Rosalind', Laura Rogers as 'Celia', Jack Laskey as 'Orlando', Jamie Parker as 'Oliver', Brendan Hughes as 'Duke Frederick', Philip Bird as 'Duke Senior', Tim McMullan as 'Jacques', Dominic Rowan as 'Touchstone', Sophie Duval as 'Audrey', Michael Benz as 'Silvius', and Jade Williams as 'Phoebe', with Gareth Bennett Ryan as 'Lord', Peter Gale as 'Amiens' / 'Sir Oliver Martext', Gregory Gudgeon as 'Monsieur Le Beau' / 'William', Michael Jarvis as 'Lord', Sean Kearns as 'Charles' / 'Corin', Trevor Martin as 'Adam', and Ewart James Walters as 'Hymen'.

Directed by Thea Sharrock with choreography by Fin Walker, designs by Dick Bird, and music by Stephen Warbeck.

"Tim McMullan is on typically, charmingly distractingly brilliant form as the old roue Jacques. There is, however, a lot else to savour about this beautiful and spirited version of Shakespeare's jaunty romantic comedy: a predominantly youthful and sexy cast, some amazing fight sequences, sublime music and a tremendous sense of fun. As the romantic lead, Jack Laskey makes for a charismatic, pop star-like Orlando. The lad's prowess as boxer wins him the heart of Rosalind (a suitably fetching Naomi Frederick) but their love displeases Brendan Hughes's dour Duke Frederick. There are also splendid vignettes from, among others, Dominic Rowan, who turns Touchstone into a slightly sinister Frankie Howerd-like jester, and Laura Rogers, sounding very much like Queenie out of Blackadder as Celia. Thea Sharrock extracts every ounce of value from the story, seizing inparticular on the sexual ambiguities that ensue when Rosalind, disguising herself as aman as she flees the duke's court, inadvertently finds 'himself' an admirer in Jade Williams's Phebe." The Sunday Telegraph

"It takes a while for Thea Sharrock's Forest of Arden to stop feeling like well-wrought tourist Shakespeare. In truth, even when it does, there are some very peculiar ticks to this groundling-tickling production... You half expect a jig to ensue between Naomi Frederick's unusually sweet, cross dressing runaway Rosalind and her devoted, adventurous cousin Celia, the excellent Laura Rogers. In fact, one duly arrives, at the eightfold wedding scene in which every wrong is righted, but not before Sharrock has teased some sublime comic performances from her cast... Tim McMullan's oddball philosopher Jacques is uniquely haunting and, combined with a flawlessly supercilious Touchstone from Dominic Rowan, and the general, infectious bonhomie of the cast, this production's charms prove impossible to resist." The London Metro

As You Like It in London at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre previewed from 30 May 2009, opened on 9 June 2009, and closed on 10 October 2009


2010 West End London Revival with Juliet Rylance, Christian Camargo and Stephen Dillane

Previewed 12 June 2010, Opened 23 June 2010, Closed 21 August 2010 at the Old Vic Theatre

'The Bridge Project' presents Shakespeare's As You Like It in London directed by Sam Mendes and featuring a transatlantic cast.

Rosalind (disguised as a boy) goes into the forest in search of her father and finds Orlando, with whom she is infatuated, also fleeing tyranny. She offers to cure him of his obsession with her. Thus begins Shakespeare's great celebration of young love.

The cast featured Juliet Rylance as 'Rosalind', Michelle Beck as 'Celia', Christian Camargo as 'Orlando', Edward Bennett as 'Oliver', Michael Thomas as 'Duke Frederick' / Duke Senior', Stephen Dillane as 'Jacques', Thomas Sadoski as 'Touchstone', Jenni Barber as 'Audrey', Aaron Krohn as 'Silvius', and Ashlie Atkinson as 'Phoebe', with Alvin Epstein as 'Adam' / 'Sir Oliver Martext', Jonathan Lincoln Fried as 'Monsieur Le Beau', Richard Hansell as 'Amiens' / 'Jacques de Boys', Ron Cephas Jones as 'Charles' / '1st Lord', Anthony O'Donnell as 'Corin', and Ross Waiton as 'Dennis'/ 'William'.

Directed by Sam Mendes with choreography by Josh Prince, sets by Tom Piper and Tom Watson, costumes by Catherine Zuber, lighting by Paul Pyant, music by Mark Bennett, and sound by Simon Baker.

Stephen Dillane's London stage credits include the title role in Michael Blakemore's production of Hannie Rayson's Life After George at the Duchess Theatre in 2002; 'Henry' in David Leveaux's revival of Tom Stoppard Real Thing at the Albery Theatre in 2000; the title role in Katie Mitchell's revival of Anton Chekov's Uncle Vanya, for the Royal Shakespeare Company, at the Young Vic Theatre in 1998; 'Clov' in Kate Mitchell's revival of Samuel Beckett's Endgame at the Donmar Warehouse in 1996; 'Edmund Tyrone' in Howard Davies' revival of Eugene O'Neill's Long Day's Journey Into Night at the National Theatre's Lyttelton Theatre in 1991; and 'Gerry' in Patrick Mason's production of Brian Friel's Dancing at Lughnasa at the Phoenix Theatre in 1991.

Presented as part of the Bridge Project 2010, along with The Tempest, and performed in repertory by the same acting company and creative team. This production was staged at Brooklyn Academy of Music's Harvey Theater in New York where it previewed from 12 January 2010, opened on 26 January 2010 and closed on 13 March 2010.

Prior to tickets going on sale it was anounced that Anne-Marie Duff, who was originally announced to play 'Rosalind' in this production, had withdrawn due to illness in her family.

"As You Like It is a wandering minstrel of a play that meanders through a forest... and combines earthy realism with formalised ritual. Sam Mendes rejoices in this weirdness, creating a trippy world of yokels and court sophisticates. But his vision starts out so dark that until the interval you feel more like you are trapped in the grey, cold world of Ibsen or Chekhov than in one of Shakespeare's festive comedies... Juliet Rylance and Christian Camargo don't quite bubble with the chemistry of love first found, but this may have something to do with the fact that they are married in real life. That said only the most heartless would fail to rejoice in the light and joyous ending." The Sunday Telegraph

"Sam Mendes's production is serviceable rather than inspired, but Juliet Rylance (stepdaughter of the great Mark) makes it more than usually charming by the force of her personality. She looks like a cross between Kirsty Young, Jennifer Ehle and Greta Scacchi. Slender, blonde, husky and attractively boyish while clearly being extremely girlie, there's no doubt that when her Rosalind plants a kiss on Christian Camargo's astounded Orlando (her real-life husband), she's fallen madly, deeply in love, touched by the lunacy that afflicts so many of Shakespeare's lovers. Stephen Dillane plays up the theatricality of the sardonic outsider, Jacques. He haunts the fringes of the forest wearing a paper crown and a Comic Relief red nose while adopting a distinctly down-beat Beckettian air, determinedly sucking 'melancholy out of a song as a weasel sucks eggs'. In his thespy delivery of 'All the world's a stage' he sends up each character it describes, and manages to sound very young, extremely old, fat and thin, before singing a song in a hilarious impersonation of Bob Dylan, complete with harmonica." The Mail on Sunday

The Bridge Project is an unprecedented three-year, transatlantic partnership uniting The Old Vic Theatre in London with The Brooklyn Academy of Music in New York, and Neal Street Productions. Each year a single Anglo/American company will perform a double-bill of classic works in repertory at both the Brooklyn Academy of Music and at The Old Vic Theatre, and make at least one other international visit. The project is borne out of the group's shared desire to produce large-scale, classical theatre for international audiences. The Project started in 2009 when Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale and Chekhov's The Cherry Orchard where presented. The Bridge Project was originally due to start in 2008 with Shakespeare's Hamlet and The Tempest with a company lead by Stephen Dillane but was postponed when Stephen Dillane withdrew "due to personal reasons arising from family reasons."

As You Like It in London at the Old Vic Theatre as part of the Bridge Project 2010, previewed from 12 June 2010, opened on 23 June 2010 and closed on 21 August 2010 - playing in repertory with The Tempest.


2011 London Revival with Katy Stephens and Jonjo O'Neill

Previewed 13 January 2011, Opened 17 January 2011, Closed 5 February 2011 (in repertory) at the Roundhouse Theatre

The cast featured Katy Stephens as 'Rosalind', Mariah Gale as 'Celia', Jonjo O'Neill as 'Orlando', Charles Aitken as 'Oliver', Sandy Neilson as 'Duke Frederick', Clarence Smith as 'Duke Ferdinand (Senior)', Forbes Masson as 'Jacques', Richard Katz as 'Touchstone', Sophie Russell as 'Audrey', James Tucker as 'Silvius', and Christine Entwisle as 'Phoebe', with David Carr as 'Charles', Dyfan Dwyfor as 'William', Geoffrey Freshwater as 'Corin', James Howard as '1st Lord', Ansu Kabia as 'Monsieur Le Beau', Debbie Karley as 'Hisperia', Dharmesh Patel as 'Lord Amiens', Peter Peverley as 'Jacques de Boys' / 'Dennis', James Traherne as 'Sir Oliver Martext', and Roger Watkins as 'Adam'.

Directed by Michael Boyd with choreography by Straun Leslie, designs by Tom Piper, lighting by Wolfgang Goebbel, music by John Woolf, and sound by Andrew Franks.

Presented by the Royal Shakespeare Company.

"There is a lot of singing in Michael Boyd's bare bones production of Shakespeare's dark comedy of amorous manners and political chicanery. Nearly everyone who has some lyrical lines to say delivers them as a kind of folk ballad accompanied by a guitar. Most impressive of these performances is Forbes Masson's Jacques, whose high keening voice stops the show. It is a rare uplifting moment in an otherwise modest production... As Rosalind, Katy Stephens plays her male alter-ego, Ganymede, like a principal boy and has a sparking energy that compensates for a slightly gabbled delivery. Jonjo O'Neill's Orlando is suitably virile and wide-eyed, notably in the opening scene when he fights with his jealous older brother, Oliver." The Daily Express

"Michael Boyd's production of what is by no means a short play is brisk, intelligent and engaging. At first sombre in appearance, the characters experience a sort of spring awakening, perhaps best embodied by Mariah Gale's Celia, who casts off her fine black garb to become a loosehaired, free-spirited creature. Gale is at her most skilful in her interactions with Katy Stephens's resourceful Rosalind... Stephens makes Rosalind a thoroughly charming romantic schemer, and Gale's Celia, less loquacious, is her ideal foil. Also excellent are Richard Katz, whose straitjacketed Touchstone resembles Shockheaded Peter, and Forbes Masson, a Jacques whose melancholy seems a form of vanity. Jonjo O'Neill's Orlando creates a strong initial impression, which isn't quite sustained, but he has an appealing stage presence, and there is nice attention throughout the cast to comic nuance and the details of the text." The London Evening Standard

As You Like It in London at the Roundhouse Theatre previewed from 13 January 2011, opened on 17 January 2011, and closed on 5 February 2011 (in repertory)


2015 London Revival with Michelle Terry and Simon Harrison

Previewed 15 May 2015, Opened 20 May 2015, Closed 5 September 2015 (in repertory) at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The cast featured Michelle Terry as 'Rosalind', Ellie Piercy as 'Celia', Simon Harrison as 'Orlando', William Mannering as 'Oliver' / 'Amiens', David Beames as 'Duke Ferdinand' / 'Duke Senior', James Garnon as 'Jacques', Daniel Crossley as 'Touchstone', Sophia Nomvete as 'Audrey', Jack Monaghan as 'Silvius', and Gwyneth Keyworth as 'Phebe', with James Donovan as 'Lord', Patrick Driver as 'Corin', Gary Shelford as 'Charles' / 'Hymen', Perri Snowdon as 'Monsieur Le Beau' / 'Jacques de Boys', Stefan Trout as 'Lord', and Paul Whitechurch as 'Adam'.

Directed by Blanche McIntyre with choreography by Sian Williams, sets by Andrew D Edwards, costumes by Sabrina Cuniberto, and music by Johnny Flynn.

"This traditional version showcases the cross-dressing, dance, song, brilliant conversation and satire that make the 400-year-old play sparkle... When Rosalind eventually reveals herself to Orlando a sense of relief falls across the theatre. As Touchstone wisely declares: 'The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool'. He's right, surely even a fool wouldn't miss the chance to catch this." The Sunday Mirror

"[Michelle Terry is] a brilliant Shakespearean actress: the verse clear, but with a fine sense of the physical comedy too... Indeed, the double act that really drives this rom-com is Rosalind and her chum Celia. Their friendship is giddy; they scurry about the stage like wind-up toys, and with whip-crack comic timing, prompt proper guffaws. Unfortunately, they outstrip the rest of the show. The set-up of the first half is slow and plain, and McIntyre hasn't really cracked the verbiage of Jaques or the fool, Touchstone... I would have liked more such directorial interventions; this production felt a bit flat." The Independent

As You Like It in London at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre previewed from 15 May 2015, opened on 20 May 2015, and closed on 5 September 2015 (in repertory)


2015 London Revival with Rosalie Craig, Joe Bannister, Patsy Ferran and Mark Benton

Previewed 26 October 2015, Opened 3 November 2015, Closed 5 March 2016 (in repertory) at the National Theatre's Olivier Theatre

The cast featured Rosalie Craig as 'Rosalind', Patsy Ferran as 'Celia', Joe Bannister as 'Orlando', Philip Arditti as 'Oliver', Leo Wringer as 'Duke Frederick', John Ramm as 'Duke Senior', Paul Chahidi as 'Jacques', Mark Benton as 'Touchstone', Siobhan McSweeney as 'Audrey', Ken Nwosu as 'Silvius', and Gemma Lawrence as 'Phebe', with Leon Annor as 'Charles', Jonathan Coote as 'Court Lord', Jonathan Dryden Taylor as 'Dennis', Fra Fee as 'Amiens', Hazel Gardner as 'Hisperia', Patrick Godfrey as 'Adam', Nathan Ives-Moiba as 'Jacques de Boys', Ekow Quartey as 'William', Jay Saighal as 'Monsieur Le Beau', Alan Williams as 'Corin', along with Jeremy Avis, Lea Cornthwaite, Jonathan Glew, Hazel Holder, Ellie Kirk, Catherine May, Elaine Mitchener, Simon Prag, Osnat Schmool, Belinda Sykes and Rebecca Thorn.

Directed by Polly Findlay with sets by Lizzie Clachan, costumes by Christina Cunningham, lighting by Jon Clark, music by Orlando Gough, movement by Jonathan Goddard, and sound by Carolyn Downing.

"The director Polly Findlay and the designer Lizzie Clachan have opted for a grimly and joylessly 21st-century opening scene set in an office full of computer screens... The idea is obviously that this horrible, regimented, soulless place will give way to the magical, living and breathing Forest of Arden once young love begins to blossom. When it does, it's undoubtedly a jaw-dropping coup de théâtre... It's clever and original, but, unlike a real forest, it's still dismally ugly to look at, still cold and grey and metallic, for all the warm lighting effects. Aside from this, Findlay's production is a delight. Describing an actor or actress as luminous always makes them sound like a high-visibility vest, but as Rosalind, one of Shakespeare's wittiest and loveliest heroines, Rosalie Craig really is luminous. And Patsy Ferran is absolutely delightful, an impish, gauche, petulant and compulsively watchable Celia... Joe Bannister makes a handsome, boyishly amiable Orlando, and his wrestling match with the enormous Charles is a hoot... It's the first time the National has given us an As You Like It in 30 years - and it's been far too long." The Sunday Times

"Polly Findlay's revolutionary revival reimagines Duke Frederick's court as a contemporary City trading floor... Findlay has thought through this relocation carefully and cleverly, creating an admirably clear account of Shakespeare's best-loved comedy. Scheming Duke Frederick has seized control of the business from his nice brother, Duke Senior. His slick, malevolent office manager, Oliver, has broken his promise to educate his own kid brother, Orlando, and made him the evening cleaner instead... It's Rosalie Craig's spirited, glowing Rosalind, utterly infatuated by Orlando, who lights up every scene... Even Paul Chahidi's marvellous Jacques, a real depressive rather than the usual killjoy cynic, can't dampen the mood. Purists will doubtless be up in arms, but here's As You Like It as I love it: free-wheeling, fresh, funny, invigorated and invigorating, a little bit silly but brimful of heart." The Mail on Sunday

As You Like It in London at the National Theatre's Olivier Theatre previewed from 26 October 2015, opened on 3 November 2015, and closed on 5 March 2016 (in repertory)


2018 London Revival with Olivia Vinall and Edward Hogg

Previewed 6 July 2018, Opened 11 July 2018, Closed 28 July 2018 at the Regent's Park Open Air Theatre in London

In the mythical Forest of Arden, a world of transformation where anything is possible and anything permissible, two young people discover what it really means to be in love.

The cast featured Olivia Vinall as 'Rosalind', Keziah Joseph as 'Celia', Edward Hogg as 'Orlando', Beruce Khan as 'Oliver', Simon Armstrong as 'Duke Fredrick' / 'Duke Senior', Maureen Beattie as 'Jacques', Danny Kirrane as 'Touchstone', Amy Booth-Steel as 'Audrey', Jacade Simpson as 'Silvius', and Joanne McGuinness as 'Phoebe', with Jack Beale as 'Monsieur Le Beau', Me'sha Bryan as 'Amiens', Gary Lilburn as 'Adam' / 'Sir Oliver Martext', Kristian Phillips as 'Charles' / 'Jacques de Boys', John Stahl as 'Corin', and Silas Wyatt-Barke as 'William'.

Directed by Max Webster with movement by Polly Bennett, designs by Naomi Dawson, lighting by Lee Curran, music by Charlie Fink, and sound by Gareth Fry.

When this production opened at the Open Air Theatre in London's Regent's Park in July 2018, Ben Lawrence in the Daily Telegraph highlighted how "Max Webster's spirited production embraces the craziness and presents a new age eco-comedy with the inhabitants of the Forest of Arden adhering to some sort of hippy-dippy notion of permaculture.... This As You Like It fizzes with playfulness and lascivious intent - and the performers all seem as frolicsome as wood nymphs." Fiona Mountford in the London Evening Standard described it as being a "warm, charming and Park-perfect production of one of Shakespeare's loveliest plays... Olivia Vinall, mellifluous of voice, blazes increasingly brightly as Rosalind, swaggering with faux-masculine bonhomie when in disguise as Ganymede but struck with extreme lovesickness for Orlando. Keziah Joseph gives strong and playful definition to Celia, a role that can sometimes get lost, and there's richly amusing work from Danny Kirrane as Touchstone." Sam Marlowe in the Times explained that "a suggestion of environmental catastrophe hovers over the romance like distant thunder on a blue sky day. The concept isn't quite sustained, but who cares when this is such a joy - a merry muddle of the sweet, tender, bawdy and melancholy... Gorgeous." Sarah Hemming in the Financial Times said that Max Webster's "modern-dress reading brings an ecologically aware twist to the story... Peppered with bright, touching performances this is a warm, thoughtful production about transformation on many levels." Patrick Marmion in the Daily Mail thought that "the joy of his modern dress production is that it plugs into comic types from today's Britain and matches them with their elizabethan counterparts."

As You Like It in London at the Open Air Theatre in Regent's Park previewed from 6 July 2018, opened on 11 July 2018 and closed on 28 July 2018


London Revival 2018/2019 with Jack Laskey and Bettrys Jones

Previewed 2 May 2018, Opened 17 May 2018, Closed 26 August 2018 (in repertory) at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre
Returned 7 August 2019, Closed 20 September 2019 (in repertory) at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

The cast for the 2018 season featured Jack Laskey as 'Rosalind', Nadia Nadarajah as 'Celia', Bettrys Jones as 'Orlando', Shubham Saraf as 'Oliver', Helen Schlesinger as 'Duke Frederick', Pearce Quigley as 'Jacques', Colin Hurley as 'Touchstone', James Garnon as 'Audrey', Richard Katz as 'Silvius', and Catrin Aaron as 'Phoebe', with Michelle Terry as 'Adam', and Tankia Yearwood as 'Amiens'.

The cast for the 2019 season featured Jack Laskey as 'Rosalind', Nadia Nadarajah as 'Celia', Bettrys Jones as 'Orlando', Peter Bray as 'Oliver', Lily Bevan as 'Duke Frederick', Sophie Stone as 'Jacques', James Garnon as 'Touchstone', Scott Brooksbank as 'Audrey', Simon Scardifield as 'Silvius', and Stacy Abalogun as 'Phoebe', with Kudzai Sitima as 'William', and Tanika Yearwood as 'Amiens'.

Directed by Federay Holmes and Elle While, with choreography by Sian Williams, designs by Ellan Parry, and music by James Maloney.

When this production opened at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre in May 2018, Ann Treneman in The Times praised how "the casting is revolutionary: gender blind, race blind, disability blind... This works, rather brilliantly, in the gentle and hilarious As You Like It... There is a star quality to the performance of Jack Laskey, a very tall and funny Rosalind. The casting suits the plot for soon he is larking about the Forest of Arden dressed as a man. He is besotted with Orlando who is (surprise!) played by a very short woman, Bettrys Jones. They make a great odd couple." Paul Taylor in the i newspaper wrote that "this show is full of lovely things. Jack Laskey plays Rosalind with a thrilling emotional spontaneity, clearly going out of her mind with love for Bettrys Jones's cross-cast Orlando. Deaf actor Nadia Nadarajah plays Rosalind's cousin Celia with great spirit and dash. The closeness of their relationship is beautifully conveyed through special sign language." Henry Hitchings in the London Evening Standard thought that "this is an interpretation that conveys little of the play's rustic charm. Lacking magic and a sense of love's combustible and transformative power, it's also, more problematically, short on humour, with Pearce Quigley's Jaques the one drily melancholic outlier." Sarah Hemming in the Financial Times highlighted that "the revelation of the show is the inclusion of deaf actress Nadia Nadarajah as Celia. She's a vivid, expressive and engaging Celia and she and Jack Laskey [as Orlando] create a touching, tender relationship: as they interpret for one another, they bring new vitality to the play's interest in care, belonging and agency. What do we lose? Depth. Darkness. Shape... There is plenty to like in this genial and exuberant production, but a firmer directorial hand might have yielded more light, shade and intent." Dominic Cavendish in the Daily Telegraph asked: "As You Like It? It's as they damn well please. Gender-blind? Tick. But also colour-blind and disability-blind - in perhaps the most striking touch, Nadia Nadarajah - who's deaf - plays Rosalind's cousin Celia. You won't have heard famous lines like 'You have simply misused our sex in your love-prate' delivered this way, to wit un-spoken, before. She uses sign-language - inviting confusion in us, but also generosity." Michael Billington in the Guardian said that, "for all the ensemble unity, I shall remember it chiefly for Jack Laskey's overpowering Rosalind."

As You Like It in London at the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre previewed from 2 May 2018, opened on 17 May 2018, and closed 26 August 2018 (in repertory), returned 7 August 2019, and closed 20 September 2019 (in repertory)